Pickups

using a vintage neck Dyna in the bridge position

1

I have some vintage Dynasonics in a guitar and was thinking of using the neck pickup from that guitar and putting it in a different guitar in the bridge position. Other than extra shimming up to get it closer to the strings are there any reasons I can't use it in the bridge position. The pole piece spacing looks to be the same and the meter readings show them to be pretty close in output.

2

I'm not sure how "vintage" your Dynasonic pickups are but if you're taking original De Armond models then they're all the same. Nobody thought about specialized models for different positions back then.

For later models, I'm not so sure but the Korean Dynasonics in my Terada 2005 Gretsch 6120 Nashville seem to be identical.

3

They're the same. The post-Gretsch DeArmonds came with different sized casings, 7/16" neck and 9/16" bridge. I assume the bridge units had more resistance but that's about it; you really can't hear any difference.

4

I'm not sure how "vintage" your Dynasonic pickups are but if you're taking original De Armond models then they're all the same. Nobody thought about specialized models for different positions back then.

For later models, I'm not so sure but the Korean Dynasonics in my Terada 2005 Gretsch 6120 Nashville seem to be identical.

– Yavapai

Its hard to date them but I believe they are 60s/70s. They're chrome and are two different heights but clearly old. That was my thinking also...that they didn't make them specifically for each position so it should work in theory.

5

They're the same. The post-Gretsch DeArmonds came with different sized casings, 7/16" neck and 9/16" bridge. I assume the bridge units had more resistance but that's about it; you really can't hear any difference.

– lx

Yeah these are definately post Gretsch ones. I think they may have lost a little pep along the way since I noticed that neck actually has a little more resistance at 9.7 than the bridge at 9.4.

6

My guess is that those are pretty early ones. In the Gretsch era, the impedance was usually around 9k - 9.5k. They got hotter over time, but I don't know exactly when that started or what the curve, so to speak, of the increase was. And I don't think that pickup makers were intentionally making bridge pickups hotter back then, just winding them all to about the same spec and stuffing them in the casings.

And about the casing, all I know is that Gretsch didn't use different heights for the bridge and neck pickups. I don't know that DeArmond didn't make them at all, so the different heights, to me, only says they didn't come from a Gretsch.

One of the things that can positively ID an early DeArmond is the tiny little wire that comes out of the coil. Early ones had white cloth insulation. Later ones had plastic, usually red, green or white.

7

My guess is that those are pretty early ones. In the Gretsch era, the impedance was usually around 9k - 9.5k. They got hotter over time, but I don't know exactly when that started or what the curve, so to speak, of the increase was. And I don't think that pickup makers were intentionally making bridge pickups hotter back then, just winding them all to about the same spec and stuffing them in the casings.

And about the casing, all I know is that Gretsch didn't use different heights for the bridge and neck pickups. I don't know that DeArmond didn't make them at all, so the different heights, to me, only says they didn't come from a Gretsch.

One of the things that can positively ID an early DeArmond is the tiny little wire that comes out of the coil. Early ones had white cloth insulation. Later ones had plastic, usually red, green or white.

– Afire

Ah yes....I remember hearing about the different wire types. The tiny wire is white plastic on these pickups.

8

musicpickups.com is the best source for all information about DeArmond pickups. I always discover something new there.

9

Being no expert at all but it doesnt matter when it comes to single use of one pickup.It matters when you want to use two pickups at the same time for a humcancelling effect - then one pickup has to be reverse wound to the other

10

Original DeArmond pups were not reverse wound

11

There just wasn't the tweaky specialized pickup scene back then and the earliest aftermarket pickups of any sort I remember were DiMarzio buckers and Tele/Strat pickups from 1974.

12

Yeah these are definately post Gretsch ones. I think they may have lost a little pep along the way since I noticed that neck actually has a little more resistance at 9.7 than the bridge at 9.4.

– tabletop

a magnet will lose a little magnetism over time, but the DC resistance you're reading is the coil, and that doesn't change.

13

a magnet will lose a little magnetism over time, but the DC resistance you're reading is the coil, and that doesn't change.

– WB

Ah...good to know. Cheers


Register Sign in to join the conversation