Pickups

Dearmond 2000 repair

1

Hope you guys can help here Bought a "defective" Dearmond 2000 Bridge pickup. Just simply tested it with guitar cable and amp holding the wires to the cable's ground and tip tapping with a screwdriver on the polepieces. No sound its coming out - only if I hold the bare and brown wire to the tip of the cable and the black wire to the cable's ground. But only from the D's and E's polepieces I'll hear the tapping noise. All other conection possibilities will only give a very low output noise when tapping the pole pieces. Is it shot or what I am doing wrong? Thanks

4

Update... All of the polepieces make sound - now and then -except the Low E when I'm holding the bare wire only against the tip of the cable???

5

I would try raising and lowering the poles a couple times in case there is some crud or oxidation screwing things up. No idea if it makes sense from a physics standpoint ( electromagnetics is foreign to me).

6

I would try raising and lowering the poles a couple times in case there is some crud or oxidation screwing things up. No idea if it makes sense from a physics standpoint ( electromagnetics is foreign to me).

– NJBob

I already tried that and it kinda works for a second or two... Weird.

7

All polepieces make sound now but only in a certain position height-wise. So I believe something (magnets) is not making contact properly due ??? Can I soak it in anti corrosion stuff?

8

Try testing it right from the points the brown and black wire are soldered to. Ignore the lead. The 'bare' wire is just a shield , make sure it is NOT touching the others before you test them. The crucial wires for testing the pickups function are the black and brown . but bypass them and test at the poles they are attached to. The pickup's lead is easy to replace if need be. Also make sure that no 'bare' part of the black and brown wires are touching each other or the pickup's base or casing. You really need to test it's Dc resistance with an ohm meter.

9

Thanks for your input. I'll catch my friend checking the black and brown wires with his Ohm meter

10

Did you resolve the problem? Strings disturb the magnets' fields, creating a signal in the coil. So if one magnetic pole works they all should. Not sure if tapping with a screwdriver is the best technique.

11

Hi No.. The Ohm meter testing had read that theres zero output

Now its officially busted But I found the mistake and there were several breaks in the coil wire in the hot end. I tried the new "starting point" of the wire and soldered it back on. No success. I assume there were more breaks in the wire. I removed all of the stuff.

Anyone here that can do a rewind?

And anybody knows which wire gauge to use and how many turns? Thank you very much

12

It's not that difficult if you are patient and careful. You can make a winder out of a battery powered drill and or a sewing machine motor..or even an old sewing machine. You can also make a counter using an old mouse with the left click button wired up to a couple of contacts which close every time your winder goes round once. Open up you computer's calculator, type in 1 + and then put your cursor on =. Voila! A turns counter. I have used both these methods to rewind 2 vintage hilotrons as well as winding a filtertron from a kit. You can even fix breaks mid wind if you run into problems. You can buy spools of 42 or 43 gauge enamel coated wire from various sites and or ebay, All the information you want is on the net. Go for it. At this point you can't wreck the pickup

13

Thanks for your input! I was already watching some videos how to do it. A turntable also comes handy with rewinding I think I'll give it a shot. How many turns with 42/43 gauge wire? 8000? 10.000? And sorry for my lack of knowledge but do I have to solder the start point of the coil wire before start winding? Cheers

14

If you don't have any luck trying it yourself, send me some pics of the bare bobbin and I'll see if I think I can mount it on the faceplate of my pickup winder. I have 42, 43, and 44 gauge wire on hand.


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