Miscellaneous Rumbles

Car related; any Porsche enthusiasts?

26

I owned an 81 928. It was super fun. I had a manual which are harder to find and command a slightly higher premium. The 928 are stepchild of Porsches and you should be able to find a decent version for not too much $$$. After market parts are readily available. Problem areas are typically are more of nuisance issues, e.g windows, lights,etc... If you find a manual that needs a clutch, not a difficult job that can be done with trany in place as there is an inspection plate underneath that all the work can be done. Clutch kit is 700-1000 bucks. Newer models have increased hp and also command more. Interiors tend to fall apart, especially the door cards. Mine had a built in alarm that would disable the ignition, would randomly activate until I disabled it. Some question the longevity of the nikosil cylinders.

I would definitely get another one.

27

This thread is a nice opportunity to post my dream car.

28

If you're thinking about a 928, buy the absolute best one you can find, even if you have to travel to get it, and even then, only after a very thorough inspection by a knowledgable Porsche specialist. It's not the purchase price that'll kill you, it's the maintenance costs. And remember, these cars are old enough to have been through several owners who couldn't keep up with the maintenance by now.

Also realize that while they were supercar fast in their day, time and performance specs march on. Even the fastest ones will struggle to keep up with a 2013 Ford Focus ST 5-Door (5.9 seconds 0-60) and most will be left in the dust of a Hyundai Sonata.

29

If you're thinking about a 928, buy the absolute best one you can find, even if you have to travel to get it, and even then, only after a very thorough inspection by a knowledgable Porsche specialist. It's not the purchase price that'll kill you, it's the maintenance costs. And remember, these cars are old enough to have been through several owners who couldn't keep up with the maintenance by now.

Also realize that while they were supercar fast in their day, time and performance specs march on. Even the fastest ones will struggle to keep up with a 2013 Ford Focus ST 5-Door (5.9 seconds 0-60) and most will be left in the dust of a Hyundai Sonata.

– Baxter

Very sound advice, for sure.

30

I sell parts for them. Have your wallet ready. They are definitely enthusiast branded cars.

31

If you're thinking about a 928, buy the absolute best one you can find, even if you have to travel to get it, and even then, only after a very thorough inspection by a knowledgable Porsche specialist. It's not the purchase price that'll kill you, it's the maintenance costs. And remember, these cars are old enough to have been through several owners who couldn't keep up with the maintenance by now.

Also realize that while they were supercar fast in their day, time and performance specs march on. Even the fastest ones will struggle to keep up with a 2013 Ford Focus ST 5-Door (5.9 seconds 0-60) and most will be left in the dust of a Hyundai Sonata.

– Baxter

I've always liked the 928 but this sure puts it in perspective. Time marches on.

32

"Also realize that while they were supercar fast in their day, time and performance specs march on. Even the fastest ones will struggle to keep up with a 2013 Ford Focus ST 5-Door (5.9 seconds 0-60) and most will be left in the dust of a Hyundai Sonata."

funny about that. I had one of the last V6 Sonatas- an 09. The only thing it was missing was paddle shifters, so you had to take one hand off the wheel to manually shift the 6 speed, but for pure acceleration, that Alabama-assembled sedan simply beat the pants off every other car I have owned, and more than a few BMW's, Audis and Lexusses.es... too.

In fact, there was an advertising campaign featuring Kelsey Grammar, a Sonata V6 and a BMW 5 series... It was a Hyundai commercial, so guess which car won?

I went back to the 'Net at one point and got the 0-60 mph specs for as many of my old rides as I could. And confirmed the Sonata beat my 79 Z28 (9.4 sec) handily at 6.9secs, and even trumped my 93 MX6 V6 (8.2 secs).

We won't even talk about my Celica GT (over 10 seconds) or my sister's 82 Supra, which I held up as crazy quick when new (9.8 seconds). Amazing how technology can make things happen.

And here's the really strange bit- My current ride is one of those "cute utes"- a Mazda CX5 AWD. Road tests in three magazines tell me that this cute little plodder does 0-60 in 9.6 seconds, nearly identical to my "performance machine" from 1979!

But it holds more gear.

33

To be honest I'm more ate up with the look of the 928. Maybe I should test drive one first.

Thanks for ALL the comments so far.

34

Here's a thought. If you're captivated by the 928 look, ie long snout with a big V8 up front, here's a forgotten car that was very powerful in it's day, and big inside too. British body and American iron: Jensen Interceptor III, coupe or ragtop. To me, it's still an impressive looking car. Came with a 383 standard or optional 440. Not sure it you could order a 426. Drove one a friend had many years back with a worked over 440 and it went like stink! Saw 160 on Hwy 401 in Ontario and it got there quick!

35

British police used Jensen Interceptors back in the day---hence the name. One gave me a ride as I was hitch hiking back to base. They have Ferguson 4WD and handle corners like they were on rails. I like the idea of a V-8 in a small car----Cobras, Panteras, Sunbeams---someone even stuffed a Pontiac V-8 into a Miata, and a Ford 260 V-8 into a MGTD. You gotta love ingenuity.

36

Not to go off topic too much. I own a 2010 bmw m3 which has a v8 stuffed in its little frame. I purchased it used of course. 6 speed manual. Anyways it sounds like a 69 chevelle ss with cowl induction. Gurgles for 10 minutes until it warms up.

Little cars like these with properly balanced big motors are so cool.

This little beemer is far too much fun for an everyday. Yet it's reliable as hell.

37

I like the 928's pop up headlights and rounded rear end. And how the tires fill out the wheel wells.

38

Gas money I have the little brother, 328 coupe. Maintenance is unkind on these, too

39

The few Interceptors that were sold around here went through our Toyota dealer (?!?). All of us of "that age" lusted after 'em badly.

It was said that the weight of the enormous glass hatch in the rear helped balance the Detroit heavy iron at the other end. I think they were kidding.

Still a nice car today when you see one on the road. I certainly would not turn down an offer to take one for a spin.

40

British police used Jensen Interceptors back in the day---hence the name. One gave me a ride as I was hitch hiking back to base. They have Ferguson 4WD and handle corners like they were on rails. I like the idea of a V-8 in a small car----Cobras, Panteras, Sunbeams---someone even stuffed a Pontiac V-8 into a Miata, and a Ford 260 V-8 into a MGTD. You gotta love ingenuity.

– wabash slim

In high school in the late '60's, a buddy of mine shoe-horned a high performance Ford 289 into an MGB GT. Had to cut and reshape the wheel well sheet metal and put in Bilstein shocks set for the stiffest setting. As much to balance the weight but more to give traction for the rear wheels, he put some heavy plate where the floor kicks up to the rear hatch area. Went like stink and won just about every spontaneous street drag race but with the British brakes designed for the 4 cylinder, couldn't stop worth a dam!

41

This little beemer is far too much fun for an everyday. Yet it's reliable as hell. - gasmoney

That's what I love so much about my 911, Fred. Daily driver and is just rock solid.

42

I might check this one out soon:

43

Looks real clean, Paul.

44

All the rage these past few years...

http://www.bloomberg.com/ne...

My M-B "anti-dealer" mechanic is the Porsche go-to guy here in town. He has been getting a lot of the investment refurb type work. Good for him, ... although I guess they are difficult clients.

I remember a sweet Silver 356 1600 Super Speedster parked out in front of my building in Manhattan a few years back...at that time about $100,000, now about $450,000.

45

I might check this one out soon:

– Setzer

That looks hellishly cool Paul! What year is that one? Is it the 'S' model?

46

1982 and not an S.

That decal on the side might would have to go.

47

1982 and not an S.

That decal on the side might would have to go.

– Setzer

The decal is a tad large. I've always regarded the larger cars [beginning in the 60's] that have the long hood, shorter rear deck to be a very sexy design. This Porsche, and the Interceptor lead the pack for me Good luck in your hunt!

48

Where I live, small fast cars are toys. They can't handle a typical Indiana road that's in good shape, much less the average ones. We don't need speed bumps---potholes and patches are just as effective. I love true sports cars---I had a Porsche 356B years ago, a '60s Mini Cooper, and a handful of Triumphs. For as much fun as sports cars are, there are far too many airheads in SUVs on cellphones out there that will spoil your day. Add in cops that are happy to ticket people, just having a car that'll break most speed limits in first gear seems kind of pointless. By the way, I haven't had a point on my license in 45 years.

50

Drove it 4 hours home in the sun and rain


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