Pickups

T-Armond Pickup Orientation

1

I've tried to contact TV Jones to learn the recommended orientation for a set of T-Armonds with no luck; want to understand whether slugs are in or out for bridge and neck positions.

Thanks in advance.

2

they are not really slugs..they are actual magnets..thats what makes them so great!! adjustable magnet polepieces!!

neck pup mags toward headstock

bridge pup mags toward bridge

adj screws on inside facing each other

cheers

3

Unless you want a mellower bridge tone and a hollower neck tone, in which case you turn them around.

4

per the documentation that comes with the pickups:

"we recommend install the T-Armonds as shown below, with BOTH neck and bridge magnets facing north (facing the neck) note: For brighter bridge tone, turn bridge pickup 180 degrees "

So there you go. I tried it his way and didn't like it. I didn't at all care for the thicker, meatier bridge tone - turned it 180 and prefered the thinner, yet very twangy sound. But I don't play with overdrive much and I like it sparkly clean. I say try it both ways.

5

Unless you want a mellower bridge tone and a hollower neck tone, in which case you turn them around.

– Proteus

haha...nice!

or no tone in which case you remove them altogether!!

there are recommended or time proven ways, & there are alt.ways...but ultimately trust your ears!!..fortunately you can switch with no problems!

cheers

6

In looking at photos of both new and used Gretsches with T’Armonds or Dynas, it appears that the majority have the poles to the outside and the adjustment screws closest to each other.

7

"Unless you want a mellower bridge tone and a hollower neck tone, in which case you turn them around."

Absolutely correct. I've tried it and it works well!

8

Thanks for all the helpful replies.

9

I've tried to contact TV Jones to learn the recommended orientation for a set of T-Armonds with no luck; want to understand whether slugs are in or out for bridge and neck positions.

Thanks in advance.

– Caliban335

hola! :)

Here's a full thread about it on this forum: http://gretschpages.com/for...

hi-lites below

also position affects the response. I found that flipping the neck pickup w the slugs away from the fretboard, reduced the HUGE low end on the big 17" setzer phoenix even though physically the movement is slight. take a look.

I decided to make a little two picture example of this T-Series T-armond to show flipping that pickup moves the magnetic slugs more than you realize. Observe white grease pencil markings.. kind of wide markings but you can see that there is a measured distance. I got 9/32" spacial distance from the magnet center point marked between the grease pencil marks.. not uber technical but even with a grease pencil and ruler this measurement is just over a quarter in forward/reverse movement. This actually decreases the boominess of the pickup in a hollowbody with a 2.75 depth. Harmonics change too, here's what Tvjones had to say on this (after one cat on another forum brought up the neck pkup mags under the 24th " fret harmonic": " I have had customers over the years say they want more output, or a thicker tone out of their bridge pickups. They say "it's too bright, too thin." The first thing I ask is "how close is your pickup to your bridge?" Usually too close to the bridge. The bad news is, there's not too much you can do if you're after more power, or a thicker natural tone. There is less string energy closer to the bridge. Same applies to the neck position. Too close to the end of the fingerboard, generally too full and boomy – more string energy. Neck pickups are compensated with less power and adjusted lower for this reason. Basses and neck position pickups: I prefer the neck pickup on a bass not to be mounted at the end of the fingerboard. Too boomy, too much string energy. Look where the pickups on a Fender bass are located. • The magic to great tone is to do everything LITTLE thing you can do to get where you want to be. All of the crazy little things add up to a huge difference. I am nuts about this. It really works. • Not discussed: Fundamental string harmonics, and 1st harmonic, 2nd harmonic, 3rd, 4th... Placement of the pickup (in this case a single coil - more detailed string sensing). • Also not discussed: Nodal points (wave nodes, the point along a standing wave). Put a single coil under the 2nd octave and try to play harmonics at frets other than the 12th (single coil pickups sense the string at one point). Whenever I do fret work, build a guitar, design pickup, I add up all the little things that end of making a world of difference. -TV Jones "

http://www.thenocturnebrain...


Register Sign in to join the conversation