Miscellaneous Rumbles

Another rant…..

1

I hate the overuse of cymbals! I often feel nauseous, loose balance when my drummer goes off on the cymbals. It’s no joke.... I’ve walked out of live shows because the drummer continually hits the bell of a cymbal, sending me into a spin. I hate cymbals!

2

And get off my lawn.

(That said, I think china cymbals should be registered, licensed, and regulated.)

3

Keith Moon's probably not your guy then!?

4

I don't mind the bell of the cymbal as much as the crash. There are hybrid cymbals that sound like someone beating on a trash can lid. Piccolo snares are also as bad for your hearing as crash cymbals. Drum shields are your friend.

5

I don't like symbols either. I wish people would just come right out and say what they're talking about.

6

Protey! I have a visceral dislike of tambourines; many who use them make the additional sin of NOT KNOWING WHEN TO USE THEM. I haven't developed an aversion to cymbals, yet. So, I so get this.

7

For me it’s an actual physical response to the dreaded noise makers!

It doesn’t really bother me on recorded music, it’s in live situations . Seems that the balance of volume potential is drastically different from an acoustic drum and a cymbal.
Who came up with the damn things in the first place?

8

I don't mind the bell of the cymbal as much as the crash. There are hybrid cymbals that sound like someone beating on a trash can lid. Piccolo snares are also as bad for your hearing as crash cymbals. Drum shields are your friend.

– wabash slim

AH!!! drummer terrariums! (terraria?)

Hate ‘em!

9

Every drummer should come with one! (a shield)

11

Imagine if my amp was always on 10 and it was up to me to control volume by hitting the strings softer or harder? In other words, “I’m the volume knob.” Rock music would have died before it ever started.

12

Peter Gabriel has been one of my favorite artists for a very long time. It’s only been recently that I noticed most of his songs have very sparse cymbals. I was reading that Peter Gabriel came up with the “gated reverb” sound that became popular in 80’s music.

I love the drum work in his album “Security.” Wish there was a way to get that sound in a small venue. I suppose an electric kit would be the only way to accomplish it.

13

I hate the overuse of cymbals! I often feel nauseous, loose balance when my drummer goes off on the cymbals. It’s no joke.... I’ve walked out of live shows because the drummer continually hits the bell of a cymbal, sending me into a spin. I hate cymbals!

– Hipbone

Cymbal abuse, huh. Sounds like you have a heavy metal band or at least a metal drummer in your band.

I liken cymbal abuse to Reverb or Chorus abuse or even tremolo bar abuse.

14

Cymbal abuse, huh. Sounds like you have a heavy metal band or at least a metal drummer in your band.

I liken cymbal abuse to Reverb or Chorus abuse or even tremolo bar abuse.

– ThePolecats

I do covers, most of which are alternate 80’s songs. My drummer thinks he is playing an arena, when in fact we play small clubs.

15

I blame the rise of semiotics in universities in the '80s. We need to shift the paradigm. Let drummers use signs instead.

16

AH!!! drummer terrariums! (terraria?)

Hate ‘em!

– tubwompus

They're often a necessity, tho, especially in a theatrical or recording setting. There are only a couple of ways of dealing with a heavy handed drummer. Shields are the simplest. I do like the term "drummer terrariums".

17

You don’t have a cymbal problem. Cymbals are benign, blank discs of possibility on which a sensitive drummer can evoke a myriad of textures, shadings of light and dark, accents and colors and impulses. Cymbals are where all the exotic mysteries in percussion come from, the sparkling celestial counterpoint to all the propulsive sturm und drang of the chthonic engine room down below.

You don’t have a cymbal problem. You have a bad drummer problem.

The worst drummer I ever gigged with was the vaunted and self-appointed holy man who reigned over the local high school’s nationally renowned percussion ensemble.

We had to use him at a fraternal club gig when our regular (and blissfully supple) percussion artist missed a gig. The man had no dynamics, no feel, no groove, no pulse, and played every song in martial lockstep like a genre carcicature from the bandbox of a Lowery organ (or an early drum machine, take your pick).

Cymbals were his favorite Teutonic weapon. He knew that when it came to instrumental breaks, no matter the genre, it was time to lay into Gatling tattoos on the bells of his Zildjian 40” saucers. We figured that out and started leaving out the solos.

At the blessed end of the gig, we beat him to a pulp with his hickory sticks, and left him with his cymbals stretching Joker grins from various bodily orifices.

That’s what you should do.

18

I concur with Proteus. I'[d take one of his cymbals and smack him hard right across the forehead and tell him, when he regains consciousness, that that's what he can look forward to every time he plays them like they're a weapon. Couple of times should do the trick.

19

You don’t have a cymbal problem. Cymbals are benign, blank discs of possibility on which a sensitive drummer can evoke a myriad of textures, shadings of light and dark, accents and colors and impulses. Cymbals are where all the exotic mysteries in percussion come from, the sparkling celestial counterpoint to all the propulsive sturm und drang of the chthonic engine room down below.

You don’t have a cymbal problem. You have a bad drummer problem.

The worst drummer I ever gigged with was the vaunted and self-appointed holy man who reigned over the local high school’s nationally renowned percussion ensemble.

We had to use him at a fraternal club gig when our regular (and blissfully supple) percussion artist missed a gig. The man had no dynamics, no feel, no groove, no pulse, and played every song in martial lockstep like a genre carcicature from the bandbox of a Lowery organ (or an early drum machine, take your pick).

Cymbals were his favorite Teutonic weapon. He knew that when it came to instrumental breaks, no matter the genre, it was time to lay into Gatling tattoos on the bells of his Zildjian 40” saucers. We figured that out and started leaving out the solos.

At the blessed end of the gig, we beat him to a pulp with his hickory sticks, and left him with his cymbals stretching Joker grins from various bodily orifices.

That’s what you should do.

– Proteus

Tim, that was erudite, articulately poetic comedy gold!

And of course, I’m aware of the self-appointed percussion sage of whom you speak and I’m dyin’ ova heeya!

20

Cymbals piss me off. I hate seeing them whacked so they end up vertical. Sounds awful, shrill. No matter how expensive they are, they sound like saucepan lids when you do that.

Impossible to record unless you close mic the rest of the kit. But I hate that sound. I like distant mics, a little natural room ambience, as heard by the human ear. When did you last listen to a snare with your ear pressed against it? Or your head in a bass drum?

Unfortunately, this will be read mainly by guitarists. There seems to be a trend of not being able to tell drummers what you really think. They seem a bit sensitive

21

Cymbals piss me off. I hate seeing them whacked so they end up vertical. Sounds awful, shrill. No matter how expensive they are, they sound like saucepan lids when you do that.

Impossible to record unless you close mic the rest of the kit. But I hate that sound. I like distant mics, a little natural room ambience, as heard by the human ear. When did you last listen to a snare with your ear pressed against it? Or your head in a bass drum?

Unfortunately, this will be read mainly by guitarists. There seems to be a trend of not being able to tell drummers what you really think. They seem a bit sensitive

– Vince_Ray

How much validity do most guitarists give to drummers’ opinions about the guitar tones and volumes, generally? Something I’ve often pondered.

22

Mr. Hipbone, What was your first rant? I must have missed it!

...------

23

You don’t have a cymbal problem. Cymbals are benign, blank discs of possibility on which a sensitive drummer can evoke a myriad of textures, shadings of light and dark, accents and colors and impulses. Cymbals are where all the exotic mysteries in percussion come from, the sparkling celestial counterpoint to all the propulsive sturm und drang of the chthonic engine room down below.

You don’t have a cymbal problem. You have a bad drummer problem.

The worst drummer I ever gigged with was the vaunted and self-appointed holy man who reigned over the local high school’s nationally renowned percussion ensemble.

We had to use him at a fraternal club gig when our regular (and blissfully supple) percussion artist missed a gig. The man had no dynamics, no feel, no groove, no pulse, and played every song in martial lockstep like a genre carcicature from the bandbox of a Lowery organ (or an early drum machine, take your pick).

Cymbals were his favorite Teutonic weapon. He knew that when it came to instrumental breaks, no matter the genre, it was time to lay into Gatling tattoos on the bells of his Zildjian 40” saucers. We figured that out and started leaving out the solos.

At the blessed end of the gig, we beat him to a pulp with his hickory sticks, and left him with his cymbals stretching Joker grins from various bodily orifices.

That’s what you should do.

– Proteus

I think I've met him - Efrem Cymbalist Jr.

24

Well, credit where due. His tempos were metronomic. The timing chain was unbreakable.

25

Well, credit where due. His tempos were metronomic. The timing chain was unbreakable.

– Proteus

And on the other side of "metronomic" we had a drummer in the late 50s/early 60s, who pleaded "Please, no more of that boom click click , boom click click jazz"


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