Miscellaneous Rumbles

Amp up, guitar down (volume).

26

This post will be a total waste of my time to write it and your time to read it, but here it is.

I max the guitar and leave the amp where it was when I shut it off yesterday.

Since I play in the bedroom only and just for me, I turn the vol down to where I can just hear the amp over the sound of the strings, and, there ya go.

– F107plus5

I understand Wade’s point, but this pretty much sums up the way I go too. Maybe a hair louder. Other times no amp at all.

27

Sorry Wade but I don't buy in to your technique. First reason is I have absolutely no use for "dirt" or distortion of any kind. How I use the controls on guitar and amp is totally the reverse from your style. My setup is based on how Chet did it. He said to put the volumes on the guitars set to 10 and then roll back the bridge pickup just enough to hear the edge reduced. Use the tone control to your liking and have the master tone set near or at flat out. Second reason that works for me is that I don't use any pedals at all. Obviously YMMV.

– Windsordave

Dave, I play all types of music, and I should have clarified that the technique I brought up is more typically used in rock music. I understand that the use of overdrive is not applicable, or desirable, in all styles of music, and I should have been a bit more clear on the application.

When I was a young buck, I played rock music exclusively, but as I matured as a player and my skills improved, I opened myself up many other styles of music.

I began to have an appreciation for softer melodic and fingerstyle music, that required only a bit of drive/gain and reverb for effect. But I still believe that native (guitar and amp) volume and tone control is essential, even to this type of music. Drive/gain, whether we hear it or not, is present in our instrument and equipment, and is a product of the guitar pickups and the guitar amplifier, we just use it differently in softer music. The electric guitar played completely dry, is not particularly attractive to my ears. It needs a bit of preamp drive/gain, to enrich the signal, and I like a touch of reverb as well.

In the end, every player needs to discover what works best for them, to each their own. There is no right or wrong way to set up your amp or play your electric guitar. If it works for you, then it is right for you. My intention was help those along who are interested in learning more about this fundamental technique, and perhaps get the most out of their electric guitar.

28

I've made a transition over the last +year. Before it was tube amp,sometimes with an overdrive, and reverb pedal. But I delved deep in the pedal scene with two things in mind,1.have fun with new(to me) sounds, and 2. Seeing the writing on the wall for many of the gigs I used to do,and working to get some balls going Without the Loudness. Number 1 has been a runaway success,#2 has yet to be tried by fire, but I think it doable. Just got to see if some of my notions about boosting mids on a equalizer with a hair of gain to cut through a band setting without peeling the paint off the wall works like I envision it. But something else I learned along the way that's germain to this thread, is that some really cool things happen with alot of pedals,especially lower gain dirt types when you use the master volume. As well I might add, varying your pick attack.

29

Opie brings up a good point about pick attack. I've notice a lot of players here are akin to that.

30

I just remembered one guitar I have where turning down the volume on the guitar works really well is the Epiphone Casino. There is a sweet spot between 2.5 and 3 that really clears up the P90s and gets them into HiLotron territory.

31

"Yes, I still want the Mesa Boogie Lonestar "

Me too... (no surprise!), but that would be my "rock" amp (right now it's a Hot Cat). Not sure how well these MV amps work with the whole theory of "rolling back the volume", it's always worked far better for me on amps withOUT a MV... like all the little single ended amps I've owned over the years (Epiphone one, Champion 600, Excelsior, now I have the new Harmony 8418).... these clean up GREAT. I have a PRRI, but I only use it for clean tones, with pedals for dirt, so the guitar stays on 10. My Hot Cat lead channel does not react as well as I'd like for "cleaning up" by turning back the guitar volume. BUT.... 1) it's my ROCK amp, and 2) it has a clean channel, which also does clean-ISH very well... so I'm covered either way.

But yes- a Lonestar. Ans a Swart AST MkII. Someday....someday.....

And someday I want to play your Tokai !!!!

– ruger9

I have used this technique on amps with MV, and it still works. I think it depends more on how touch sensitive the amp is. I’ve had success with my hot rod deluxe with the correct pots installed, a plexi superlead clone w/PPI MV, and classic 20 and 30 Peavys.

32

Just watched a Rick Beato interview with Tim Pierce where at the 20:50 point he does a great explanation/demonstration of the amp up tone thing. Actually the whole interview is a hoot.Link

33

Another point to make about the nature of a Gretsch, at least some of the older ones, the sweet spot on the volume knob is around 8.5-9. N’otherwords, just backed off a bit from 10. It’s as loud as 10 but has something different. It’s Gretsch-alicious. IMO.

34

Another point to make about the nature of a Gretsch, at least some of the older ones, the sweet spot on the volume knob is around 8.5-9. N’otherwords, just backed off a bit from 10. It’s as loud as 10 but has something different. It’s Gretsch-alicious. IMO.

– Suprdave

very true about that sweet spot.

35

Once the band feels safe to get back together and I have the opportunity to practice with the band and play gigs, I really want to try this.

36

All knobs on all equipment are there to be used. Use them and see what happens.

The one exception may be the knob to dial up the mute on Gretschs so equipped. But do try it once.

37

Great video, Opie! Thanks for sharing it. Tim Pierce is an amazing player, I'm glad to see him explaining the technique in detail. I've been following him for about a year now, and Rick Beato for three years. I bought the original Beato Book 2.0, and he's given me two updates for a donation of any amount. We're at the Beato Book 4.0 now. It's 690 pages, and completely covers all music theory. Out of appreciation for his work, I gave generous donations for the Beato Book updates.

The amp up guitar down technique has been overlooked by many of today's players, it's an amazing way to step up your game. But, I'm keen to observe "to each their own", whatever works best for you. There is no right or wrong way to deal with your guitar and amp setup, as long as it's working for you.

The very first words out of my first electric guitar mentors mouth was "it's all about volume control", and he schooled me, right off the bat, on how use the guitar volume effectively. When I started playing the electric guitar, there were only a few effect pedals available. We relied heavily on the amp up guitar down method to achieve good tone, and to go back and forth between rhythm and lead using the guitar volume. We were playing the rock music that is now called "Classic Rock".

As we got into the 1980's, pedal effects blossomed, and in my world, Boss ruled the playing field. I was mesmerized by all of the different effects that became available, and I bought a huge collection of Boss pedals.

I bought an Fender 75 Watt Lead amp with a switchable lead channel, and over the next decade, I drifted away from what I was originally taught. I was playing a lot of the early British metal and hard rock. I relied on my pedal effects more and more.

But in my heart, I started missing the old way. I was getting older and my taste in music was changing. I wanted to get back to the native sound of the guitar and amp. I had started playing more fingerstyle and I wanted a more pure tone. I packed away the majority of my effect pedals, all but my Boss OD-2 , my Boss DD-2, and my Cry Baby Wah Wah. My Fender amp had a spring reverb pan, and I used it. This was my basic setup for the past 25 years.

I upgraded my amp last year to a Boss Katana 100 watt 2x12, and I have the ability to add any type of modulation as needed, but I use modulation rarely. All I need is now in the amplifier, so all I ever add now is the Cry Baby.

38

Just watched a Rick Beato interview with Tim Pierce where at the 20:50 point he does a great explanation/demonstration of the amp up tone thing. Actually the whole interview is a hoot.Link

– Opie

Great video!


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