Miscellaneous Rumbles

Benifit of lonelyness. OR I love youtube……not guitar related.

1

My guitar addiction means i cant pass a guitar store. Ive always thought trombones are cool, but expensive and loud. I never got one because i thought i would never learn any music. Having tryed as a kid and failed. I still dont think im very good but im having fun.

I was thinking about a plastic trombone. 175 bucks. Nah. I thought i would wait. Then after a visit to grumpville, mary wanted to stop at a quilt store to get some stuff. Oh uh....a mom and pop music shop! Tiny store with junk guitars, but i spotted a trombone case with dust in the corner... Guy took it out and showed it to me.. A king brass and somewhat coroded. Price? 150. I kiddingly said 50 bucks. He called someone and be said yup.

Tryed at home. Noise..oh crap! Turned on youtube. That guy had me playing (loosely musical) in a few minutes. My lips are numb and i got a Ton of practicing to do,but i think i can hack out a tune soon.

Moral of my story? Dont wait forever to try something. Shop smart, it pays off..

Ps. I have a seperate from my house music room so no torturing any humans with sour notes.

2

Remember to blow in the small end.

How do you make a trombone sound like a French horn? Stick your hand in the bell and play off key.

Seriously, enjoy yourself. That's $50 of good clean fun.

3

1) I've always wanted to learn to play clarinet, I have a love for 40's big band, and would love to be able to play like that.

2) I can't even begin to tell you how much I've learned to do from youtube, most of it NOT music related! The internet certainly has it's faults, but the amount of education you can now access, instantly, is not to be believed.

4

I spent several months watching quantum mechanics and astronomy videos. The internet has been unable to overcome my higher math disability.

5

I spent several months watching quantum mechanics and astronomy videos. The internet has been unable to overcome my higher math disability.

– Proteus

I'm trying to watch all I can on Richard Feynman and quantum physics and youtube makes it happen as many of his classes were taped.

Munman, If I knew then I would've given you my trombone. I played for 4 years and was good but I lusted after the saxophone. Somehow my mother missed interpreted this and a trombone was shoved in face.

Ruger - I loved the clarinet also and my brother, who is 10 years older than me played in high school. I loved it but was intimidated by it and he did not give me his which was a deal killer. But I also loved Big Band (my dad listened to it) and I think I was the only 7th grader who knew who knew who Woody Herman, Artie Shaw, and Benny Goodman were.

6

I spent several months watching quantum mechanics and astronomy videos. The internet has been unable to overcome my higher math disability.

– Proteus

I'm sure I've seen many of the same videos m'self! Jolly fun!

But yup; what qualifies a person to be a good Engineer, is horribly shy of what ya need to fully understand this stuff.

PBS Digital Studios has some fun stuff too, as does NSF, so much info, so little time! I can understand why someone would wanna be a Professional Student!

So, what have I taken away from it all?

"He who dies with the most knowledge, wins!"

7

It took me five years to find the 50 buck trombone..wonder how long till i find a 50 dollar tuba? I wanne learn the song, lumpy beanpoles and dirt... Hilarious song. After a trip to nashville, i understand the song.

8

It took me five years to find the 50 buck trombone..wonder how long till i find a 50 dollar tuba? I wanne learn the song, lumpy beanpoles and dirt... Hilarious song. After a trip to nashville, i understand the song.

– munman

You know Dave, you youtube probably would've helped me learn the trombone 3x faster than learning it via our band teacher. It's like, just get me to confidently play the standard slide positions and then I'll be on my way!

9

Yup; youtube/internet sure beats the heck outta the ol' Britannica!

Remember the good ol' days of looking up the basic subject in the maroon book to find the lead to the grey book to find another lead to another grey book and another grey book and yet another grey book till they were spread out all over the living room and right on down the hall!

....yeah, if the Wife needed anything from the Kitchen, I'd go get it for her.

You could pretty well trust Britannica, but the internet requires a bit more caution locating a trustworthy site. Not so much in Science and music, but in the Humanities and current events.

There IS a downside though. Handling all those heavy Books gave ya good workout(!), the Internet and keyboards can maybe give ya carpel tunnel.

10

The internet takes up less shelf space.

11

PBS Digital Studios has some fun stuff too.

Yup. I'm a fan of Space Time, especially with the bearded presenter. Also of BBC docs with Jim Al-Khalili. Both those presenters have something of the Bob Ross calming effect in their cadence. If I'm lulled to sleep while mulling over expansive concepts, I have dreamier dreams.

Actually, as for practical education via ütube, I'm often annoyed when I'm looking for specific how-to information and the only way to get it is to watch a several-minute video (with the nugget I'm looking for buried in a wandering presentation). I'd much rather scan text and static images. But I'm sure glad for YT when nothing else avails.

And for guitar licks, it's unbeatable.

They just can't teach me timing...so my versions never sound like the originals anyway.

12

Had a spare tire that wouldnt lower. Youtube to the rescue. Learned guitar (alot at least). Just watched one called chicago's magic piano. Old man made me weep.

13

$50 tuba? Went to a yard sale for pyrex ware on the cheap. Somehow the conversation turned to having just within the prior 10 minutes having sold for $75 bucks a wooden and tartan wool set of full sized bagpipes.

Notwithstanding the ridicule then endure around here sometimes, I've always wanted to see if I were able to play them well. I love their sound. My Band instruments were flute and piccolo. So, it didn't seem like too far a stretch.

If you happen upon such a sale, let me know. If I see your $50 tuba, I'll grab it, and then run when you practice, Dave.

14

Thanks olivia. Play a recorder. Its kinda like bagpipes with out the droning. If you can play that, your set. I think they sell an electronic version for your computer so you can practice without your family going mad

15

Olivia, you can pick up a practice chanter (sp?) fairly cheaply. If I remember correctly, a penny whistle's fingering isn't to far off, either.

16

Like Tim, I am a great fan of the PBS series "Space Time".

PBS this morning has a great news video on opioids and how folks get hooked and the ramifications. Something every person and all their kids should watch.

PBS news is cool, they understand their viewers will check up on 'em. Keeps them honest in a slightly left leaning way. Hey, they are PUBLIC broadcasting after all, they think of the care and feeding of the PEOPLE First!

PBS Digital Studios also has the Viet Namm war documentary running. Pretty interesting and brings back memories I didn't even have. It started after I was already in the Navy. I could see the mountain tops from my back porch if we sailed in close enough.

Getting back to Science, I was getting all tangled up in my shorts on string theory with all the different theories going back decades, and since the entire industry is math based with no way to check anything out other than satisfying various calculations, its mental gymnastics with no actual benefit other than the thrill of the chase! The beauty of it is it dives into Quantum Mechanics and helps clear up that arena where previous chases were less than satisfying. But then....

...but then, the new batch of current events hit last fall with actions and distractions happening so rapidly that it takes yer mind off the fun stuff and back to Politics. Bummer. Less Princeton and Stanford, and more Washington and Moscow. Double Bummer.

17

I spent several months watching quantum mechanics and astronomy videos. The internet has been unable to overcome my higher math disability.

– Proteus

You aren't alone. My math teachers lost me with this one:

If A = B, and

B = C, then

A = C.

This simple equation always looked like the classic logical fallacy of circular reasoning.

18

You aren't alone. My math teachers lost me with this one:

If A = B, and

B = C, then

A = C.

This simple equation always looked like the classic logical fallacy of circular reasoning.

– Jim Krause

Funny you should say that!

When I went to high school we wanted to make our B-ball team better, so we hired a new accomplished coach. He really knew his Basketball! To fill in the rest of the year, he was also an Algebra teacher. ....uh oh.

....his first class was disbanded at the end of the first semester and a new "Economic Geography" class was instituted to salvage the rest of the year. Now THAT was a fun class!

Hadda take Algebra over again the next year and lost a full year of math in High School. It worked out Ok since after I joined the Navy and was going to school in Electronics, I was able to take USAFI College Level courses in math to get back what I lost and add more new stuff. Am I a math whizz? No. Do I even LIKE math? Nope. But I've always liked Science and knew that I needed the math.

I like E=MC2 ok, but I REALLY like M=E/C2! Wahoo! Thank you Peter Higgs, thank you very much!

My Wife has the same problem with throwing letters into math problems, but it's even MORE fun when ya ya throw in GREEK Letters! ....she really hates that!

19

Logic was the hardest math class I ever had.

The devil is the one who put the alphabet into math. When was the last time you used algebra? I use geometry often, but I haven't used algebra since college.

20

Logic was the hardest math class I ever had.

The devil is the one who put the alphabet into math. When was the last time you used algebra? I use geometry often, but I haven't used algebra since college.

– wabash slim

Used it a lot at work back in the days before computers got popular and programs got more sophisticated. Actually took my slide rule to work before calculators came into being! (then wore the printing off the "On" button of my calculator! So much better than pencil and paper!) but other than recreational use in the fun study of Science on line, uh, Algebra? maybe Never!

......yeah, my Wife once said I put my slide rule right next to my buggy whip when I got home from work so I could find them in the morning.

21

I didn't use Algebra IN college, having attended during a short bubble where you could get a degree without any math. Required 3 science courses: I took intro botany, intro geology, intro astronomy (2 terms, because I liked it).

Actually I liked all of them. I think I've made it clear on multiple occasions that I believe in science in more ways than I believe in...er...the "humanities" (though they were my majors). Always have. Science is at least as close to and expressive of the human spirit as all that damn irrational feely fuzzy stuff. It just takes some education to train the instincts.

All well and good. But all science - in its practical application - requires more math than I have the aptitude for. Teachers in my tiny high school dealt with this in a particularly adaptive way I'm not sure would be permitted under today's straitjacketed and regimented educational establishment. It was clear from verbal skills and my interests that I was "college-bound," and since colleges required a particular list of math courses, I took the prescribed sequence. This included Algebra I as a freshman, Geometry as a soph, Algebra II as a junior, the "Advanced Senior Math" (where trig and calc were introduced).

I actually did OK with Alg I (Cs and occasional Bs; I did get the concepts but could be weak on computation), and I did well in Geometry. The concepts all made sense. In Algebra II, I was essentially tutored along way behind most of the rest of the class, and maybe made half as much progress as was prescribed. In Senior Math, that tutoring continued while the rest of the kids followed through the sequence. Note that while the material I was taught was tailored to my progress, I wasn't given any grades: these were struggle-for-C classes for me.

I suppose this "personal attention" was only possible because class sizes were small: maybe 15 in Algy II and 6 or 7 in Advanced Senior Math. Such flexibility may seem to standards-based educational theorists a travesty of their intentions, as I never attained the prescribed proficiency - but on the other hand, I did learn something rather than simply failing.

I don't hate math by any means. I've read the history of its development, know some of the names, get that it's a beautiful intellectual structure and one of humanity's key and core conceptual inventions. It's the framework on which almost everything else is built. I envy people who have the same command of math as of language. (Which is a false comparison: mathematical principles would remain true even without language - and in fact math is its own language - but it did and does require the mediation of words to develop and communicate. It's just that when explanations and discussions of science venture completely into the domain of equations, I'm locked out.)

Sure do like watching visualizations of Mandelbrot series, though!

I glanced off Logic during Philosophy classes, and it made more sense to me than Algebra, Trig, Calculus. Probably because it's word-based. But, frankly, Philosophy eventually lost my interest and much of my respect. It's fun as a series of what-if word games, but as any "philosophical system" proceeds from arbitrary principles, I think as it's practiced - as an "industry" (good word for string theory!) - it's often less about a shared search for or attempted description of "truth" and more about flogging competing and mutually incompatible but internally consistent logic games.

22

A couple years ago when CERN was actively looking to nail down the Higgs Boson, I was amazed at how well Jews were working with Arabs, Blacks with Whites, Indians with Indians, and Orientals with who ever was left. (in no particular order.) In Scientific endeavors, color and race and religious cultural backgrounds seems to lose all meaning. (Ok, "Seems to", may enter the equation more than I expect.) But yeah, the languages of Science and Math appears to be stronger and more binding than what the team members left back home.

Left at home. Remember when V'ger went off to visit the Galaxy? Yeah, they put on a RECORD! A record! "Here is Earth! On a Record!" Why not a Tape? Or a CD? or a DVD?

Good choice, Carl. (and friends) It's kinda like Photos. Nobody takes photos and puts them in albums where they last centuries anymore. They download them to computers that get replaced every few years and the photos are lost, or they print them out, and the ink fades. Dots and spaces merge under the plastic and all is lost, way too soon.

The Humanities was a bummer for me. I'd use the best logic I could muster and someone always had a better answer. Peoples attitudes and actions aren't always repeatable and quantifiable. I like Math and Science! (ok, I like the concept of math mor'n the math itself) You can hang yer hat on it! ...the latest version of Science too, but not necessarily CDs or DVDs for interstellar travel.

"If everyone were a Scientist or a Mathematician, there would be no more wars". ....ok, maybe not, but Greenland may not be turning green quite so fast!


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