Miscellaneous Rumbles

American pronunciation: “solder”

76

I think the Favre pronunciation is primarily laziness. It's just a lot easier to pronounce the "R" before the "V." Otherwise you have to add another syllable, and ain't nobody got time for that. I understand that the "R" is omitted altogether in the French pronunciation. It would just be "Fahv."

77

Erbody in line. Get cha's tongues intonated right over cheer......

78

Aluminum is a well known difference but the English spelling was exactly that. The name was applied for but the Royal Society vetoed it on the dubious grounds that the precedent of "-ium" endings had already been set by other elements.

Place names, as Deke says, are interesting. Worcester is amusing but I prefer the Ohio town's spelling. Here, in Norfolk, we have e.g. Wymondham pronounced Windum and Happisburgh pronounced Haysbruh.

79

We have friends in Hughstun.

Many years in NYC have me now always saying Houseton.

I like beatbyrd's "cawncud", but when I moved to Boston I got lost looking for Concord Street.

I went to Concord High School...

Good thing I wrote it down phonetically, one stop at a gas station saved me from passing by the Exit for the 6th time...

80

I've done a lot of sodderin' in my life.....I guess I never knew what I was missin'

oh "L".

81

An hour ago, I was talking to a neighbor who said, "We pose tuh be at the meeting on Wednesday."

82

Tough enough trying to understand some rednecks at the best of times but you have to give up when they invent their own words.

From Jeff Foxworthy: "Didn't bring yer pickup widyadidya? (with you, did you?)

83

Way back when I was at highschool I played goalkeeper for a local soccer team. My friend was centre-forward, and he was from the north of England but had lived in Scotland for a while. Overall he sounded Lancashire. One match I pulled off a rather spectacular save and my pommy friend ran down and yelled "Ee ye jammy twat Rogers!". I looked at him, then said "I have no idea what you just said but it'll keep 'til after the match".

EE - oh. Ye - you. Jammy - lucky. Twat - um, jolly good person.

84

Q: What's the difference between Mick Jagger and a Scotsman?

A: Mick Jagger says "Hey You! Get off of my cloud!"
A Scotsman says, "Hey McLeod! Get off of my ewe!"

86

Just the variables of "you" will give someone headaches. You, y'all, all y'all, youse, you guys, you lot, you'uns.

87

I think the Favre pronunciation is primarily laziness. It's just a lot easier to pronounce the "R" before the "V." Otherwise you have to add another syllable, and ain't nobody got time for that. I understand that the "R" is omitted altogether in the French pronunciation. It would just be "Fahv."

– Afire

Certainly not! The French pronunciation is .... get that : Favre!
We have mute "e" (which is the case for the final e here), but omitting an "r" is certainly not something we do!

88

Certainly not! The French pronunciation is .... get that : Favre!
We have mute "e" (which is the case for the final e here), but omitting an "r" is certainly not something we do!

– Thomas

Exactly, as in the town Le Havre which is a port city greeting those coming from the English Channel to the Siene River.

89

BTW if you really want to pronounce Van Gogh correctly you have to kinda sound like you're hacking up to spit - G is Dutch is pronounced almost like R is in French - sorta kinda. It's a "CKHH" sound - we don't use the sound in English unless we are trying to work up a spit. And that's not really speech anyway. So Van Gogh is "Van Hoch", with both the G and the GH sounding like you are hacking up a spit.

A looooong way from "Van Go".

90

I think both Portuguese and Russian have an odd, rolling "RReeRRzzz" thing...

Why it is Hungarian and Finnish are linked makes no sense.

91

And how about Stephen sometimes pronounced as STEVEN ?

And Greenwich Village pronounced like Gren itch Village....??

92

The words for library (bibliotheca) and kitchen (kuchina) and beer are similar in many languages. At least we can get fed and drunk.

94

Most European languages are Indo-European in origin. That's why so many key words are similar in some ways. Exceptions are languages like Finnish, Hungarian and Basque. No-one knows where they came from. It's a fascinating subject to me.

Things like Greenwich being pronounced "Grenitch" go back the England. The British seem to love inventing long place names - or family names - then finding strange ways to make them sound shorter. Dalziel is a good example, being pronounced Deel. There is a village on the SW coast of England called Mouse Hole. Yup, you guessed it - it's pronounced "Mowzel". The name Mainwaring is pronounced Mannering. There are thousands of these.

95

I love names which aren't pronounced like they're spelled, i.e., Duquesne (doo-KAIN), Gautier (go-SHAY), Beauchamp (BEECH-um).

96

Duo jet, that's French for ya. C'est la vie.

The slang is what gets most newcomers to a language. Wouldja, couldja, dontcha, ain't or it's British cousin innit, I'd've, and other contractions drive some up a wall. Subtle variances can as well---look, soon, food, food. We have words that don't sound like they look, too---been. Words that have extra letters---often. Words that have too many letters---through, enough,---that don't sound the same. We have words that change pronunciation when you add something to them---you can't have manslaughter without laughter.

98

Gautier is not pronounced "go-SHAY" - rather "Go-tyay". Reminds me of how US football commentators say "noterrr daim" when the rest of the world says "not-re dahm".

FWIW "ain't" is an English word. Just as "Fall" as a season is originally English, so is ain't. The English originally used Fall for Autumn, but changed because the French l'Autumn was posher. In parts of England ain't was perfectly acceptable use, and in some parts bain't was used (short for be not rather than is not). But then along came Johnson and his ridiculously pedantic dictionary and these words were banished and English spelling began.

If you look at Shakespeare you will see that he spells words differently depending on who is saying them. That is because (A) he pre-dates dictionaries, and (B) because he is reflecting local dialects and pronunciation.

Languages change constantly. I think spelling should reflect that. Even as an Aussie, I watch documentaries from the 60s here in Australia and it is remarkable not just how slang has changed but how everyday pronunciation has changed in just 50 years. I'm sure it's the same in most countries.

I love Croatian - not because I can speak it but because I can't - sort-of. My wife's family is Croatian, and I have learnt how to pronounce things written in Croatian. So I can read their papers out loud and be understood by Croatians, even if I don't understand what I am saying myself. I'm sure it sounds very strange to a Croatian but they still understand it.

99

In Gautier, Mississippi, they say "go-SHAY"

100

And they are allowed to! It's their town, they can pronounce it how they want.


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