Other Players

Imelda May Heads In A New Direction

51

That was very enjoyable.

– Ric12string

Agree completely. How do we know that the 'rockabilly' persona wasn't a deliberate image choice and that the 'softer' Imelda isn't the real 'her'. Watching these few videos has only made my appreciation of her talent grow.

Then again, I found Sha Na Na entertaining from the time they unexpectedly (to me) ran on stage in the Woodstock movie.

52

Wow... Ruger, If we ever meet, remind me that I owe you a beer for this one...

– Tartan Phantom

53
Would we call Bob Dylan a "fraud" even though he experimented with different musical directions?

Actually, Dylan was called something far nastier than fraud. If you recall your music history, when Dylan went electric he was called a "Judas." Great moment in music history.

54

Yes, and that makes no more sense than what you are saying about Imelda May.

Unlike what you have suggested, Thunderball, neither Imelda May now, nor Bob Dylan then, were trying to imitate anyone else. They each are/were on a musical journey to follow their own muse rather than staying in their comfortable little artistic niche where they know that they would always have an audience. That is courageous and is to be respected and admired.

55
Would we call Bob Dylan a "fraud" even though he experimented with different musical directions?

Actually, Dylan was called something far nastier than fraud. If you recall your music history, when Dylan went electric he was called a "Judas." Great moment in music history.

– Spiritwalker

He was indeed reviled by those who could not accept that an artist should be allowed by their audience to grow, and that it's then up to the audience to decide if they want to come along for the ride or not.

Rather, Dylan was reviled by those fans who wished to keep him forever locked into the 'political, folk singer, voice of a generation' pigeon-hole and could not accept that he did not want that to be the sum of his existence, musically or otherwise.

At that juncture, you have to ask if they were actually 'Dylan Fans", or just fans of how Dylan's music made them feel about themselves.

56

Yeah man, when Da Vinci painted the Mona Lisa... ugh... total sell-out!! What a fraud!!!

57

Ric12, I don't like artists who jump around. Indicates they are lost as an artist or worse, phonys. Spiritwalker

Really...good grief...by that standard, The Beatles, David Bowie, and many others are "frauds"....

LOL

(Is there anything larger than CAPS to make my point?)

58

To further emphasis my point....I've heard this girl discussed before at this forum, and I only thought...yeah, talented...but...and I may be committing blasphemy here a bit...but, I am not 'into" rockabilly...so, I would never have investigated further....(side note here though, when I met Kim Falcon doing her rockabilly shtick...I must say I was quite smitten....)

This Imelda May V2.0.....well, I would definitely listen further.

Nice Stuff!

And, to hear that T-Bone is producing her next music...well, that is only a plus....he does some great.....GREAT things with the people whom he chooses to produce!

59

nor Bob Dylan then, were trying to imitate anyone else
Oh, come on, now. Dylan not trying to imitate someone? Uhh, there was a band called The Beatles breaking huge and making remarkable music using electric guitars during 1965. Think maybe that had something to do with Dylan strapping on an electric guitar?

60
At that juncture, you have to ask if they were actually 'Dylan Fans",

Yes, those that felt betrayed by that electric guitar were HUGE Dylan fans. True Dylan fans. They loved what he was, what he was doing...that folk acoustic guitar troubadour thing. Why should they not feel betrayed and upset when the artist they love suddenly starts sporting electric rock instruments? If your favorite rock artist tomorrow goes Peruvian folk, you wouldn't feel a bit miffed?

Those that followed Dylan pre-'65 loved what he was. They enjoyed that style of music and Dylan was the best at it. To turn his back on that and go rock would certainly anger true fans. Why is that hard to understand? Why disparage those fans? Michael Jordan left basketball to play baseball. Should we all applaud his personal journey? Of course not. Bulls fans (all basketball fans) wanted to see Jordan doing what he was brilliant at...playing basketball. Same with Dylan and folk.

Three Judases:

61

Spiritwalker...question for you: Would you want the constraint put on you that you were never allowed to change or grow?

62

It's not 'hard to understand', it's just wrong. Dylan's fans did not own Dylan, any more than fans of Imelda May's Rockabilly work own Imelda May.

Dylan's fan's still had folk music available to them after Dylan changed his style of music, so why should he have allowed himself to be restricted to playing that type of music? Perhaps he felt he'd taken that direction as far as he wanted to go, or could go. It's his choice, and her choice in the case of Imelda May, not ours.

To tag on to Ruger's earlier point, if Michelangelo had restricted himself to being a sculptor, and kept making his statue of David over and over, we would not have his paintings and frescoes like the Sistine Chapel ceiling.

63

Folks, do you realize you are now comparing Imelda May...to Michelangelo!?!

My comparisons were Dylan to Michael Jordan. An apt comparison. Let's keep some sanity here, folks.

64

Spiritwalker...question for you: Would you want the constraint put on you that you were never allowed to change or grow?

– Toddfan

Of course we all wish to grow as people. I used to be intolerant of others' ideas. No longer. I have grown.

But the idea presented here that Imelda May is on a personal growth journey is flat out absurd and ridiculous.

65

I don't know. I think the girl just likes to sing.

66

nor Bob Dylan then, were trying to imitate anyone else
Oh, come on, now. Dylan not trying to imitate someone? Uhh, there was a band called The Beatles breaking huge and making remarkable music using electric guitars during 1965. Think maybe that had something to do with Dylan strapping on an electric guitar?

– Spiritwalker

Absolutely not. Anyone suggesting that Dylan's incorporation of an electric guitar into his peformances and recordings was somehow an attempt to imitate the Beatles would be certifiable. That is perhaps the most preposterous thing that I have heard you say on this site, Thunderball, which includes some pretty wacky stuff over the years.

By 1965, popular music had moved past folk music with its acoustic sound. Instead, all of the bands (including the Beatles) were using electric guitars. The only people who didn't seem to know that were those in attendance at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965. But, Dylan knew it and he was growing as an artist to maintain a contemporary sound.

Dylan as a lame imitator of the Beatles? Ha ha, good one, Thunderball.

67
By 1965, popular music had moved past folk music with its acoustic sound. Instead, all of the bands (including the Beatles) were using electric guitars. Dylan knew it and he was growing as an artist to maintain a contemporary sound.

Ric12, you just said it yourself: Dylan moved to electric to imitate those around him which included The Beatles. Different words, but you just said what I said.

What other reason would folkie Dylan pick up an electric guitar? Do you think he was given an endorsement deal from Fender? No. He wanted to be John Lennon. Look, I saw an interview with Dylan on "60 Minutes" ages ago and he made me laugh because he actually admitted he wanted to be a pop star. He wanted to be Elvis! It was funny to hear a generation's poet admit that, but it is really what he wanted. His voice, his look, and certainly his lyrics were the opposite of Elvis, but still Dylan wanted to be Elvis, wanted to be a pop star.

68

This whole thing is almost as much of a blasphemy as when someone takes a plain, old black guitar case and blings it up with gold piping to make it something it's not.

Oh, the humanity....

69

No, Thunderball, I never said that Dylan was imitating anyone. He was making his music contemporarily acceptable because no one was interested in listening to folk music save and except the people attending the Newport Folk Festival. Society had moved on. Because he wanted people to continue to listen to him, he embraced an electric sound, yet he continued to explore new areas. Case in point, Nashville Skyline from 1969.

But, "imitate"? That would be as stupid as saying that he wanted to be John Lennon. Oh, you said that too? Doubly stupid then.

70

Laughable. If anything, John wanted to be like Dylan.

71

No offense to her rockabilly stuff, but I MUCH prefer this.

I always felt her rockabilly stuff bordered on a caricature of the style, but then I could say that about 90% of modern-day rockabilly artists...

– ruger9

man have you flip flopped on this... tsk tsk and tisk!

72

Thanks Vince for the nice replies. Plus I had a good laugh.

73

Folks, do you realize you are now comparing Imelda May...to Michelangelo!?!

My comparisons were Dylan to Michael Jordan. An apt comparison. Let's keep some sanity here, folks.

– Spiritwalker

Too late for you, I'm afraid.

74

man have you flip flopped on this... tsk tsk and tisk!

– TheNocturneBrain.com™

Nah, not at all. While I love swing and rockabilly, I have ALWAYS had an issue with the "caricature"-ization of it. The only "swing" bands that came out of the revival I enjoyed were the BSO and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. All the others... Royal Crown Review, Cherry Poppin' Daddies, etc... were all like cartoon versions of the real thing. But then, I grew up listening to Glen Miller, Tommy Dorsey, and Benny Goodman, so I had already heard the best.

Setzer did something different with it: he mixed swing and rockabilly, and lead it with an electric guitar. But most of them: I think Setzer got it right with his song "Really Rockabilly"- just too much hair, too much lipstick, too short bangs, too much vintage clothing, it was like a film noir version of real rockabilly. Was never a fan of that.

Give me some Jerry Lee Lewis or Carl Perkins anyday over most of these people.

75

I'd rather listen to this ...which retains the musical spirit of JLL, at least- full of piss and vinegar

than this ...which is just silly

anyday.


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