Miscellaneous Rumbles

Cocaine left me flat..

51

I've always preferred Peter Green over Clapton when it comes to British blues players.

Well yes. That's the essence of my latest essay up-thread. Clapton kinda isn't a blues player, as his career playing other music illustrates.

BUT. While I couldn't be a bigger fan of Peter Green's early work - none of the other British blues-rockers channeled the real Delta-to-Chicago heart-n-soul like Green - I think much of what was interesting and compelling about Fleetwood Mac in those years came not from him but from the collaboration. And with the tragically under-recognized guitar of Danny Kirwan in particular.

Whether PG would have remained vibrant and creative through a long later career is unanswerable. Had he sustained his tapped-into-the-main-vein blues voice through decades, that would have been a wonderful thing. But for how long can you play the blues, the real blues, and nothing but the blues and remain either interesting and/or a viable recording artist? And had he evolved - or contributed his singular tone, note choice, and phrasing to other musical contexts - what would that have sounded like? Might he have gone in a Clapton-esque pop direction, or found something more evolutionary like Beck and Fripp?

Unanswerable questions. But in those Brit blues boys years, no one (for my money) did it better than Green. That's for sure!

52

Yes...but Oh Well, Green Manalishi, Albatross etc are hardly Delta Blues standards. Good heavy white blues songs, but I admit to not knowing much else about PGs blues output. Both he and Clapton have done a Robert Johnson tribute of course, albeit later in their careers

53

And can I mention Since I've Been Loving You? I find an aching blues melancholy in Pages playing that is phenomenal. Much rather listen to that, and I do a lot

54

Oh Well, Green Manalishi, Albatross etc are hardly Delta Blues standards.

Definitely not. And "Oh Well"'s impact on me goes on and on. Not only the well-known Part I, but the brooding, stately, atmospheric Part 2. And, man, if a latter PG career had continued to delve into instrumentals like those, we've really missed something. That material has had a huge impact on my own writing. (If not so much on the playing...because you know...who can play like that? Clapton himself - and BB King - acknowledged Green's utter mastery of blues.)

can I mention Since I've Been Loving You? I find an aching blues melancholy in Pages playing that is phenomenal.

You can. And I agree.


For some reason, I keep thinking about my attitude toward Clapton. His early material stands up today; it's music for the ages. That put him in a pantheon with Hendrix and Green, who got no second act and so can only be judged on their first. AND - a good bit of Clapton's later material, while certainly more middle-of-the-road - is very good indeed. (Though with fewer immortal tracks.)

Given those two prodigious careers (one in stature and impact, the other in longevity and consistent craftsmanship), how can I possibly denigrate Clapton? It's not his fault I miss the early fire - that I had expectations he had no obligation or inclination to meet.

I'm hoping I can sum up my Clapton attitude by saying that, in the light of all that, it's a damn shame that "Cocaine" is the best-known Clapton song, and one others might judge him on. It's terribly unfair to him as an artist. Bad song, bad time for him, apparently good commercial timing.

But if all a listener knows is "Cocaine" (as is apparently, surprisingly, the case for many), they don't know Clapton. If they like that song, there's no certainty they'll like most of the rest of his work. And if they don't like that song - and stop there - they'll miss so much.

They might even call him out for something long-term Clapton fans forgive - rather than revere - him for.


But "Cocaine" was always a reliable way any throw-together or lazy band could jam-waste their way through 5-15 minutes of a bar gig and get or keep drinkerdancers on the floor. It was easy, and because there's almost nothing going on in it, really hard to butcher.

55

Now we’re getting somewhere. Big Greenie fan. Apparently so was Lindsay Buckingham, Carlos Santana and Judas Priest. And it was cool how he stepped aside to let Kirwan shine.

Johnny Winter was a lifelong blues man that stuck to his guns. Came outa Beaumont playing the blues and went to the grave playing them. I saw Johnny many times during the different stages of his career and health. No matter what, that guy ALWAYS played scorching guitar. That’s a guy that should be on a pedestal. I really don’t see any reason or point to putting out mediocre boring records which become the fodder of discussions like this.

56

“From The Cradle ... “

Derivative? Sure. But I still enjoy it each time I listen.

– Jazzhands11

Could not agree more, Jazz. From the Cradle is one of my favorite albums, period!

57

OK, guess I'm not done Claptonizing. (From my repeated essays in this thread, you'd think he was one of my Big Three or something...which he's really not.)

This time I'm thinking of concerts. I've seen him twice, both in big venues (naturally, I suppose). One performance was majestic and powerful; the other was phoned in. The differences are illustrative.

4/23/1987 - Richfield Coliseum, Cleveland OH
(Thanks to the internet's memory, I can locate it in time.)

Opening act: Robert Cray. I was powerfully bored. The room was so empty, I abandoned my mid-venue seats to move down front and try to homestead a better location. Then the place filled (apparently with people who knew Cray was going to be a snooze-fest), and I was moved by an usher.

It was a small band (that sounded HUUUGE): Greg Phillinganes, keyboards; Nathan East, bass; and Phil Collins, drums.

Set List
- Crossroads
- White Room
- I Shot The Sheriff
- Hung Up On Your Love
- Wonderful Tonight
- Miss You
- Same Old Blues
- Tearing Us Apart
- Holy Mother
- Badge
- Let It Rain
- Cocaine
- Layla
- Behind The Mask
- Sunshine Of Your Love

The set started with the venue dark, then a stately, slowed-down, epic coliseum-sized "Crossroads" came from the darkness, nothing but Clapton's guitar with That Immortal Tone. A single spot came up, and there stood The Man Himself. The band came in, swinging and massive. You can read the setlist and imagine how it unfolded from there.

I kept thinking that the drummer looked a lot like Phil Collins - but he wasn't introduced till sometime near the end of the show, and no Phil Collins tunes were played. But his drum sound, OMG. (Not a phrase I use.) I don't know why the image came to me, but it's stuck with me these years: his snare sounded like a tympani cannon on which midgets were being dropped by a 20-foot gantry for each beat. (I HAVE NOTHING AGAINST THE VERTICALLY CHALLENGED.)

I don't remember anything about the show as subtle, decorative, showy, or flashy. It was just a long demonstration of economy, conviction, and pure rock muscle. Clapton was as good - in every way - as I could possibly have wished, and the band was right there with him. I went away more than satisfied that I had Seen Clapton.

Fast-forward a few years; it's enlightening that I can't remember which of the following gigs I saw. I know it was an Nationwide in Columbus, and the whereseric.com site shows it's one of the these choices.

6/1/2001, Nationwide Arena, Cols OH

Opening act: Doyle Bramhall II & Smokestack

The band: Andy Fairweather Low, guitar/vocals; David Sancious, keyboards/guitar/vocals; Nathan East, bass/vocals; Steve Gadd, drums.

Set List
- Key To The Highway
- Reptile
- Got You On My Mind
- Tears In Heaven
- Bell Bottom Blues
- Change The World
- My Father's Eyes
- River Of Tears
- Going Down Slow
- She's Gone
- Don’t Let Me Be Lonely Tonight
- Travelin’ Light
- Hoochie Coochie Man
- Stormy Monday
- Cocaine
- Wonderful Tonight
- Layla
- Sunshine Of Your Love
- Somewhere Over The Rainbow

I remember a large band (which the above gig doesn't have) in which none of the supporting players stood out. (I would think I would have recognized Sancious and Gadd...but if this was the one, I didn't.)

I would expect myself to remember Clapton doing "Over the Rainbow." But again, I don't. And I'd've thought the Bramhall band would have made an impression. If I saw them, it didn't.

So was it this one?

7/12/2004, Nationwide Arena, Cols OH

Openers: Robert Randolph & The Family Band, w/Special Guest Robert Randolph

The Band:
Doyle Bramhall II, guitar/backing vocals; Chris Stainton, keyboards; Billy Preston, keyboards/backing vocals; Nathan East, bass/backing vocals; Steve Gadd, drums; Michelle John and Sharon White, backing vocals

Set List
- Let It Rain
- Hoochie Coochie Man
- Walk Out In The Rain
- I Wanna Little Girl
- I Shot The Sheriff
- Me And The Devil Blues
- They’re Red Hot
- Milkcow’s Calf Blues
- If I Had Possession Over Judgment Day
- Kind Hearted Woman
- Got To Get Better In A Little While
- Have You Ever Loved A Woman
- Badge
- Wonderful Tonight
- Layla
- Cocaine
- Sunshine Of Your Love (encore)
- Got My Mojo Working (encore)

This has the larger band I thought I recalled, but I can't believe I wouldn't remember having seen the Randolph band and the impossibly good Robert Randolph. (Or did I not get to the show in time to see the opening act?)

And could I really forget seeing both Billy Preston and Steve Gadd?

And surely tew GAWD I'd remember Clapton doing a 4-song Robert Johnson mini-set.

But if I did, I don't.

And that's the point. Whichever of these gigs I saw (and elements of both seem vaguely familiar - or, rather, there's nothing to rule either out), it just didn't make an impression. Unlike the Cleveland show, which I think was powered by collaborative synergy between Clapton and Collins, the Columbus show seemed a stage full of professional musicians playing professionally, and backing up an Eric Clapton solo gig. There was noting bad about it - but Clapton seemed far less engaged than in 1987, pro forma, doing the stuff, going through the motions.

I don't know what any of this proves - other than providing an interesting insight into his repertoire choices - but I'll take it to support the notion that Clapton, even in performance, is much better when goaded on and inspired by collaboration with titans who are fully engaged into the proceedings. That's when sparks of the old fire show up.

58

What if we've all just heard it so much over the years that it has lost all newness? I remember loving "Cocaine" when I first heard it. Maybe even for a decade or two after that, but now.... I've just...heard it, man.

Also. Jesus. Do some of you get paid by the word?

59

OK, guess I'm not done Claptonizing. (From my repeated essays in this thread, you'd think he was one of my Big Three or something...which he's really not.)

This time I'm thinking of concerts. I've seen him twice, both in big venues (naturally, I suppose). One performance was majestic and powerful; the other was phoned in. The differences are illustrative.

4/23/1987 - Richfield Coliseum, Cleveland OH
(Thanks to the internet's memory, I can locate it in time.)

Opening act: Robert Cray. I was powerfully bored. The room was so empty, I abandoned my mid-venue seats to move down front and try to homestead a better location. Then the place filled (apparently with people who knew Cray was going to be a snooze-fest), and I was moved by an usher.

It was a small band (that sounded HUUUGE): Greg Phillinganes, keyboards; Nathan East, bass; and Phil Collins, drums.

Set List
- Crossroads
- White Room
- I Shot The Sheriff
- Hung Up On Your Love
- Wonderful Tonight
- Miss You
- Same Old Blues
- Tearing Us Apart
- Holy Mother
- Badge
- Let It Rain
- Cocaine
- Layla
- Behind The Mask
- Sunshine Of Your Love

The set started with the venue dark, then a stately, slowed-down, epic coliseum-sized "Crossroads" came from the darkness, nothing but Clapton's guitar with That Immortal Tone. A single spot came up, and there stood The Man Himself. The band came in, swinging and massive. You can read the setlist and imagine how it unfolded from there.

I kept thinking that the drummer looked a lot like Phil Collins - but he wasn't introduced till sometime near the end of the show, and no Phil Collins tunes were played. But his drum sound, OMG. (Not a phrase I use.) I don't know why the image came to me, but it's stuck with me these years: his snare sounded like a tympani cannon on which midgets were being dropped by a 20-foot gantry for each beat. (I HAVE NOTHING AGAINST THE VERTICALLY CHALLENGED.)

I don't remember anything about the show as subtle, decorative, showy, or flashy. It was just a long demonstration of economy, conviction, and pure rock muscle. Clapton was as good - in every way - as I could possibly have wished, and the band was right there with him. I went away more than satisfied that I had Seen Clapton.

Fast-forward a few years; it's enlightening that I can't remember which of the following gigs I saw. I know it was an Nationwide in Columbus, and the whereseric.com site shows it's one of the these choices.

6/1/2001, Nationwide Arena, Cols OH

Opening act: Doyle Bramhall II & Smokestack

The band: Andy Fairweather Low, guitar/vocals; David Sancious, keyboards/guitar/vocals; Nathan East, bass/vocals; Steve Gadd, drums.

Set List
- Key To The Highway
- Reptile
- Got You On My Mind
- Tears In Heaven
- Bell Bottom Blues
- Change The World
- My Father's Eyes
- River Of Tears
- Going Down Slow
- She's Gone
- Don’t Let Me Be Lonely Tonight
- Travelin’ Light
- Hoochie Coochie Man
- Stormy Monday
- Cocaine
- Wonderful Tonight
- Layla
- Sunshine Of Your Love
- Somewhere Over The Rainbow

I remember a large band (which the above gig doesn't have) in which none of the supporting players stood out. (I would think I would have recognized Sancious and Gadd...but if this was the one, I didn't.)

I would expect myself to remember Clapton doing "Over the Rainbow." But again, I don't. And I'd've thought the Bramhall band would have made an impression. If I saw them, it didn't.

So was it this one?

7/12/2004, Nationwide Arena, Cols OH

Openers: Robert Randolph & The Family Band, w/Special Guest Robert Randolph

The Band:
Doyle Bramhall II, guitar/backing vocals; Chris Stainton, keyboards; Billy Preston, keyboards/backing vocals; Nathan East, bass/backing vocals; Steve Gadd, drums; Michelle John and Sharon White, backing vocals

Set List
- Let It Rain
- Hoochie Coochie Man
- Walk Out In The Rain
- I Wanna Little Girl
- I Shot The Sheriff
- Me And The Devil Blues
- They’re Red Hot
- Milkcow’s Calf Blues
- If I Had Possession Over Judgment Day
- Kind Hearted Woman
- Got To Get Better In A Little While
- Have You Ever Loved A Woman
- Badge
- Wonderful Tonight
- Layla
- Cocaine
- Sunshine Of Your Love (encore)
- Got My Mojo Working (encore)

This has the larger band I thought I recalled, but I can't believe I wouldn't remember having seen the Randolph band and the impossibly good Robert Randolph. (Or did I not get to the show in time to see the opening act?)

And could I really forget seeing both Billy Preston and Steve Gadd?

And surely tew GAWD I'd remember Clapton doing a 4-song Robert Johnson mini-set.

But if I did, I don't.

And that's the point. Whichever of these gigs I saw (and elements of both seem vaguely familiar - or, rather, there's nothing to rule either out), it just didn't make an impression. Unlike the Cleveland show, which I think was powered by collaborative synergy between Clapton and Collins, the Columbus show seemed a stage full of professional musicians playing professionally, and backing up an Eric Clapton solo gig. There was noting bad about it - but Clapton seemed far less engaged than in 1987, pro forma, doing the stuff, going through the motions.

I don't know what any of this proves - other than providing an interesting insight into his repertoire choices - but I'll take it to support the notion that Clapton, even in performance, is much better when goaded on and inspired by collaboration with titans who are fully engaged into the proceedings. That's when sparks of the old fire show up.

– Proteus

Phil Collins has a way of energizing a song with his drumming that goes beyond technique and feel, which he also has plenty of. I keep thinking of the Tears For Fears track he played on "Woman In Chains" and the Howard Jones single mix for "No One Is To Blame".

Check out how Phil Collins lifts this song when he comes in at 3:30

He does the same thing with this song at 1:37 and his harmony vocals are amazing.

60

The Beano album was his peak. All downhill from there, although I liked the Carl Perkins TV special.

61

And can I mention Since I've Been Loving You? I find an aching blues melancholy in Pages playing that is phenomenal. Much rather listen to that, and I do a lot

– Vince_Ray

Have to agree 100%, that one rings my bell, just hit a slow C minor and I'm there.

62

I can dig Cocaine, and even much of the 70s stuff (I'm partial to the Delaney & Bonnie record), but "Beano" and the early Yardbirds stuff are prime Clapton for me. Even knowing I'd found it 50 years after-the-fact, it still sounds so raw and fresh to me. To my young ears, Cream had not aged so well.

The closest equivalent from my own generation must be Jack White's explosion onto the scene amidst the blandness of early aughts butt rock. Teenage me had "Beano" alongside "White Blood Cells" on heavy rotation in my '91 Mercury Sable.

I'd also like to add my voice to the chorus of "Since I've Been Loving You" praise, "How the West was Won" having had it's own prime spot in the aforementioned vehicular discography.

63

How the West was Won is an astonishing collection, a testament to the power of Zeppelin at their prime. It throws the miserable The Song Remains the Same live set into the shade of embarrassment.

Somehow I didn't catch Zeppelin live myself, and for years - till West came out - I suffered under the delusion that live Zep was really as sloppy and limp as Song suggests. (I just accepted that they couldn't live up to the studio albums on stage, and forgave them - because the studio albums are bedrock for me. Other than occasionally tiring of Percy's keening, and thinking Pagey might sometimes have played a bit more cleanly, I couldn't (and still can't) find much to criticize in the albums - and there's so much to praise.

When I got West, all my reservations about live Zep were atomized. Zeppelin really was All That.

64

I like a handful of EC's songs. Badge and White Room stick in my mind.

As far as complete albums, I enjoy Slowhand. It's the only EC album that I can completely listen to.

The long winded jams of Cream and later blues stuff, never could keep my attention for very long. Maybe 5 minutes at best.

65

And while we're on the topic of mid-60s Les Paul toters, may I submit Mike Bloomfield's name to the discussion as an across-the-pond parallel to Sir Eric? He comes with his own supergroup resume, and his work on the first few Butterfield records--to my ears--sounds eerily similar to Clapton's own early efforts, albeit with his own, slightly jazzier, flavor. After an explosively creative 60s, he faded somewhat into obscurity through the 70s, and never had a chance for a third chapter. Was it a reluctance to go along with more popular styles that kept him from becoming the household name that is Clapton? "Highway 61..." suggests he could have done, though I suppose he never showed any particular aptitude for--or maybe, interest in-- songwriting...

66

I'm not a big fan. Don't hate him, but not a fan. As the kids say, "Meh." But this performance still sounds almost as great to me as it did when I first heard it. My older brother bought the album and said, "Hey dummy, you wanna hear something cool?" We played this song over and over.

67

holy crap Proteus- can you not condense your thoughts into a dozen or so paragraphs anymore? Every time I see one of your posts I think "he's retired- because he has ALOT of time on his hands, writing all these tome's!" LOL

And just to be clear, I do mean that as a good-natured jab... but come on!

As for Clapton, never been a huge fan. I know a lot of guitar players who agree. However, I dug his 80's stuff ("Forever Man", 24 Nights, etc)... even tho most Clapton lovers do not. I saw him on some relief aid show- maybe it was for the Haiti earthquake? Or the Hurricane that destroyed much of the Virgin Islands? I forget.... but.... Clapton slayed everybody, singing and playing. And this was only a few years ago. He's the real deal, and has flashes of brilliance. But a lot of his stuff, I find pretty boring as well. When I think of players from that era, I always think of Page and Beck WAY before I think of Clapton.

68

I have every Led Zep album in vinyl and used to play them to death. But then I heard a bunch of other stuff and drifted away from the whole Led Zep/Jeff Beck/overblown British Blues thing... Now I listen to Led Zep slightly embarrassed. I like the first couple of albums ok because they sound quaintly spooky hippy 60s. But for the most part they have some good ideas and play the life out of them. Like Jeff Beck they started to take themselves far too seriously and it all got a bit boring - for me anyway.

After reading British guitar magazines I tried really hard to like early Fleetwood Mac but I think they're a classic case of "you had to be there". I can see how they would have been fun at the time but if I'm going to listen to blues I prefer to go to the source rather than hear someone else's imitation. A lot of those guys seem to have missed the point and use the blues framework for endless guitariness. The more scrunched up the face the less I seem to like it.

These days if I am in the mood for blues recorded after 1960 I'll listen to the Black Keys or Nick Curran. To me they capture more of the spirit of the blues than Clapton, Bonnamassa, Mayer and all those face-making "blues" guitarists.

Of course this is just my opinion and is just as valid as everyone else's. There is not too much logic to it and that's the thing about music - it's not about logic it's all about feeling and of Clapton's music makes you feel good that's all that matters. At least you'll find it easier to find the records!

69

wow... JimmyR and I finally find something we don't agree on! LOL I came to and learned to appreciate Zep late in life; I think they were brilliant. Ditto Fleetwood Mac, and NOT the Peter Green blues years.... I grew up listening to Fleetwood Mac, but only in recent years have I truly appreciated their music.

Hate Black Keys... they remind me of Jack White... avant garde/different (which does not automatically = "good"), and pulling the wool over everyone's eyes lol. Look at me, I don't shave often, have really old funky guitars and effects, therefore I must be "cool" and "genius". Or, Look at me, I do my hair and dress like Edward Scissorhands, and play without a bass player, on really funky guitars no one else will play, so I must know something you don't. LOL

Now, Nick Curran is a whole 'nuther thing. LOVE him. Not a lot of guys out there playing that style anymore (sad we lost him so young). LOVE me some Nick Curran!

Mayer... he's just too derivative to get serious about. And I DID give it the ol' college try, but there are just so many players I'd rather listen to than him... he's made his mark, but I don't think he'll go down as a legend or anything... not in the future anyway. I've heard that PRS strat of his is quite the guitar tho!

70

For the record, I don’t listen to ANY of these guys for “blues,” but for what they actually are - whatever that may be. (And it’s different in every case.)

The first Fleetwood Mac I heard was “Oh Well,” originally released as a non-album single, in Sept ‘69. The first album I had was Future Games, so post-Green (and post-Spencer). The run of 5 albums from that to Heroes are Fleetwood Mac to me - by FAR my favorite era for the band. (I have almost zero use for Bucknix Mac.)

Which means I picked up on the earlier PG stuff later. What I most prize about PG are his non-blues pieces - and his playing. So, the way his blues sensibility fit into other material. Or, nother words, the least slavishly derivative work he did.

To hear early Mac play straight blues (and 50s rock & roll under the influence of Jeremy Spencer) is to hear a peculiar amalgam of sincere British homage and they-really-don’t-get-it-do-they. (EXCEPT for PG’s and Kirwan’s guitars.) Fleetwood and Mac eventually made an effective - if never terribly dynamic - rhythm section, but on the early albums, they’re all but inert.

The combination makes for a curiously static and almost contemplative vibe, which is I suppose of its time and now a bit quaint. But no one else sounded like it at the time either. (And I’ve come to enjoy it for what it is.)

All the Brit blues rockers found their own unique ways to miss the point - or at least the mark - in paying homage to American blues. What they came up with is something else (and each a different something else, as they don’t sound remotely similar). I find different virtues in all of them.

But I don’t listen to them for blues, and I hope no one else does either.

(In truth I don’t listen to them much now at all. I don’t have to, because they’re so deeply entrenched from when I did.)

71

I like LZ more now than back then...I think it's because of how I perceive the recordings from album to album.

Jimmy Page had a lot of Studio background and changed producers each album so as to have his fingerprints on everything. They are not perfect recordings, but they are really well done, and match the dynamics of their sound great.

Back in the 70's I thought they were over-hyped. If Clapton was God, then what was the measure for LZ?

72

I like LZ more now than back then...I think it's because of how I perceive the recordings from album to album.

Jimmy Page had a lot of Studio background and changed producers each album so as to have his fingerprints on everything. They are not perfect recordings, but they are really well done, and match the dynamics of their sound great.

Back in the 70's I thought they were over-hyped. If Clapton was God, then what was the measure for LZ?

– Twangmeisternyc

Clapton was God... Jimmy Page was reputed to be batting for the other side. Allegedly.

73

The Music Industry has many stories of acknowledging the "dark side" for Fame and Fortune!

74

And can I mention Since I've Been Loving You? I find an aching blues melancholy in Pages playing that is phenomenal. Much rather listen to that, and I do a lot

So much yes to this. And it's not just Page - that song is a prime example of the whole band meshing really well, swelling and falling together. Then the version on How the West was Won showing that it wasn't a studio trick...

Clapton was God... Jimmy Page was reputed to be batting for the other side. Allegedly.

If you're going to sell your soul for something, well, he got his money's worth.

I do my hair and dress like Edward Scissorhands, and play without a bass player, on really funky guitars no one else will play, so I must know something you don't. LOL

The White Stripes were a breath of fresh air on the radio at the time. The White Blood Cells era (circa 2001) was dominated by Nickelback, Staind, Puddle of Mudd, and Creed. It was time for a change.

The Eric Clapton/Jack White comparison rings true for me. I don't care much for either of their solo work. But put them in a band with the right people and you've got something (and I'd throw Joe Walsh in that camp, too). The Raconteurs album Consoler's of the Lonely is just awesome... Brendon Benson writing his usual catchy tunes, Jack White giving them some much needed fuzz-filled grunt, and the rhythm section from The Greenhornes... it's definitely worth checking out.

I'm kinda surprised no one has mentioned Alvin Lee. Ten Years After's Live at the Fillmore East 1970 left some scorch marks.

As for "Cocaine", meh.

75

I cannot agree more with the original sentiment.

I cannot stomach Clapton, Cream or just about anything EC did.

Cocaine, what a drag!

...!


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