Pickups

Gretsch Single-Coil Pickup Impedance Registry

26
lionel-mine is a 2005, and yes, the bridge pickup does measure that high. I bought the guitar planning to have them rewound so I was very pleased
27
2005 G6128-1957 DuoJet: Bridge 7,65 Neck 7,57.
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Vintage (NOS) dynas (learly 60s)...

Neck: 13k Bridge: 13k

29
'56 Dyna at the bridge on my Rally. 2 new Japanese Dynas still due to go into the New Jet
30
A 2003 Gretsch 6120 DSV Nashville: Neck: 7.9 kOhm Bridge: 7.8 kOhm I wonder how much the guitar lead used will affect the reading. I didn't have short patch cable at hand so I used a Viper cable of 3 m long. Edit: with a short patch cable I got readings 8.1 kOhm and 8.0 kOhm... just pointing out the cable seems to contribute quite a lot.
31
G5129, Dearmond 2000 both pickups = 8.7 kOhm
32
G6130KP Roundup prototype (yup, THAT one.) S/N mfg date, July 2007, stock Gretsch Dynasonics Neck: 7.88 kOhms Bridge: 8.07 kOhms Measured from the output jack with all pots wide open.
33
2006 G6196; Neck 7.6, Bridge 7.99 And just because I still can't believe this; 2008 Maton BB1200 fitted with Maton's humbuckers Neck 20.91 Bridge 21.79 Coil Split Neck 10.7 Bridge 11.11
34
04 DSW both neck and bridge 8.3 pair of deArmonds direct from the pickup 8.8 neck and 8.9 bridge
35
Hey Prote Is there enough to draw any conclusion from all this.
36
No real conclusion, but some observations and recollections of more historically informed opinions than mine. 1 - virtually all modern factory Dynas range in the 7 - 8 neighborhood. 2 - Seymour Duncan values are irrelevant, because one can order whatever one wants. 3 - We have waaay too few vintage specs here to even venture speculation (based on this evidence). But - as came out of the extensive Truth About Dynasonics thread of last February, modern Dynas' values were based on SOMEthing. It's likely that Duke Kramer was advising Fred G on tech matters when Dynas reappeared in the 90s, and I'm thinking he MUST have had examples of vintage pickups which were used as models to develop the new ones. I have to think they were of low-ish readings comparable to the range of the new ones. At the same time, there seemed general agreement (and the unequivocal word of FMIC staff who regularly handle vintage instruments in developing reissues) that vintage DeArmonds varied across a range. Those folks say it's going too far to assert that modern factory reissue Dynas are - though they don't specifically say either "we measured dozens or hundreds and averaged them" or "we could make the modern ones perfectly consistent if we wanted to, but we intentionally let them vary bafflingly through the 7s and 8s because such inconsistency is vintage-correct." 3 - It's been suggested (in other threads) that the very highest readings attributed to vintage Dynas came from late 50s and early 60s pickups, which weren't originally installed in Gretsch guitars. (Gretsch phased out DeArmonds while phasing in Filtertrons through '58 and into '59.) In that scenario, Rowe Industries kept selling the "Dynasonic" to other builders (and in the aftermarket) into the 60s, either winding them progressively hotter to compete with dual-coil pickups, or simply abandoning specs. Some of those pickups were then later installed in Gretschs. Nothing here contradicts that theory - the few 50s measurements we have are hottest very near the end of Gretsch Dynasonic use in 1957, and are still barely in the 10s. (11 - 13 is claimed for the hottest Dynas of the past.) TV Jones maintains that the perfect value is around 9 - 9.5, taken from his measurements of a particular Jet belonging to Brian Setzer, which strikes all who hear it as particularly sonorous. I think I recall Billy Z saying that we put way too much time and energy into considering these matters, as he doesn't find much difference in sound between the lighter and the heavier vintage examples he's heard across many guitars. I don't recall (if I ever knew) what value the Seymours in his tribute model are wound to. _____ Personally, I find that the factory spec, in the 7s and 8s, is beautiful in deep hollowbodies. But it leaves me digging for more on Jets and thin hollows, where I want a little more meat. Not necessarily in the 12 - 13 range, but something in the 9 - 10 area.
37
Proteus said: At the same time, there seemed general agreement (and the unequivocal word of FMIC staff who regularly handle vintage instruments in developing reissues) that vintage DeArmonds varied across a range. Those folks say it's going too far to assert that modern factory reissue Dynas are - though they don't specifically say either "we measured dozens or hundreds and averaged them" or "we could make the modern ones perfectly consistent if we wanted to, but we intentionally let them vary bafflingly through the 7s and 8s because such inconsistency is vintage-correct."
I pointed out earlier that I get different readings with different cables (0.2 kOhm difference, reading being "around 8.0 kOhm)". When all the readings here on modern dynas seem to be around 7 point something and 8 point something I think they're very consistent and differences are merely due to measurements, dirty pots, different patch cables and different multimeters.
38
Ambient temp has a fair bit to do with it as well.
39
I have a pair of vintage Dynas- They read 9.40 and 10.50 - Hope this is of some use-
40
Seymour Duncan Dyanasonics (2008 G6128TDS) Neck 11.4 K Bridge 11.8 K MFG Date 11/18/09
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Baldwin Supertron II: 4.4 K (2.2K per coil)
42
gc, the Supertron should go in the Filtertron Impedance Registry, no? This thread is about single-coils... Your HiLos belong here, however.
43

Vintage dynas ('54 Country Club)

Neck 9.3k

Bridge 9.6k

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Every Gretsch-era DeArmond I've measured, maybe around 10 of them, has metered from around 9k to 9.5k. I don't doubt that others fall outside that range, but I agree with Proteus's guess that a lot of the really high readings are probably attributable to later post-Gretsch DeArmonds that seem to have gotten quite a bit hotter by the 60's. They were still making them in the 70's, and I think even the early 80's. There was a pair of NOS Dynasonics, complete with harness and original packaging and papers, for sale on eBay a few years ago. It had an invoice, the date of which really surprised me. I want to say 1978 or 1982. I wish I would have written it down. Anyway, it was way later than I would have expected.

45

Okay, here's an interesting one: 1949 DeArmond on eBay. Given the clear bobbin, that's without a doubt a genuine early DeArmond. I've measured 3 of these early clear ones, and each one read about 9.5k. I measured them directly at the leads. This seller is measuring through the harness and a jack. Might that be accounting for the high reading? Might measuring methods have something to do with the occasional reports of some pretty high numbers?

46

1992 Dynasonic bought Directly from Duke Kramer (RIP)

Both 8.2K

47

Hilos run 3.2 to around 4.0. TV Jones wraps his bridge Hilo to 4.1....I believe 4.2 might be the limit...at least that's the best Lindy Fralin could achieve when he rewound one for me and I told him to wrap as much wire on the spool as he could.

48

Seymour Duncan Dynas in the 6128TDS-R (USA Custom Shop Jet):

Neck: 11.01k

Bridge: 10.98k

49

2005 G6119-1962HT (HiLotrons)

Bridge: just over 3k

Middle: just under 1.4k

Neck: just under 2.8k

Sorry my numbers aren't super precise. I'm using an old analog multi-meter.

50

1993 Pre-FMIC Dynas (6128T-1957) Neck: 7.94K Bridge: 7.88K

Is that odd? Bridge p'ups always seem to have higher values than the neck.

Edit: In looking closer at the other posts, I guess it's not THAT odd.


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