Other Players

Eddie Van Halen Lengthy Interview and Demonstration

1

I could put this under YouTube but this probably should be under other players.

Did you see this? Very cool and informative -

2

EVH blew my mind when I first saw them open for Black Sabbath in the late 70's.

A constant tinkerer, reminds me of Les Paul in that regard.

3

He was and will always be one of the game-changers.

-I had typed a "MHO" paragraph on what he's done to VH over the years, but deleted it because "if you can't say something nice...")

4

ruger, that's okay say what's on your mind.

5

I've seen this one before. Eddie has certainly struggled with his demons. I have always been a fan, regardless. Nobody else does what he does and does it so well. JMO

6

He’s such a brilliant musician, and it’s wonderful to see him like this. The word that comes to mind is happy.

7

At 10:25 gave me a lump in my throat! Very cool interview. I bought VH1 when it came out and heard the other first few through friends, but wasn't much of a fan really. However, he is a brilliant guitar player, very musical and incredibly innovative. I think it was mostly Dave I didn't dig. Hey, I watched 40 minutes of this and loved it!

I've read some forums where younger folks dismiss him and it's absolutely ridiculous. If you lived through that time and were paying attention he was absolutely a game changer. Have read about his demons and he sure does seem to be happy here.

I knew about the variac but was cool to hear how he came to use it. Oh, but Tab was around before Eddie. True though that it would be much more practical to learn his style that way then through standard notation.

8

I'm actually learning "Panama" for my current band. Funny how, when I was 16, trying to learn this song by ear seemed impossible.... but now, it's actually not bad at all, even the solo. I haven't "tapped" since the early 90s!

9

FWIW, it was Van Halen that caused me to be able to start listening to metal. It was not only Eddie, but also his brother, Alex, that caught my attention. Not to worry, I am not a metal head, and never will be, but, I *am* a huge fan of Eddie Van Halen.

That should suffice for the shock of the day.

10

Great stuff, but does it seem like he is asking for credit for pioneering Gibson pickups in a Fender and wax potting pickups? I do believe this was done before him and by more than just a few? Ed Bickert comes to mind, and certainly the aftermarket pickup industry for example.

11

Van Halen will be remembered in history as one of those bands that changed the course of music. Before Van Halen the 1970s rock was getting stagnant and soft rock and disco were very popular. Punk and new wave were starting to rise from the underground and then Eruption and their cover of You Really Got Me caught the ear of all of my friends and me. One day we were playing kick the can and baseball with a tennis ball in the street and the next day we were in our basements learning guitars and drums. The rock and roll music scene changed overnight and 1980s rock was now defined by Van Halen, at least from our teenage boys' perception. David Lee Roth was the King MC, Eddie Van Halen was the maestro, Michael Anthony was the perfect bass player with the perfect harmonies and Alex Van Halen provided them the swing that defined their swagger. Van Halen were the spark that ignited the 1980s hard rock and metal scene.

Eddie Van Halen is the last real innovator of the electric guitar that I can think of. He belongs on the list of players that brought their unique approach to electric guitar that includes Chet Atkins, James Burton, Scotty Moore, Cliff Gallup, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and Jimi Hendrix. His rhythm playing, riff writing and song writing are just as strong as his lead playing. Also, his older brother Alex is just as strong on the drums as he is on the guitar.

12

Great stuff, but does it seem like he is asking for credit for pioneering Gibson pickups in a Fender and wax potting pickups? I do believe this was done before him and by more than just a few? Ed Bickert comes to mind, and certainly the aftermarket pickup industry for example.

– JazzBoxJunky

Well, maybe he was the first to put a Gibson PAF in the BRIDGE of a strat? IDK.

He also likes to take (and is given) credit for inventing tapping, but George Lynch and Randy Rhodes were around back then too, and they were tapping.... they just weren't famous yet.

Steve Hackett claims HE invented tapping, years before EVH.

First guitar tapping? 1965?

13

Jimmie Webster two hand tapped but in the interview I don't think EVH said he was the first. I think he implied he took it to another level.

14

LOL @ 39:40: if you make a mistake do it twice and smile 'gewoon doorfietsen'.

15

I modded(destroyed) a couple of my first guitars because of Eddie...and Les.

And I'll never forget my first VH concert either.

17

I was never even remotely into hard rock or metal or anything of that ilk - I usually don't like any of the vocal stylings in that type of music, but I do kind of like EVH : to my ears, he's a hot Rock and Roll player, fat, greasy tone, great rhythm playing, and stunt solos. He's got some old fashioned greasyness and swagger in his playing I don't hear iin the metal guys that came after him - they sound cold, technical, fast and square in comparison. IMO and YMMV and all that.

18

I was never even remotely into hard rock or metal or anything of that ilk - I usually don't like any of the vocal stylings in that type of music, but I do kind of like EVH : to my ears, he's a hot Rock and Roll player, fat, greasy tone, great rhythm playing, and stunt solos. He's got some old fashioned greasyness and swagger in his playing I don't hear iin the metal guys that came after him - they sound cold, technical, fast and square in comparison. IMO and YMMV and all that.

– WB

I was thinking the same exact thing just before I started watching the interview. His playing was raw and with depth where almost all of the '80s "speedsters" just sounded like cheese.

I also like that the of his volume didn't hide the complexity of what he was playing....both rhythm and solo.

19

Thanks for posting Polecats. It was sheer enjoyment learning about how it all happened. I will say that he did not take credit for tapping. As he really never listened to anything else, he just kind of discovered things and how to do it out of necessity. He did however note that watching Jimmy Page led to a part of it after seeing Zeppelin live.

I agree with Deed and that I liked how he looked happy. I think he was in a good place and loved how he was really interested in sharing his thoughts and telling "the" story.

And I love how he explained how the innovation comes by accident because you are trying to get the guitar to do what you want but you are not exposed to what is out there....a few come to mind here: Les Paul of course, Albert King with his multiple string bends by playing lefty, the tone of Hendrix because the lower strings had more high end with how he strung it for a lefty on a righty guitar. Even Johnny Winter when he wanted the feel of a Gibson but wanted the sound of a Fender. He didn't do it himself but got what he needed by working with Mark Erlewine and exclusively playing the Erlewine Lazer from the early '80s on when not playing slide.

20

Thank you so much for posting this. Finally I could hear the entire story from the man himself.

I would never play his records because it's not my taste but I think he is one of the best ever. His musical techniques are great but I also enjoyed the gear tech talk a lot. Just what I wanted to learn.


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