Miscellaneous Rumbles

American pronunciation: “solder”

51

And BTW, how do you do those partial quotes? I never could figure that one out....

52

worse is all you mid-west and east coaster weirdos that do not put "the" before your freeway & highway numbers. In California we take "THE 405" or merge onto "THE 91"!

ps. Aussies take all the piss out of a biker gang when you call them Bikies.

53

Ah, yes..THE 405, a Scenic byWAY!

Spent many an hour parked along there...

54

You only put "THE" in front of an Interstate number if you live on it. We in the Midwest have better things to do than spend all day in traffic.

Americans go to THE hospital, but Brits omit the "THE".

Why do people overpronounce the letter I? It's not Eye raq or Eye ran, it's not Eye-talian, either (not eye-ther).

Debacle drives me crazy. It's not de-BOCK-ul, it's deb-uh-cul. Just like oracle, barnacle, spectacle, miracle.

Newscasters usually have the worst pronounciations of all.

55

You only put "THE" in front of an Interstate number if you live on it. We in the Midwest have better things to do than spend all day in traffic.

Americans go to THE hospital, but Brits omit the "THE".

Why do people overpronounce the letter I? It's not Eye raq or Eye ran, it's not Eye-talian, either (not eye-ther).

Debacle drives me crazy. It's not de-BOCK-ul, it's deb-uh-cul. Just like oracle, barnacle, spectacle, miracle.

Newscasters usually have the worst pronounciations of all.

– wabash slim

I have only ever heard it pronounced de-BOCK -ul. If someone pronounced it as you're used to I'd have to ask what they're talking about.

The pronunciation that really bugs me is hearing SKED-ule pronounced SHED-ULE. Kids don't attend shoo-le, they attend skool. Sch is designed to be pronounced as sk, not sh. The ultimate proof of this lies with the pronunciation of Schizoid with Personality Disorder (SPD). if sch was supposed to be pronounced as sh, then this word would be pronounced as SHIT-zoid and I've never heard it pronounced that way!

56

Bikies are scary...

I think its just the western australians that pronounce the L in solder

57

Other than excessive use of first person plural sans plural, "us" Delawareans speak perfect English.

At least "Concord" isn't pronounced "Conkit", as our Revolutionary friends up in Beantown keep reminding us...

– Twangmeisternyc

I speak fluent Bostonian and "Concord" is pronounced "Cawncud". "Solder" is pronounced "Sawdah". "Gloucester" is pronounced "Glawstah".

And soda, soft drinks, soda pop, Coke, Pepsi, is all "tawnick". "Beer" is "Beeyah".

Laydah.....

58

I have only ever heard it pronounced de-BOCK -ul. If someone pronounced it as you're used to I'd have to ask what they're talking about.

The pronunciation that really bugs me is hearing SKED-ule pronounced SHED-ULE. Kids don't attend shoo-le, they attend skool. Sch is designed to be pronounced as sk, not sh. The ultimate proof of this lies with the pronunciation of Schizoid with Personality Disorder (SPD). if sch was supposed to be pronounced as sh, then this word would be pronounced as SHIT-zoid and I've never heard it pronounced that way!

– Windsordave

Really? What do you make of GretSCH then?

60

Gretsch and the other sch words are German. English rules don't apply,even tho the languages are related. Learned that in shool.

61

Winsordave, I'd be wary of using a single example of "ultimate proof" of how to pronounce any word. Schedule is a tough one. I sometimes say Sk, sometimes Sh, I think for me it depends on the context. I've always thought one was UK and one was US, but I've no idea which is which.

My father was very intolerant of variations in pronunciation, but I'm rather fascinated by it. Here in England you don't have to travel many miles to find a dialect and accent markedly different from one's own. My wife and I were born and bred less than 10 miles apart, but we speak very differently (at least we did, 25 years together has homogenised us somewhat).

There are fascinating old English names and places whose pronunciation is nothing like their spelling, for example:

Names

  • Featherstonehaugh - pronounced Fanshaw
  • Beauchamps - pronounced Beecham
  • Menzies - pronounced Mingies (soft G)

Places

  • Anything with ...cester in it - pronounced ...ster
  • Trottescliffe - pronounced Trozley
62

Gretsch and the other sch words are German. English rules don't apply,even tho the languages are related. Learned that in shool.

– wabash slim

English rules barely apply to English.

63

Anyone from eastern or central Massachusetts, knows that "Worcester" is pronounced "Wis-duh".

64

I always thought that skedule was American, shedule was English. So when my mum (mom) worked for Alcoa (an American company) and she would have to talk at regular intervals on the radio with the geologists out in the field, those calls were called "skeds". Because Alcoa was American. But she still always said shedule for schedule.

There are a lot of words which are pronounced differently from the US and UK. One example is forehead - US: four - head, UK: forr-ed. One theory is that the US pronunciation goes back to the use of spelling books in the US,where kids at school would read out "F-O-R-E, fore, H-E-A-D, head, fore-head".

FWIW people in the east of Australia talk really weird and have strange names.

65

Oh, and when my mum (mom) worked at Alcoa the big boss from the US would come to have meetings. He always asked for coffee with cream, so mum (mom) would rush down the street and buy cream. He would then remark about how creamy the coffee was. Mum had no idea that Americans don't say "white coffee" if they want milk in it.

66

Deke. On the subject of local village names. My cousin moved from Huddersfield, UK to Melbourne Australia.

His new boss took him out for a drink in the local pub. while they were stood chatting at the bar , the barman came over to him and asked what part of England he came from. Huddersfield, Yorkshire,he replied. The barman wrote the name of a village called Slaithewaite and asked him how it was pronounced. "Sl- how-it" my cus said. Only someone who lived round there would know that said barman and gave him free drinks for the next month!!!!

67

Winsordave, I'd be wary of using a single example of "ultimate proof" of how to pronounce any word. Schedule is a tough one. I sometimes say Sk, sometimes Sh, I think for me it depends on the context. I've always thought one was UK and one was US, but I've no idea which is which.

My father was very intolerant of variations in pronunciation, but I'm rather fascinated by it. Here in England you don't have to travel many miles to find a dialect and accent markedly different from one's own. My wife and I were born and bred less than 10 miles apart, but we speak very differently (at least we did, 25 years together has homogenised us somewhat).

There are fascinating old English names and places whose pronunciation is nothing like their spelling, for example:

Names

  • Featherstonehaugh - pronounced Fanshaw
  • Beauchamps - pronounced Beecham
  • Menzies - pronounced Mingies (soft G)

Places

  • Anything with ...cester in it - pronounced ...ster
  • Trottescliffe - pronounced Trozley
– Deke Martin

Your right Deke, I/we should leave the word ultimate to less still-discussionable topics. Let's say it's a more convincing example.

I have no response for pronunciation for GretSCH. Perhaps it's being at the end of the word that makes it different somehow, who knows?

Regarding the several comments that sked-ule was a North American pronunciation and shed-ule British. I grew up in southern Ontario in the '50's/60's and we were taught and used sked-ule. Without exception, the Brits living in Ontario and there were lots of them back then, always pronounced it shed-ule. Down through the years in NA, I no longer hear this distinction.

Your names and places list is remarkable!

68

Deke. On the subject of local village names. My cousin moved from Huddersfield, UK to Melbourne Australia.

His new boss took him out for a drink in the local pub. while they were stood chatting at the bar , the barman came over to him and asked what part of England he came from. Huddersfield, Yorkshire,he replied. The barman wrote the name of a village called Slaithewaite and asked him how it was pronounced. "Sl- how-it" my cus said. Only someone who lived round there would know that said barman and gave him free drinks for the next month!!!!

– davedee

Melbourne is a nice part of the world. I should know, I live here!

69

hi there Adsy 81. good to here from you. My cus always speaks well of the area, says the lifestyle "down under" is brill! He's been there about 20 years now but still can't get used to eating Turkey for Christmas dinner sat out on the veranda in only his shorts!

70

I was born in Melbourne. One of the great cities of the world. I've hardly lived there - left when I was four - but been there many times for work and holidays and it's a wonderful city. There is a Melbourne accent but mainly only if you went to a private school. Melbourne has it's quirky turns of phrase - a road verge is the "nature strip". The convenience store is the milk bar. And Melburnians are some of the most sports mad people in the world.

71

Sodder sounds stupid. Like when you got such a snotty nose that you can't say solder. But it seems to be correct.

I think the name Dalziel is pronounced "Deal". The language police should step in and stop that silliness.

Americans pronouncing European names, that makes my toes curl. Koch is pronounced like Kotsh which means puke. That's not correct. It's pronounced like the CH in Loch of Loch Ness. Same goes for Van Gogh. Van Go? Who the fart is Van Go? Van Gogh is again pronounced like Loch Ness too. The list goes on Anne Frank will become Ann Frank pronounced like Enn Frenk. Bwah! Greek names like Homerus: Homer... The -us belongs to those names. One of the worst was Terry Schiavo. She was called Sjaivo. Yeah just flip the a and i why not. Ski-a-vo. Italian. Not that hard. But I give up.

72

Wow...and I thought I could rant!

Or should it now be "wrant"?

73

It should be wrent. And don't pronounce it rong or I shall explode.

74

Explain the pronunciation of Brett Favre please.

75

You haven't heard a mispronounciation till you listen to a Hoosier trying to pronounce a Polish name. If a phone solicitor even comes close to getting my name right, I won't hang up on him instantly.

As to Brett Favre, it does seem sad when you can't pronounce your own name correctly.


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