Other Players

Gretsch could expand market share by embracing more female artists …

26

One thing this discussion brings up again... Why doesn't Gretsch make some chunkier necks?

– captainvideo

Amen - that said, Gretsch necks after the mid fifties never were all that chunky

27

Have to agree. Any man or woman with average/normal hands can find a modern Gretsch that is "playable". There's a ton of choices, styles, and finishes to choose from.

IMO, the "Gretsch Line up" is pretty player friendly for either sex.

Some folks do like the older style or chunky necks, which are harder to find than smaller feeling necks. That's probably a bigger problem than what this thread subject is about.

28

Amen - that said, Gretsch necks after the mid fifties never were all that chunky

– WB

I know that the 58 club necks were comfortable chunky style, there are two in the shop.

29

Geeta is making it happen with Gretsch.

31

Amen - that said, Gretsch necks after the mid fifties never were all that chunky

– WB

I always thought they got chunkier after the 50s. At least in my experience.

I've had a few 66 and 67 Tennesseans and Anniversaries that were chunkier than current models for sure. I have a '60 Anniversary that is the same as as a current model thin wise. .830 at first fret. Although it fattens up slightly more than modern necks around the 9th fret.

I've only played one 59 6120 and it had a pencil thin neck. I've also been told Duane's original '57 is super thin. At least in comparison to the mid 60's models I've had my hands around.

I'm sort of torn. I'd like Gretsch necks to get chunkier but I really dislike the trend of chunky necks. Every time someone hands me their partscaster and it has some ridiculous fat neck on it I can't for the life of me figure why one would do that.

But personal preferences aside. It should be an option to get a modern Gretsch with a chunky neck.

33

Amen - that said, Gretsch necks after the mid fifties never were all that chunky

– WB

Generally I'm in agreement with you with one exception....the Super Chet, at least the early ones. They rivaled a classical guitar that had a 2" wide neck at the nut - which flared imperceptibly to none BTW and a deep D-profile The SC neck was an true D-shape, in that it was not only deep, ie thick, but dead flat on the bottom. Mine is only the second one I've played or even heard of that's had the neck taken down substantially.

34

Dave, I'm not talking neck width - I mean neck depth.

35

I always thought they got chunkier after the 50s. At least in my experience.

I've had a few 66 and 67 Tennesseans and Anniversaries that were chunkier than current models for sure. I have a '60 Anniversary that is the same as as a current model thin wise. .830 at first fret. Although it fattens up slightly more than modern necks around the 9th fret.

I've only played one 59 6120 and it had a pencil thin neck. I've also been told Duane's original '57 is super thin. At least in comparison to the mid 60's models I've had my hands around.

I'm sort of torn. I'd like Gretsch necks to get chunkier but I really dislike the trend of chunky necks. Every time someone hands me their partscaster and it has some ridiculous fat neck on it I can't for the life of me figure why one would do that.

But personal preferences aside. It should be an option to get a modern Gretsch with a chunky neck.

– captainvideo

Some of the earlier Jets I've had my hands on had bigger necks, those seem to get skinnier as time progresses.

I get what you mean about the stupid chunky baseball bat telecaster necks that have been all the rage - a lot of those are just silly.

I think a lot of 50's Gibson necks are the perfect guitar necks - fairly deep, but they don't feel stupid big because there's not a lot of shoulder, it's a very soft V, or what people call a "boat" neck. a lot of reissue Les Pauls have a lot more shoulder (resulting in somewhat of a "U" shape), which makes them feel a lot bigger and clubbier. a lot of actual 50's Gibson necks can be pretty big, but in a very..umm..."elegant" way, they don't feel huge, just nice and round and chunky, and great for "thumb over" playing styles.

36

I'm sorry, man. When I glance over the list of topics and see this one's title, I just get images of Gretsh staffers at NAMM running around hugging all the women.

37

My daughter prefers her smaller Fender cd60ce to her White Falcon Rancher. I once asked her if it was because of her smaller hands. She said no and clarified that she is able to stretch her fingers due to her years of playing the piano. I honestly wonder if color had any impact. She may just prefer the tone of the black Fender, but I don’t know for sure. She could take whatever guitar she wanted to college and choose the Fender.

38

I'm sorry, man. When I glance over the list of topics and see this one's title, I just get images of Gretsh staffers at NAMM running around hugging all the women.

– Proteus

And, just exactly WHO thinks that's a bad thing, she asks?

39

Dave, I'm not talking neck width - I mean neck depth.

– WB

Oh I realize you're referring to neck thickness. I was using the SC as an exception to a thinner neck on Gretsches beyond the mid '50's as suggested. The extra width is irrelevant to the depth in my explanation.. The SC neck has [almost] vertical sides to it with a flat bottom, the exact shape in profile to a capital D.

There's obviously some different definitions being used here and it's adding confusion to the neck discussion. That SC neck defines "chunky": thick (top of fretboard to bottom side of neck) & with substantial shoulders, creating a high square inch number for the cross-section. The profile since being taken down is a shallow C and I'd be willing to bet is now only ~ 60% the total cross-section area of what it used to be. Extra width notwithstanding, my SC and my Eko acoustic dreadnought, same width neck and similar depth, would suit a smaller hand due to the physical lack of mass. While wider, they're more comfortable than my 6120 which has a relatively shallow C-profile. I'm not arguing that either one may be uncomfortable for the female anatomy, that's another point of discussion.

On the issue of male vs female anatomy, I couldn't play guitar if my body shape was that of Eddie Pennington or Richard Smith. Just sayin', some people adapt. The female anatomy, some of them anyway, are why even years ago when they were popular, you didn't see a lot of females playing accordion......changing the shape of them wasn't an option.

40

I'm sorry, man. When I glance over the list of topics and see this one's title, I just get images of Gretsh staffers at NAMM running around hugging all the women.

– Proteus
41

is that Mary Osborne Falcon a standard-sized guitar or a custom with a smaller body? if it's standard she must have been a very robust lady... Malcolm Young could probably have hidden behind his during an impromptu hide-and-go-seek session, but that guitar looks small on her.

42

is that Mary Osborne Falcon a standard-sized guitar or a custom with a smaller body? if it's standard she must have been a very robust lady... Malcolm Young could probably have hidden behind his during an impromptu hide-and-go-seek session, but that guitar looks small on her.

– macphisto

In many promo pics the guitar is shot in an angle that makes it look smaller than it is. I found this nice photo of her with a Country Club and think that‘s more realistic.

43

Do I remember a connection between Gretsch and The Gore Gore Girls or was that just the Mexican Thorazine again?

Also: gotta be careful, I’ve personally not embraced more female artists for fear of a restraining order.

44

Got that Joe? You're not embracing enough women.

45

It would be interesting to see how many of that 50% are buying electrics. Most female players I see performing are playing acoustics. Most acoustics seem to have a chunkier body and neck than a typical electric, as well as higher action and larger gauge strings. So, wouldn't the ladies currently playing acoustics find playing a typical electric to be a walk in the park by comparison?

– beatbyrd

My thoughts exactly. I usually see females strumming acoustics.

46

Gore Gore Girls, yes. I knew I was forgetting something I once knew.

47

Emanuella Hutter, of Hillbilly Moon Explosion. Next year at Viva Las Vegas.

50

If small hands and body are such an issue, then explain all those epic Japanese guitar players.

The reason men play guitar more often is because us dudes think it will make us popular and attractive to women.


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