Miscellaneous Rumbles

Anyone have a right-side front ABS sensor for a ‘95 Lincoln Mk VIII?

1

No?

I didn't think so. I sure need one, though. None available through any parts channel. I'm looking for a parts car solution, I guess.

So you know. If you have a '93-'98 Mk VIII up on jacks in your yard (or your neighbor does), let me know.

Just thought I'd ask.

Sorry for the interruption.

2

I see them on ebay, used. Does Ford not offer one anymore? I can check with my Ford guys, if I have vin #

4

Ford pretends they never made them. If you have an inside guy who can find one, happy day! I'll find the VIN.

If you have a current Ebay link for the exact thing, please send. I've been striking out.


Your "aftermarket" link leads to a site that takes the general category of what you're looking for so it can return a result - any result. When I put in my actual year, make, and model, the site assures me that part won't work.

Bunch of sites like that.

5

Well, that’s about the miscellaneousest rumble I done seen

Good luck in your search, I hate it when one’s possessions are suddenly rendered obsolete for no good reason.

6

EBAY

Oh, Ok. Yeah some of those aftermarket sites are awful. Hope this helps.

7

I hate it when one’s possessions are suddenly rendered obsolete for no good reason.

Especially after I finally had the front air suspension replaced following a 5-10 year period of waffling about what to do with the car, during which it rested. It's a gorgeous car, low mileage.

Little tiny plastic housing containing what amounts to an electromagnetic pickup to sense wheel speed by counting revolutions, on a cable, with a connector.

If it's not there, no anti-lock brakes (which are almost essential on this particular car if one thinks nature might think about raining, misting, snowing, or condensing in its vicinity, and one wants to stop - or start - in a straight line). The Mark VIII was Lincoln's factory hot-rod Lincoln, but that doesn't mean one wants to slew about all the time.

For the lack of this leetle tahny thang, I have a sunny-day-only car.

So did they make the car too well - or not well enough - that it's lasted lo these 23 years, but is now effectively sidelined by Ford's no longer manufacturing the part?

I mean, that is a long time. And while Ford has always sold Lincoln on quality, maybe I wasn't supposed to take it that seriously. I shoulda wore it plumb out long ago and moved on to whatever came next.

But I like the Mk VIII.

8

Dave, I found that one too. That's right rear. I emailed the guy; he doesn't have the fronts. Called a Lincoln specialist in MA, who referred me to another one in Cincinnati, who searched two national parts databases and informed me no one has it.

Even a parts car in a junkyard will be problematic, because the sensors freeze up in the hubs, brittle over the years, and are prone to breakage during removal. (Which is how I got in this position to begin with - or my mechanic put me here in the process of replacing the airbags.)

9

Sorry. My inside guy, as you put it, is my parts dept at Ford. If you've already exhausted that, then I probably can't do you any good. It really sucks that the manufacturers only have to keep spare parts available for cars ten years or less in age.

I hate telling people they have a really heavy paperweight after something like an instrument cluster is NLA.

10

Yup to all. I'm told Ford has already discontinued parts for some 2010 vehicles. There oughta be a law, as they say.

11

I used to be reasonably plugged into the Lincoln bunch in Western Canada. It was a few years back and I had a 67, but if you like, I can ask around a few private emails I still have.... Is it an LSC or "regular" Mk viii?

12

Is "regular." It's possible sensors from other years would work, but I haven't been able to get clarity about that.

I'd appreciate if you can come up with anything.


Your '67 was a Continental? I had a '61 for a few years. Great cars.

13

Try finding parts for a Nash or a Studebaker or an import. 10 years is all of the backup that the law requires. The original manufacturers don't want to be forced to store parts for a decade that will likely never sell. Watching "American Pickers" I learned that one guy bought up all of the Stude spares and moved them to Wisconsin (I think). When someone does make aftermarket parts, they don't always fit right either. This problem will only get worse. Metal parts can be restored or remanufactured. Plastic bits won't be anywhere near as easy. I wish you good luck with your search.

14

I'm so surprised there's not an equivalent part fitted to crown vics, mustangs, or one of the other gazillion cars that used the Fox chassis.

Try asking over on the Grassroots Motorsports forums. If nothing else, those guys are geniuses at figuring out what should work.

15

I had a white Connie coupe "project" car, but sold it after nearly a decade. It was the closest I could afford to my dream Linc- a MkIII.

Oddly, I still have the hood, and recently had an online adventure (detailed elsewhere hereabouts) whilst trying to sell it.

This is actually not mine, but it's the same year model and color, so it's become my Linc's "stand in".

Meantime- will fire off a couple of emails tonight.

16

I've been told by a mechanic friend of mine, that Thunderbirds and Cougars of the era may use the same sensors. Other than airbags, they use the same chassis underpinnings. Being the more common cars, there may be more parts listings for those 2 cars than the Lincoln for the same ABS part number listings. Worth a try.

17

My '61 was also white, and a convertible. It had a broken top bow I didn't fix in several years of ownership, and was a 20-yard car. It would run further than that, but that's how far away it would look good. I sold it on Ebay years ago to a guy named "nacilbuper" in California. (Which decodes to "Republican.") He was still looking for parts years later, so as a "tarcomed" I felt vindicated.

Well, the MkIII was not My Thing. The pinnacle of Markness or Continentalism, to me, is the MkII. On my work trip to the panhandle of Texas last week, on a long lonely straight state road, we passed a deteriorated tiny showroom in a now-non-existent town that had TWO MkIIs parked in it, as well as a third car we drove by too fast to identify. Guy driving wouldn't stop EITHER time so I could look at them. I should have been driving.

But my ABS isn't working, so that wouldn't have been safe.


MadScience, thanks for that suggestion. I'll see if I can find some listings. The mechanic should be able to tell by looking whether they would work.

But you'd THINK a Ford dealer would be able to tell you if the parts crossed. If he cared to go that much trouble...

18

Herr Proteus, for a gazillion years we drove 16 tons of steel without anti-locking brakes. A scenario exists where you can simply disconnect the ABS system and be able to still brake safely (like the olde days). Of course, you will come skidding to a stop if you slam on yer brakes. Disassembling the ABS is an option that should work unless vehicle inspection is an issue and it may be hard to sell down the road. If you can't find parts you can't find parts. Good luck with the Linc, sir!

19

Herr Proteus, for a gazillion years we drove 16 tons of steel without anti-locking brakes. A scenario exists where you can simply disconnect the ABS system and be able to still brake safely (like the olde days). Of course, you will come skidding to a stop if you slam on yer brakes. Disassembling the ABS is an option that should work unless vehicle inspection is an issue and it may be hard to sell down the road. If you can't find parts you can't find parts. Good luck with the Linc, sir!

– BigJImSlade

No auto inspections in Indiana anymore. Lots of clunkers on the road, tho. No anti lock brakes? I grew up with basic hydraulic drum brakes (in the town where they made many of the first disc brakes---go figure). ABS just automatically pumps the brakes for you, like we learned to do in Driver's Ed 50 years ago.

I'd think that Ford would use many of the same parts on a multitude of platforms. There has to be crossover parts, tho they'd rather sell Lincoln parts for twice as much as identical Ford parts.

20

A scenario exists where you can simply disconnect the ABS system and be able to still brake safely (like the olde days).

Jim, I'd be with you - if this car were powered and balanced and built for "ordinary" driving dynamics.

But it's a little like aircraft that simply can't be flown safely without the computer control. The designers of this rocket apparently assumed anti-lock brakes as part of the package, and the rest of the vehicle dynamics depend on them. A bit light in the back end (like oh so many muscle cars), this car is bad enough on ice/snow WITH ABS. I hate to imagine winter driving without it. And on a wet road, unless you feather the accelerator delicately from a start, it's hard to even get going in a straight line without the ABS.

In the olden dayes when we feathered and finessed our behemoths, we were using drum brakes that were slower to react, slower to grab, and in general less effective. Also, everyone else on the road was driving similarly equipped cars, and it was an even playing field. I think the American road (and the blithe oblivious drivers who use it) now assume computer-controlled disc ABS systems - and all the other traction control, dynamic assists, and safety features most cars have increasingly had for the last 20 years. Without ABS on this car, I'm at a decided disadvantage in that environment.

Today's cars are incalculably safer than what we used to drive - while, paradoxically, drivers have arguably gotten less engaged, less attentive, less skillful. Still, the net result has been plunging accident injury and highway death rates, so there's clearly something to modern technology.

You're asking me to be a better driver, using skills from decades ago, and that may or may not happen. I still regularly drive the '55 Cadillac and the '66 Toronado, both with very different driving dynamics than new cars (and each other), and while I manage OK with them, I don't feel as safe in their cages of steel as I do in modern cars. No matter how quickly I react in one of those cars, and how good I am at massaging the brakes, in an emergency stop that a modern car driven by a texting teenage girl would handle with grace and composure, I'm wiggling all over the road, pitching from side to side, and taking MUCH longer to stop in the old boats - squealing and terrifying both other drivers and myself.

The MkVIII without its ABS is the worst of both worlds - REALLY grabby fade-resistant brakes that engage instantly, with dynamics built for some computer assist.

On dry pavement, it's fine (though definitely safer with the ABS). On wet, it just feels skittish. I readily admit I'm not a good or attentive enough driver to finesse it safely.

At this point, I don't have to unhook the ABS - the broken sensor disables it automatically. As Wabash points out, the state doesn't care. I once had an RX7, though, and on one occasion its 1987 antilock brakes undoubtedly saved my life (and that of an Amish family in a buggy). So I do care.

21

Tim- maybe you know about this place already?

http://www.markviii.org/LOD2/

An absolute trove of Mk viii info, but it seems that your sensor problem is far from unique. Several people on there have fallen down the same rabbit hole, even with later units (98).

(I have sent notes to a couple of Lincoln shade-tree types from my old days. Will PM you when/if I get some info)

22

Kevin, I’ve trawled LOD as well as Lincoln vs Cadillac and another MkVIII forum. Prospects look dim everywhere.

I’m grateful for your efforts, and if you magically happen on something, it’ll be Celebration Day (or Lincoln’s re-Birthday) - but don’t bust yer hump about it!

Thanks, everyone, for the input.

23

You are correct about the ABS being useful, when it works. It's a shame that one small piece can kill that entire system.

I bought a 91 Thunderbird, once. It had ABS failure. The brakes were like standing on a cement block and would barely stop the vehicle. I found this out, at the first stop sign. It took 40 feet to stop at 20 MPH. I limped it home and called my guy at Ford. At my cost, the entire unit was like $1600.00. It was about the size a of a good sized Diesel injection pump, or larger. Huge unit but I had an idea. I found a 91 T-Bird in the junkyard that had standard Brakes with a booster. I completely removed the booster set up, and inside the vehicle, the brake pedal assembly, and transferred them to that vehicle. It worked like a charm. When I sold the car, I informed the new owner what I had done. The ABS light stayed on but big deal. I had brakes.I understand that the science of ABS works well but you do know that, like stated above, we've been stopping cars forever with out it. Heck, just don't drive it in in-climate weather. ( That is, if you can't get the part)

Sorry that I couldn't help you find the correct part though. hopefully Kevin's people can help.

Best of luck, sir.

24

Another idea...

I wonder if there's a standard magnet and a friend with a 3D printer that could help?

25

I wonder if there's a standard magnet and a friend with a 3D printer that could help?

Or a precision metal fabricator / car guy who could be enlisted. The Tru-Arc brother occasionally does chassis fab work for Rahal, and a schooldays friend worked on the Rahal team for years in the same capacity. I bet they would have the expertise and equipment to improvise a solution.

Sounds like imposing, though, and ought to be silly expensive. One wonders if the problem of an old guy trying to keep an old car on the road is worth that much effort.


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