Miscellaneous Rumbles

A Bobby Dazzler!

26

"a Bobby dazzler". Well there's an expression I've never, ever heard of in any context. It has to be before my time, and I go back quite a ways.

– Windsordave

You don’t watch The Curse of Oak Island.

28

the striations definitely are deliberate ornamentation. along with the (cast?) floral border that makes it some kind of manufactured consumer good on the higher end of the market of the time. i doubt that many folks in Gold Rush days had a set of gold tableware. seems more likely to be part of some womens' grooming accessory, perhaps a comb or hand mirror w/handle.

29

It's more easterly than Lancashire... Newcastle.

30

You don’t watch The Curse of Oak Island.

– hammerhands

No I don't. It strikes me as a very dragged out storyline with no ending.

As for the expression, I grew up in Southern Ontario where there was a huge British influence and never heard it. Something outstanding, special or unique was referred to as "a real Duesy!" This was a compliment to Duesenberg automobiles, considered in North America as good as it gets.

31

No I don't. It strikes me as a very dragged out storyline with no ending. hammerhands

I thought the same thing about "The Curse of Oak Island". I enjoyed it very much at first, but it just kept dragging on and on and.....

It's a very interesting story, but eventually lost my interest too.

I first heard the expression "Bobby Dazzler", while I was stationed in in the city of Mons, Belgium, at SHAPE (NATO), 1981 - 84. I worked with a lot of British soldiers, and some of them used the term for anything that had a brilliant appearance.

32

No I don't. It strikes me as a very dragged out storyline with no ending.

As for the expression, I grew up in Southern Ontario where there was a huge British influence and never heard it. Something outstanding, special or unique was referred to as "a real Duesy!" This was a compliment to Duesenberg automobiles, considered in North America as good as it gets.

– Windsordave

The guy on "Oak Island" that used that term is British. In the year and a half that I spent in England, I never heard that term.

"Duesy" is accurate. "Runs like a Champ" refers to another Indiana built car---a Studebaker Champion. Word/phrase origins are interesting.

A lot of those type of shows are just TV click bait. "See what happens next!" Many feature so-called "enhanced episodes" with a little extra footage. Formulaic.

33

the striations definitely are deliberate ornamentation. along with the (cast?) floral border that makes it some kind of manufactured consumer good on the higher end of the market of the time. i doubt that many folks in Gold Rush days had a set of gold tableware. seems more likely to be part of some womens' grooming accessory, perhaps a comb or hand mirror w/handle.

– macphisto

Mirror makes more sense. It's so small maybe a decorative hair comb. Something pretty to keep a ladies hair in place.

34

A typical Oak Island segment:

Nothing happens, they tell you nothing will happen in the next segment, they go to commercial, they tell you nothing happened in the previous segment, remind you nothing happened in a previous episode and try to connect that with an improbable theory.

What's really at the bottom of the pit is years, lives and several hard earned fortunes. It's a big hole where they get bigger and bigger trucks to dump money in. Or, when you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.

It is still pretty cool, the brothers remind me of my uncle. I'm suspicious of the "Bobby Dazzler" guy, like when they found the cross, you see him reach up to his belt an extra time for no reason. So were they recreating the scene, was that sleight of hand?


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