Other Players

Proteus, Does This Set Your Hair On Fire?

51

i liked the first couple of Eagles albums OK, though their self-absorption makes them a little difficult to enjoy today. their technical inadequacy also is problematic...Leadon was barely a lead guitar player, and i can play drums as well as Henley and i'm not even a drummer. Henley complained that when he asked Glyn Johns, who produced the first 2 albums, to "make me sound like John Bonham" Glyn replied "you don't play like John Bonham." He thought the Eagles were a nice enough little country-rock band who shouldn't try to punch above their weight. i think he was right. if you're going to try to rock, the first thing you need is a competent rhythm section, and the Eagles never had that. maybe that's part of why they're so popular...white people usually turn the bass down and only pay attention to the top line.

52

GET OUTTA MY CAB!

As a child of the ‘70s, I don’t ever need to hear another song by The Eagles or Fleetwood Mac ever again.

53

Ugly dudes with bad hair? Really? Cheap shot from the peanut gallery that has nothing to do with the music from these guys. LOL

Calling a light-hearted jest a cheap shot is...well...a cheap shot. In this case though, not at a band but at a fellow member. LOLOLOLOL...or, whatever.

– Strummerson

"Take It Easy" Strum, it's an Eagles thread. No need to victimize yourself.

But if you insist, you're a "Victim of Love." Lmao

54

GET OUTTA MY CAB!

As a child of the ‘70s, I don’t ever need to hear another song by The Eagles or Fleetwood Mac ever again.

– Junior Q Man (Ryan M)

Mentioning these 2 bands in the same sentence brings a lot to the imagination. We know the "holier than thou" duo of Henley and Frey were heavy-handed as far as direction, giving orders, telling Joe Walsh where to stand on stage, etc..... But can you imaging the friction if Buckingham cut an album and went on tour with them? Ohhhhhhhh baby drama galore!

Imagine if you were playing with all 3 and think about who would get on your nerves first....which of the above mentioned 3 would make you drink as much as Joe Walsh in his heyday?!?!

55

"Take It Easy" Strum, it's an Eagles thread. No need to victimize yourself.

But if you insist, you're a "Victim of Love." Lmao

– J(ust an old Cowboy)D

Victimize myself?

Don't ever change.

56

A. I guess that greatness is in the eye of the beholder. They were commercially great in that they have 2 out of the top 3 records in greatest number sold.

B. What pigeonhole can they be stuffed into if not rock?

C. Agreed. Frey was from Detroit and Henley from Texas. Leadon and Felder from Florida and Meisner from Nebraska. They just happened to all be living in Los Angeles when they formed.

D. Ouch! I like Vince Gill.

– Ric12string

A. Budweiser beer sells well too, which does not automatically make it good beer.

B. (Eye-rolling) Pop Rock

C. Fun fact: their debut album was recorded in England.

D. He's also a scratch golfer.

57

Ah, the Eagles: incredibly successful therefore hated by many here who never experienced the transition from r ‘n’ r to hippie rock to early country rock to these bad guys.

It’s the same here with the devil incarnate himself: Clapton.

Both acts were consummate musicians.

Music transcends all of that supercilious rubbish and means a lot to millions.

It is also great music. That you rockabillies don’t like it doesn’t invalidate it rather it shows your inability to live and let live in the very poor light of your narrow mindedness.

The last Eagles gig we were at they rocked harder than just about any other band we’ve seen yet most of you guys wouldn’t have gone because of your prejudice against success.

The Eagles were a darned good band. Period.

58

They were. I won't argue about who "rocks" harder, because who knows what that means, but I don't deny the Eagles' talent, skill, production, pro songwriting chops, or success. I think they wasted the songwriting skill in trivially navel-gazing a decadent lifestyle rather than addressing anything universal in the "human condition" (as good songs sometimes do)...but maybe Steely Dan did as well, and I hold them in the highest of esteem. (In fairness, SD's lyrics and the narratives were not only real poetry - whatever that is, Eagles lirks aren't - but also much more cleverly suggested much more interesting stories about much more interesting characters.)

Eagles just leave me lukewarm. Maybe lukecool. Which sounds all Cool-hand Lukey, which is cooler than the Eagles. So let's say tepid. They're a tepid band.

And for the record, you don't have to be a hidebound rockabilly not to love the Eagles. My rockabilly bonafides are shaky to non-existent...and I can do without them.

59

I once saw a Joe Walsh interview that discussed his role in The Eagles.

For the prior 18 months to his arrival they were in utter turmoil, and he had nothing to do with it, nor would he be part of it in his deal to join...

He was there to hold them together as long as possible as they were "printing money" despite their foolishness and petty gripes between each other.

But, then, he commented that Don, Glenn, and Randy, as well as the other Don, could sing like Angels. Then add Tim, Angels +++....

Their thing was bigger than his thing without a doubt...and that made it worth participation.

61

"Ah, the Eagles: incredibly successful therefore hated by many here who never experienced the transition from r ‘n’ r to hippie rock to early country rock to these bad guys."

with all due respect, Richard, that's BS. i don't even listen to 'billy; lately i've been all about Gomez, Slowdive, Joy Division, and The Fall. i love good country-rock from the Byrds, Burritos, Poco, NRPS...but i'm sorry, the Eagles were/are a bunch of pretentious poseurs who back in the day couldn't play their way out of a paper bag. just listen to bootlegs from the 70s.

62

I worked one of their shows on their first tour. They sounded great, but were totally apathetic to the crowd. "Just give us the check and we'll be going," kind of attitude. Poco was the warm up band---and got the final encore---and made a lot of new Poco fans. The Eagles wound up near the top of my "Biggest Disappointment Bands" list.

63

Wow, summa you guys know how to get angry I guess Bax needs to rewrite the rules - No Religion, No politics, No Eagles.

Were the Eagles the greatest rock band? No, because they were not a rock band.

Were they the greatest country band? No, please see above.

Were they the greatest country-rock band? Well, I guess you'd have to define country-rock first, but I wouldn't call the Eagles rocky enough to be country-rock. Certainly not in CCR or Skynrd territory.

Whether anyone is the 'greatest' anything is a totally personal point of view and means nothing.

I really don't see what the big deal is. I like The Eagles and if they came on the radio I would turn it up, not off. I totally get that they're not for everybody, but why the vitriol?

64

It is okay to not like the Eagles' music. Or to say that they were a little too self-indulgent in their lyrical themes. That we all don't like the same thing is part of the spice of life.

But, to suggest that they were not very good players is perhaps a bit unfair. Bernie Leadon was actually a very good guitar and banjo player who managed to wield a B-bender Tele pretty darn good. His background was in bluegrass music and that was evident in his manner of playing.

Don Felder was actually a very fine guitarist who also played great slide guitar and who played pedal steel guitar. You can also hear him playing mandolin on some of their recordings. Again, you may not have liked his playing style, but it is hard to say that he was a lame player after he recorded songs like One of These Nights or Hotel California.

At one time (during the first five years of their collective career), I was an Eagles fan. I particularly liked the early country and bluegrass-flavored music. As they moved into more electrified sounds, such as on their album On The Border, I moved with them and enjoyed their increased rock sound. They still had some amazing vocal harmonies, which was so much of my interest in the band.

With the release of Hotel California, and then again with The Long Run, while I still enjoyed their songs, I was beginning to grow a little weary of the band. I am not sure just why. Perhaps it was because the songs just weren't as memorable to me. But, when they regrouped again for the Hell Freezes Over tour, I went to see them again and enjoyed the songs on that album.

What has put me off the most about them, I think, in recent years is their ticket prices. I think that ticket prices in excess of $200 or $250 is a bit much. I get it that that may not be the original prices that tickets were sold at and that brokers may be the cause of bumping up the admission prices, but it still is the effective price to see the band. And I know that touring with a major band is a very expensive proposition what with stage crews, sound and lighting, travel costs, etc. But, you can see some pretty good bands who are able to tour with ticket prices of only $75.00 to $85.00.

When they came out with the 2007 album Long Road Out of Eden, the songs just weren't interesting enough to hold my attention. They so often seemed dreary and ponderous rather than enthusiastic and fun.

It also didn't help that I was playing in a band with a guy who idolized the Eagles and two or three other artists and that was all that he wanted to play.

So, I take nothing away from the band. They wrote extraordinary songs for their era, they played and sang those songs very well, and they were entertaining. But, as with many other bands from my youth, my tastes have moved on in some measure.

65

Ticket prices will find their equilibrium as it’s a function of demand. If ticket prices are in excess of demand there will be empty seats.

This on the other hand...

68

I confess to being Eaglenorent about the mechanics of the band, thus whether this guy or that guy is or was a bad player. I don't think I could name all the members at any point in time. Maybe I could, but only because I've seen the names bandied about. But who did what? Who even WROTE what? No clue. My level of interest didn't compel me to learn more.

I know Joe Walsh became one of the guitarists in 1976, which - after I wondered at his sudden fall in degree of cool - momentarily made the band more interesting to me, because come ON, Ohio boy, Funk 49, Asshton Park, James Gang Rides Again. And I like Joe's playing when I can distinguish it in the Eagles - the only wit they ever showed - and I like his solo career. I like Joe Walsh. I'm a Joe Walsh liker. Don't you like Joe Walsh? Life's been good to me so far, too.

And I know Don Henley played drums. I know this because I became friends with ex-King Crimson (and Dylan, and more) drummer Ian Wallace toward the end of his life, and learned he played drums on Henley's solo albums - and on his solo tours. I thought having been a drummer's preferred drummer conferred wonder on Wallace, and perhaps suggested what Henley thought of his own drumming. So it stuck in my mind that Henley drummed. How well he drummed in the Eagles, I don't know. I guess competently enough not to wreck the records, which were about playing parts in the minutest extreme, not about inspired chopifying or the killer fill.

I like (and own) Henley's solo material, self-righteous pretentiousness notwithstanding. I guess it's more "rock" than the Eagles, whatever that means - and oft more musically adventurous. He also had the gall and audacity to address weightier lyrical themes than the band, which I liked. I didn't feel preached at, as I thought he was bitching at things that needed some bitching at. I like his stentorian voice, all dignity and authority - like an American Greg Lake.

Anyhow, I come not to trash the Eagles, just to clarify that I willingly shower them with benign indifference. Except for the a capella version of "Seven Bridges Road." I love that bit.

I can think of worse bands to be subjected to in hell.

69

Henley complained that when he asked Glyn Johns, who produced the first 2 albums, to "make me sound like John Bonham" Glyn replied "you don't play like John Bonham.

You got the story backwards. Henley wanted Johns to mic all his drums but Johns said I don’t mic all of Bonham drums to Henley replied I’m not John Bonham.

70

Proteus, Henley is/was a capable, if mildly uninspiring drummer. He could play the fills and keep tempo, but his strength was in his singing and songwriting.

Don Felder joined the band on the third album, On The Border, as Bernie Leadon was growing restless and was slowly starting on his way out. (He left the band after the fourth album.) Felder was specifically drafted into the band to harden their edge and give them more of a rock sound. Joe Walsh joined the band after Leadon left in time to play on the Hotel California album.

As for distinguishing between Felder's and Walsh's playing, if you can remember the guitar parts at the end of Hotel California that trade off parts, Felder begins that section and Joe's is the second one.

It is hard for me to understand those who say that the Eagles didn't play rock music. What would you call Life In The Fast Lane, Already Gone, Heartache Tonight, Victim of Love, The Long Run, James Dean, or Good Day In Hell? Clearly, they wrote a lot of folk-flavored songs, country-flavored songs, and pop songs, but, while not a hard rock band by any stretch of the imagination, they certainly also played and sang some rock songs. I give them credit for not just playing a single style of music, but trying to be more varied than that.

71

I generally don't have any trouble distinguishing JW's guitar - at least his leads. He plays with wit and panache.

72

Henley complained that when he asked Glyn Johns, who produced the first 2 albums, to "make me sound like John Bonham" Glyn replied "you don't play like John Bonham.

You got the story backwards. Henley wanted Johns to mic all his drums but Johns said I don’t mic all of Bonham drums to Henley replied I’m not John Bonham.

– Charlie Vegas

au contraire. this came from Henley himself, in Musician magazine while "Building the Perfect Beast" was being recorded:

And in 1973 during one track (on the first, unreleased version of On The Border), I said, Glyn can't you make me sound like John Bonham? And he sorta looked down his nose at me and said, "You don't play like John Bonham." I said, "Aw, I know, but turn it up, you know."

http://alumnus.caltech.edu/...

73

of course Felder and Walsh can play. after all, that's why they hired them. Bernie was a decent country guitarist (though you can't really tell from his Burritos work where he didn't show much), but clearly struggled as a soloist in the Eagles whenever he departed from the strict written parts. as i said before, check the tapes of their live shows as a four-piece, which are quite terrible.

i far, far prefer Joe's solo work to anything the Eagles ever did. "Barnstorm"...now, THERE'S the stuff.

74

Vince Gill is a whore!!!

HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!!

Oh man!

HA HA HA HA HA!!!

That was classic!

K

75

I guess they were good enough for Linda Ronstadt.

I feel like they crossed genres,too. Definitely more Rock with Walsh involved. To me, those were the best songs for them.

Regardless, when I'm in the right mood, their best of album does get some play, occasionally.

That stuff is like wine drinking music, for me.


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