Miscellaneous Rumbles

American pronunciation: “solder”

1

Why do people from the USA pronounce solder "sodder"? Where I live sodder is something unkind to say about a woman. (Sod her) What happened to the L in solder?

For the most part I can understand US pronunciation. But this one baffles me.

2

I've never heard it pronounced any other way than "sodder". Same thing with salmon ("sammon").

3

That's how my daddy days it and his daddy before him. I'm sure there are Australian pronunciations that baffle me. Let me have my coffee first.

4

That's how my daddy days it and his daddy before him. I'm sure there are Australian pronunciations that baffle me. Let me have my coffee first.

– Otter

Nicole Kidman, when she says "no" emphatically: "NOWIEE!"

5

Does she tell you no emphatically a lot, crow?

6

Does she tell you no emphatically a lot, crow?

– Otter

Quite literally, every time I ask.

7

Want to talk about aluminum?

8

Most American speakers don't pronounce the "L" in words like salmon, walk, or talk. "Polka" is a word in which some speakers pronounce an "L" sound and others leave it out. Never have I heard any American speaker say anything other than "sodder" when talking about that melty stuff we put on electrical connections.

English is a strange and difficult language, made even less comprehensible by separate linguistic evolutions in scattered colonies all over the planet. Shifts in the pronunciations of various form of English usually occur in vowels, but your example of a consonant is an interesting one.

A friend tells the story of attending a lecture by a visiting Australian professor. The first 20 minutes involved a statistical analysis of research involving "miles." My friend was profoundly confused, wondering why the lecturer was so focused on distances. Only when the professor began talking about "femiles" did everything become clear.

9

Jimmy, I think it is just the ways of the English language. All of my Aussie friends have a hell of a saying "schedule". It usually comes out some word with all everything mushed together: "shedgshool" is usually what I hear.

Like my friend say(or something like it: Why would we just walk right in here and start talking about making a silent L? It's halfway to madness to imagine we could do such a thing.

Or the pronunciation of "your" vs. "hour"......tons of madness.

10

Haha! Well you should hear the New Zealand accent! Although I suspect that most people who are not Aussie or Kiwi could pick the difference, to us it's generally obvious. Kiwis really play musical chairs with the vowels.

I only recently discovered that you folks in the US said "sodder" after watching youtube videos. It just struck me as odd - never thought that of course we don't pronounce the L in talk, walk, salmon etc. Or the T in often - although some people do.

I love all the differences in pronunciation and word meanings/use around the world. It's what makes English such a rich language - although confusing when travelling. I had a job in New Zealand a few years ago and was photographing a burly Maori security guard in Auckland. I had trouble understanding my client when she said to the guard "Git rud of the pin!" He had a pen in his pocket she objected to.

11

Most American speakers don't pronounce the "L" in words like salmon, walk, or talk. "Polka" is a word in which some speakers pronounce an "L" sound and others leave it out. Never have I heard any American speaker say anything other than "sodder" when talking about that melty stuff we put on electrical connections.

English is a strange and difficult language, made even less comprehensible by separate linguistic evolutions in scattered colonies all over the planet. Shifts in the pronunciations of various form of English usually occur in vowels, but your example of a consonant is an interesting one.

A friend tells the story of attending a lecture by a visiting Australian professor. The first 20 minutes involved a statistical analysis of research involving "miles." My friend was profoundly confused, wondering why the lecturer was so focused on distances. Only when the professor began talking about "femiles" did everything become clear.

– Viper

It's a good thing Mercans and Strayans like each other.

12

It's just like the military rank colonel that sounds like kernel. Go figure.

My five year old grandson is learning to read. Words with "-ight" and "-ought" give him issues. English is a goofy language, kid.

We had an Ethiopian guy on our stage crew. Good, food, look and such could drive him crazy.

The real problem is that English is comprised of many other languages and regional differences also make an impact. In Indiana alone, we have at least three distinct accents. I'd moved 100 miles south and was accused of being a "furnur".

As to words not sounding like they are spelled, let's discuss the French, OK? And Polish, even when spoken politely, can bruise the innocent.

13

wabash slim - It's just like the military rank colonel that sounds like kernel. Go figure.

Better not discuss the word soldier sounding like soljer.

14

In Arkansas, the "L" is silent on words you're supposed to pronounce with an "L" and pronounced on words which don't contain an "L", i.e., "That thar EVIS, ah just love HILM!"

15

Some regional dialects are such that even the locals don't understand when not knowing the full context. I worked with a woman form Arkansas who asked for directions in her home state and was told to turn when she got to the "Far Tar" (?) ...that turned out to be "Fire Tower".

17

As a yankee teenager in a band touring the south in the 1970s, I kept meeting people who referred to a place they called Melfus. It wasn't until it was mentioned in reference to Sun Records that I figured out what they meant.

18

It's a good thing Mercans and Strayans like each other.

– jeffed

That's "Strines," mite!

And don't get me started on "Worcester" (pronounced Wooster, innit?)

19

It's erbal, Herb.

– Deed Eddy

Ha, this one kind of relates to me. I pronounce "human" with no "h" to be heard and instead sounds like "youmin". Everyone catches it and makes fun of me for it!

20

Now you guys have me wondering what to use to reconnect this pot...

21

wabash slim - It's just like the military rank colonel that sounds like kernel. Go figure.

Better not discuss the word soldier sounding like soljer.

– crowbone

Outside of North America,that's pronounced "Mil'try".

22

A couple of years ago we visited Glasgow. I still don't know what they were speaking.

23

My wife always bugs me about my Connecticut pronunciation of aqua, "ACK-wuh" (as in "track"). She says "AHK-wuh" (as in "dock").

24

Can someone from England find for me the "f" in lieutenant?

25

All this makes me thirsty for some "Wooder"

Are you hungry? "Jeet yet?"

"Get summp'n? Aiight"

Yep. Jersey boy here.


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