Other Players

Chuck Berry RIP

26

But for me it's true genius was as an incomparable lyricist.

I was telling my family not one week ago that the Beach Boys hit formula from Surfin' USA to Kokomo was thanks 100% to Chuck Berry's "Sweet Little 16".

We all knew it was coming but it is still devastating. It's like the soul of music is really gone.

28

It anyone got me hooked on guitar,I'd say Mr. Berry was the one.I got to thinking, has Gibson ever made a Chuck Berry tribute model? How in all that is holy is that possible? Well, unless Chuck had something to do with it.

29

Hail Hail Chuck Berry! Rest in peace and thank you for everything you have done for us.

I'm grateful that he was able to live long, unlike so many others. We have truly lost one of our great pioneers and founders.

30

Along with his obvious talent and legend, I don't understand the guitar thing either. Some may argue Strat, LP, or something else, but the 335/45/55 guitar is the iconic R&R symbol thanks to Chuck imo.

31

I only saw Chuck live once at the old Kinetic Playground back in '72 , here in Chicago. I'll never forget that night and that music. RIP Chuck. lm.

32

Very sorry to hear this. Like many here mentioned: his licks were one of the reasons I play guitar. To me his playing is everything I wanted and needed to hear. Powerful and catchy! He always was my guitar hero!
But as Spike mentioned: his lyrics were at a different level. They rose far above the 'I love my baby' level that lots of lyrics had then and now still do. Beautifully poetic and original!
I always considered Johnny B Goode the most perfect song ever written. A perfect catching intro, wonderful lyrics, a perfect catching refrain, and a great solo! What else could you want from a song! RIP Chuck!

33

RIP Sir.

Another pioneer goes home.

34

RIP Chuck.Bring a lot of Rock'n'Roll to the heavenly Band.

35

great take on one of chucks best later tunes-oh what a thrill...by berry disciple- dave edmunds (rockpile)

rip chuck berry

cheers

36

When I first heard the news about Chuck Berry's death, multiple thoughts started jockeying for position in the front of my mind. I did the best I could to get them to calm down and get organized into this blog post.

https://steveandjohnnie.wor...

37

I took my wife (then girlfriend) to see Chuck at Wolf & Riss in the Valley in '79. About half way thru the show he must have pissed off his rhythm section as they up and walked off stage. I was about to jump up and sit in on drums when a little kid beat me to it. Finished off the set with two kids from the crowd. What a fun show.

Gonna miss you Chuck.

38

A couple of comments from pros:

Dan Baird (lifetime Berry devotee)
The Brown Eyed Handsome Man is gone. The USA doesn't knight anyone. They should have made an exception for you. Thank you for the language I speak. The humor, the insight, the movement, your amalgamation of all the styles that came before you into something simultaneously new and familiar. May your heart and soul know peace. Godspeed

Charlie Starr (Blackberry Smoke)
To me, Chuck Berry has always been the King of rock and roll. He created the riffs that we guitar players use daily, perfected the slick poetry that we lyricists try so hard to write and put it all across with a rebellious, devil-may-care grin on his face... Without Mr. Chuck Berry there would be no rock and roll. Period.

39

My fondest memory of Chuck Berry is when I saw him live in 2002 at the Universal Amphitheater. Little Richard opened the show. He was a living legend and glad I had the opportunity and privilege to see him live. This was sponsored, well at least promoted by K-Earth 101 and the MC was legendary K-Earth personality and DJ Shotgun Tom Kelly. What a great show.

The LA Times has a story about him of course and has a photo of him performing in 1980 at the Hollywood Palladium. Man that would have been a great show to attend. I wonder if the show was packed with LA punk scene kids. The Palladium right there on Sunset Blvd. right at the height of the LA punk scene. From the photo I see no punks but that was just the front few rows. Who knows who was in the rows farther back.

I bet Billy Zoom might have some Chuck Berry stories. Love to hear some.

What's your fave Berry song, guys? Mine is "Maybellene".

40

I took my wife (then girlfriend) to see Chuck at Wolf & Riss in the Valley in '79. About half way thru the show he must have pissed off his rhythm section as they up and walked off stage. I was about to jump up and sit in on drums when a little kid beat me to it. Finished off the set with two kids from the crowd. What a fun show.

Gonna miss you Chuck.

– Powdog

That's very punk. I tell you, Chuck Berry was the original punk rocker. Him and Jerry Lee.

41

My fondest memory of Chuck Berry is when I saw him live in 2002 at the Universal Amphitheater. Little Richard opened the show. He was a living legend and glad I had the opportunity and privilege to see him live. This was sponsored, well at least promoted by K-Earth 101 and the MC was legendary K-Earth personality and DJ Shotgun Tom Kelly. What a great show.

The LA Times has a story about him of course and has a photo of him performing in 1980 at the Hollywood Palladium. Man that would have been a great show to attend. I wonder if the show was packed with LA punk scene kids. The Palladium right there on Sunset Blvd. right at the height of the LA punk scene. From the photo I see no punks but that was just the front few rows. Who knows who was in the rows farther back.

I bet Billy Zoom might have some Chuck Berry stories. Love to hear some.

What's your fave Berry song, guys? Mine is "Maybellene".

– ThePolecats

My favorite Chuck Berry song? Roll Over, Beethoven. Can't believe he's gone. Can't say I never saw it coming, either. 'Bye, Chuck. Thanks for the riffs, and the lyrics.

42

Does anyone know when he played his last gig? Doubt that it was too long ago.

43

Thanks Chuck, for all the time you've given to music and rock n' roll. I was set to buy a 335 in my early learning days as a guitarist until a certain cat steered me to Gretsch.

We played Johnny B. Goode last Saturday—the kids, teens, oldies and in between we're on the floor dancing. That attest a lot how timeless the song is—I bet the kids there don't know but it moved them.

44

Does anyone know when he played his last gig? Doubt that it was too long ago.

– Don Birchett

It's probably bad form to answer your own question but according to one site it was October 20, 2016 at The Rafael Espinoza Music Academy, Mineola, Texas. That would be two days after his ninetieth birthday!

45

The USA and the world Have lost an Icon! Rest well sir.

46

I got to play Johnny B. Goode on Saturday night with a good band. I'm really happy I was able to do that on the day he passed away. Chuck Berry's music is timeless. I didn't have to introduce my kids to him, they found him on their own from my DVDs and CDs just like I did with my parent's records.

47

I did this little tribute to Chuck a little over a year ago. His ability to write and perform those songs in his early days with such energy and style and combined with his unusual personality, superb intellect, and deep seated distrust for people just made him so interesting to me.

– Jim Austin

This is a great performance video! Well done Jim!

48

A tribute by The Sex Pistols. Appropriate because of the Chuck Berry influence on Steve Jones (think double stops) and the punk scene in that day going back to the raw rock music of the 50s as well as fashion influences.

Warning "f bomb" in this song.

49

In a book I recently read, I believe it was "The Chitlin' Circuit: and the Road to Rock n Roll" by Preston Lauterbach, it mentioned both Chuck Berry and BB King, before developing into the styles the world knows them for, were both doing their own "version" of T-Bone Walker.... a jazzy/bluesy thing. And BOY can you hear it in BB's early cuts! Sometimes an early BB song will come on Sirius, and I'll think it's T-Bone, until he starts singing.

But I've never heard anything out of Chuck that resembles T-Bone... I guess he wasn't recording at that point in his career? His career took off when he "invented" what we now know as "the 3-minute rock-n-roll song"....lol

50

Here's a great write-up in Premier Guitar that mirrors many things said here in this thread...

https://www.premierguitar.c...

If all Chuck Berry had done was write the brilliant, guitar-driven, 3-minute operettas that stoked the flames of early rock ’n’ roll—“Maybellene,” “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Too Much Monkey Business,” “You Can’t Catch Me,” “School Day (Ring Ring Goes the Bell),” “Rock and Roll Music,” “Sweet Little Sixteen,” and “Johnny B. Goode”—between the summer of 1955 and spring ’58, his place in history would be assured. But Berry did much more. His writing was clever and articulate, and fractured the Tin Pan Alley-version of songwriting, in which Svengalis of the pen and piano manufactured songs for artists.


Register Sign in to join the conversation