Pickups

Eddie Cochran’s P-90, how many winds, what gauge wire & what magnet…

1

Who has the snopes proof deets on Eddie Cochran's P-90? Can you tell me how many winds, what gauge wire & what magnets did it have?

2

Dunno if any of that would make a difference. I had a '61 ES-125TC with a very lively P-90, which will always be "one that got away." Many years later I had a '61 ES-125t 3/4 with a very meh P-90. I too would love to hear what made the first one such a winner. There is a difference.

3

How would anyone know? Where is it now, and would the owner let you take it apart? You'd have to destroy it to count the winds. You might be able to find the length of the wire by testing it's DC resistance, then estimate the number of winds, tho it'd likely not be accurate. Was it loose wound or tight? Magnet type and wire gauge could be easily sorted out.

4

sure its just the classic gibby wind

10000 winds of #42 wire...screw pole pieces...alnico v bar magnets...

thin (depth) but wide bobbin

back then, winders didnt have multimeters to check resistance .... factory winders did it by sight..they knew when the bobbin looked right

variables yes, but the basics are there

stay safe t

cheers

5

Did he record anything on that pickup? Just curious as most recordings seem to be the dyna bridge

6

sure its just the classic gibby wind

10000 winds of #42 wire...screw pole pieces...alnico v bar magnets...

thin (depth) but wide bobbin

back then, winders didnt have multimeters to check resistance .... factory winders did it by sight..they knew when the bobbin looked right

variables yes, but the basics are there

stay safe t

cheers

– neatone

Weren't the very early P90s AlNiCo III until about 1957 or so and therefore weaker?

7

There's EC material that sounds like the neck pickup alone. He switches back and forth on Eddie's Blues, for example. Not sure, but Am I Blue and Dark Lonely Street seem to be neck pickup as well. I have about seven hours of his stuff, but I'm not gonna go through it just now.

8

Actually, I think Eddie bought one of those Chinese P-90 clones from GuitarFetish.com because it was so cheap, but is just as good as "the real thing."

9

Actually, I think Eddie bought one of those Chinese P-90 clones from GuitarFetish.com because it was so cheap, but is just as good as "the real thing."

– Tartan Phantom

He was a time traveler who could buy from GFS.

Question though, anyone know the details on who installed it for him? Did he actually know how to do electronic work or if he didn't, who installed it? Did he get it done at the guitar shop he purchased the guitar at or did he bring it somewhere else?Electric guitar was still a new thing then so there probably were not tons of guitar techs around back then like there is now.

10

Question though, anyone know the details on who installed it for him? Did he actually know how to do electronic work or if he didn't, who installed it? Did he get it done at the guitar shop he purchased the guitar at or did he bring it somewhere else?Electric guitar was still a new thing then so there probably were not tons of guitar techs around back then like there is now.

I don't know the answer specifically for Eddie - but the electric guitar was very simply electrically by comparison to nearly any other electrical appliance. And boys then, like their fathers, were just as likely to be curious about the innards of gadgets as we are today - and even more so, because the gadgets were easier to acces, understand, and repair (and their parts were all at macro scale).

Soldering was a skill lots of young'uns with any sort of gadget interest were likely to have - or in any case, it wouldn't have intimidated many. I wouldn't be surprised if Eddie hadn't fished the guts out, seen the relevant solder points, and done the work himself.

11

Also, Señor Vega, if anyone has the snopes-proof deets, it would be the Gretsch custom shop, who built the tributes a few years ago. Have you tried them fellers?

12

Also, Señor Vega, if anyone has the snopes-proof deets, it would be the Gretsch custom shop, who built the tributes a few years ago. Have you tried them fellers?

– Proteus

Tim, do you know if the P90 in the Gretsch EC Custom Shop is a SD specially made for this guitar or if Gretsch made it themselves or another maker?

I take it the CS EC has a different P90 than the standard production EC model.

Darrel Higham may know the specs Tavo is interested in because he purchased one from the Gretsch Custom Shop that Jeff Beck was considering buying but didn't. Darrel may know the windings and magnet info since he bought one. Maybe even Jeff Beck knew and relayed that info to Darrel. If a PM can be sent to Darrel he may help.

13

Tim, do you know if the P90 in the Gretsch EC Custom Shop is a SD specially made for this guitar or if Gretsch made it themselves or another maker?

I don't know that.

14

The CS version has a Seymour Duncan, presumably from the SD Custom Shop and ordered to match the specs of the original. The pre-endorsement 1957W has a 5% underwound Lindy Fralin P90.

15

Darrel should know better than anyone whether the repro is accurate. He actually played Eddie's guitar! IIRC, though, it wasn't plugged in.

17

Like this:

– Billy Zoom

Billy, I know you are a big proponent of Kent Armstrong P90s but what makes them better in your opinion over Gibson brand P90s? Thanks.

18

I can tell you the exact resistance of a 1955 P-90.

But only after you admit that you wouldn’t know Anti-Freeze Green from Petunia Pink.

19

I can tell you the exact resistance of a 1955 P-90.

But only after you admit that you wouldn’t know Anti-Freeze Green from Petunia Pink.

– JBGretschGuy

Okay I don't know Anti-Freeze Green from Petunia Pink.

20

Billy, I know you are a big proponent of Kent Armstrong P90s but what makes them better in your opinion over Gibson brand P90s? Thanks.

– ThePolecats

I have modern Gibson P90s in a 2011 Epiphone Casino and I have Kent Armstrong P90s in another guitar. I can say the Kent Armstrong P90s have more clarity and a more balanced P90 tone compared to the Gibson P90 which have a good tone of their own but with more P90 growl and punch in the mids if that makes any sense.

I know I'm not Billy.

21

Okay I don't know Anti-Freeze Green from Petunia Pink.

– ThePolecats

My post was directed at the OP, not to be confused with the OG.

22

Billy, I know you are a big proponent of Kent Armstrong P90s but what makes them better in your opinion over Gibson brand P90s? Thanks.

– ThePolecats

They sound just like vintage P90's. Modern Gibson P90's don't!

23

Weren't the very early P90s AlNiCo III until about 1957 or so and therefore weaker?

– sascha

The resistance on old P90's varies , and they go from low 7K all the way up to 9K, and in a P90, that produces a very audible difference - to my ears, more of a difference than magnets in how hard they hit your amp.
A friend told me his one-owner, untouched early 50's ES350 had a 9K P90 in the neck, and a 7-something in the bridge slot, making it very unbalanced. he did eventually switch them around.

24

I can tell you the exact resistance of a 1955 P-90.

But only after you admit that you wouldn’t know Anti-Freeze Green from Petunia Pink.

– JBGretschGuy

oh man... this is tough. I dont know dick about vintage p90's other than what I hear from the one on my my 56' gib ES150 which has both a fat low end and super clean jangle on top. A pickup that sounds nothing like the horrible modern long hair blues sounds of the 70s and on. I was hoping to get some basics about it (and thanks to everyone for their contributions thus far).

ps. I can only admit that I am too mean to my friends on occasion when I've been drinking 19crimes red table wine and posting on FBThank you for still being my pal haha.

25

ps. that freakin meme is wrong, and TGP wont let me correct it. It was supposed to be this one


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