Pickups

Lowering Dynas, not raising ‘em

1

Everyone always seems to recommend raising Dynasonics in order to increase the lower frequencies. I dutifully added a second spacer under my Country Club's bridge pickup and was quite pleased with the results for home playing. However, when I played a show last week, low-end feedback was a pretty serious problem when playing through a '64 Deluxe Reverb placed on the floor and angled up towards me. I took out the second bridge pickup spacer and replaced the factory neck spacer with a thin foam one (TV Jones, IIRC). The guitar still has a lovely, rich bass response, but the feedback appears to have been tamed. It's a 2010 grey and purple model and has a 3-ply top that's supposed to be all maple, but I can see pronounced but unphotographable straight grain lines through the paint on the top, so I'm wondering whether the top layer might be spruce. Anyway, it's super-lively and lowering the pickups was the right move in this case. Just thought I'd share.

2

I had the yellow version.

The top is spruce, and has a thin layer of maple underneath. It's not 3-ply maple.

3

Mine has T-Armonds in it, as all my dyna-guitars have.Never had an issue, even at high volume.

4

I had the yellow version.

The top is spruce, and has a thin layer of maple underneath. It's not 3-ply maple.

– Steve Yetter

"Had?"

Did you get rid of that bad boy, yettoblaster? What gives?

5

"Had?"

Did you get rid of that bad boy, yettoblaster? What gives?

– Ric12string

Yeah it's gone quite a while ago.

Turns out I actually prefer the 16" 6120 size when it comes to DeArmonds. The CC was close, but 17" guitars are pretty big. They sorta stick out in the back right where I sorta stick out in the front.

6

To Ric12string: I have a 2012 CC, yellow & copper; TArmand in the neck & TV Jones Magnatron in the bridge.

7

My jet firebird can squeak if I get to close to the amp. Tarmonds too. Absolutely hates a fuzz pedal which is a shame. I do have T armonds in another guitar so I'll go compare

8

This one definitely has a three-ply top. The inner layer is maple. There was already less feedback than the green spruce-top model that it replaced, but it was a problem until I turned the bass down to 4. I normally have it on 8! The amp has a Vintage 30 in it, and the reverb was all the way up, with a cap change in the reverb circuit that increases the reverb by about 30 percent. So there's that...

9

I had some delay on it as well, and I was using the neck pickup. Every factor that could increase the likelihood of feedback, other than distortion, was in place.

10

And I have no belly fat to mute the guitar's vibration. I don't even rest my forearm on the top much.

11

The simple solution would be not to angle the amp up towards you.

13

I love reverb. The gig was with just electronic drums and female vocals, kind of a doom-laden dream pop thing. Iplay a lot of surf, too. The more reverb the better!

14

To Ric12string: I have a 2012 CC, yellow & copper; TArmand in the neck & TV Jones Magnatron in the bridge.

– jaxsun

Nice jaxsun. Great guitar and for the tone I'm chasing, your choice of pickups is killer....very cool!

15

getting the amp off the floor can help

16

Ger is absolutely correct. I don't understand the physics, but the combination of a hollowbody and tiltback legs is the express elevator to the penthouse of howl.

17

Worse than that - the amp was leaning back against the wall. And the music has lots of sustained chords that give feedback time to develop.

18

I've used a super reverb on tilt back legs witha hollowbody guitar for the past 20 years of shows and I have to stick my guitar up against the amp to get feedback. I think the tiltback legs are the only sensible way not to cut off the audiences head with the excessive treble required when the amps is pointed at your knees!


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