Miscellaneous Rumbles

Available To Order” Buyer Beware !

1

I put a deposit on a guitar at an online shop. It shows pictures of actual instrument. However I am told 4 month wait as it doesnt exist except in a tree.... How much of this is going on ?

TRADING STANDARDS.

2

Caveat Emptor.

This is one of the main reasons I don't like to shop online. I want to see and touch what I'm spending my money on before I hand it over. Hopefully you can get your deposit back.

3

I put a deposit on a guitar at an online shop. It shows pictures of actual instrument. However I am told 4 month wait as it doesnt exist except in a tree.... How much of this is going on ?

TRADING STANDARDS.

– kidgretsch

Is it Eastwood?

They frequently run small batch pre-orders that you can put a sizeable down payment on, and then there's a 3 to 4 month waiting period but they do produce them, and they are pretty good quality.

My son did this with his Eastman Flying Banana.

Knowing they weren't going to sell 50,000 units, they made them to order with only a few left in overages.

I think it's working out for them.

4

Is it Eastwood?

They frequently run small batch pre-orders that you can put a sizeable down payment on, and then there's a 3 to 4 month waiting period but they do produce them, and they are pretty good quality.

My son did this with his Eastman Flying Banana.

Knowing they weren't going to sell 50,000 units, they made them to order with only a few left in overages.

I think it's working out for them.

– crowbone

No a Les Paul lefty R6. Cites, Mop,import duty and being a Lefty is difficult without listing non existant instruments.

5

i have not seen this in standard retail other than the typical back-ordering all shops occasionally have to do. (of course) ordering straight from the builder is a different tin full of arthropods...there's a subset of people making aluminum-necked guitars, which have a bit of a following in the noise-inflected end of punk-metal, and at the worst the original modern builder, Electrical, was quoting 12-18 months turnaround. and these were $2500-$4000 instruments, so you're tying up a lot of capital.

6

Gretsch takes orders for guitars, so I’m a bit confused here.

7

2 year wait for a Ric!

8

Yep. I've done it once... with my Ric. But I had touched, messed around with and borrowed at least a half dozen of them before placing my order (and 1/3 deposit) and settling in for a 21 month wait. I had decided on a model that isn't made all that often (370/12), so I just had to wait.

But that was only once. Would I do it again? Maybe if I was truly serious and knew the maker would go the extra mile to deal with any issues that cropped up. But I am generally not a fan of on-line shopping, preferring like so many over a certain age to be able to touch, taste, try on, or in some cases simply look at from a different angle.

So much of my own acceptance of anything new comes down to a long-held confidence based on tactile sensation and comfort, and I really don't know how someone can buy something like a pair of shoes online, when it often takes a half dozen pair before my feet say "yes", but it seems to be the way of things.

At one time, I called HSC an anachronism, now it seems I am one, instead.

9

there's a subset of people making aluminum-necked guitars, which have a bit of a following in the noise-inflected end of punk-metal

That seems weird to me. It must just be the association of the material with the music: ie, metal guitar = metal music.

There's nothing about the inherent tone and response of an aluminum guitar that suggests it ought to play metal. Or even distorted. It's a gorgeous, open, resonant, even sweet sound.


No a Les Paul lefty R6. Cites, Mop,import duty and being a Lefty is difficult without listing non existant instruments.

You haven't really given enough info for anyone to evaluate whether you're dealing with a reputable outlet. Who's the dealer?

Being a lefty, you're surely aware how difficult it is for you to find the guitar you're looking for - and the more exacting your requirements in features, the harder it is. In that context, it's not surprising that a manufacturer might have to build your guitar to order, nor that a dealer would advertise such a custom as "available to order."

It's a way of letting you know that Gibson will build that guitar for someone who orders one. (I don't believe that's the case with Gretsch. Terada is working at maximum capacity on catalog items, and unless a lefty is listed as a stock item, you'd have to go Gretsch Custom Shop and wait at least 18 months.)

I guess the term "available to order" might be taken as vague and/or intentionally deceptive, but once you understand that it's offering you the chance to order a guitar made to your dream specs, it's perfectly clear. It may be a bit of music-biz jargon that isn't immediately transparent, but once you know what it means in context, it's descriptive. I can't think of a more compact term that captures its meaning more clearly.

You could choose to be grateful that you can even order exactly what you want and get it in just four months, rather than annoyed.

Or it could be a scam. It's just not evident from the information provided which attitude we all ought to take on your behalf. I can understand a touch of disappointment that, as you read the advert, you thought the guitar was immediately available - then find out it has to be built for you. (But...then why did you think you were making a deposit, rather than just paying for something to be shipped to you?) But if I was ready to spend pro-line or CS money on a guitar which is vanishingly hard to get - and it was going to come in four months - I'd be gloating up my good fortune. It's just not clear to me there's been any intentional deception.


My own product line (Tru-Arc bridges) consists of around 100 different models, taking into account five metals (and glass), two radii, three bottom profiles, at least five compensation profiles, three common post spacings/diameters, and various string counts and spacings. All of these have model numbers which describe their combination of parameters, and they're all "available to order." But I don't have every one of those permutations in stock at all times. Some are only bought once or twice a year, and it's been impossible to predict future demand for particular models well enough that I even have all of the most "popular" models in stock.

We also do completely custom orders. But if I'm out of a particular bridge, it doesn't take any longer to get a full custom than to restock a more common choice. And I don't take an order - even for a common bridge - as a real order till I receive payment. That is, I try to order enough inventory to cover projected needs (with less than perfect success), but I don't increase my stock order to the shop for a bridge I haven't been paid for.

And I never, never, never, never take an order for a full custom bridge without being paid up-front - if not in full (which is usual), then with a big enough deposit that a guy would be pained to lose it. Because, literally (and when I use the term "literally" I mean literally literally, not literally figuratively as in too much contemporary usage) every time - every single time I've had the shop make up a full custom without pre-payment, I've been stiffed. Every. Time. I still have those bridges. I'll have them till death do us part.

So I guess I'm guilty of advertising product that's "available to order."


And that's just one PART of a guitar that has so many variations. Imagine the geometrically greater combination of features and specs you get into when describing a whole guitar. I don't wonder that no one can stock - that no builder can even build - everything they're capable of making in order to keep it on hand for immediate shipment.

And what if you ordered a lefty R6 Les Paul someone happened to have in stock, advertised as new - and when you got it you found it obviously shopworn, because they'd ordered it years ago (in some particular color, etc) and not been able to sell it?

Damned if they do, and damned if they don't.

10

The Guitar is pictured on the site in 6 different views,you can buy "it". But thats another instrument - . I thought it physically existed "available to order" is what it says. Maybe the shop thought Gibson Europe had it in stock . In future I don,t trust photos or online dealers.


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