Pickups

Cleaning vintage gold Supers & Filters

1

Hi there again,

I've got a set of 1965 gold (with the green rust) Supertrons arriving in about 3 months, and in the meantime have a set of dark sounding 1969 gold (also with green rust) Filtertrons that I've mentioned in a previous post about bringing them back to life etc.

However, this post is about cleaning the green rust of the little buggers. Does anybody make anything specifically for this, or is there a Frankenstein concoction to do the trick?

Any/all help appreciated.

Thanks

2

You can remove that with vinegar but it'll remove the gold where the oxidation attached itself.

remove the covers and soak them for a while.

3

That's verdigris, not green rust. It's a natural result of copper and brass oxidizing. It's what gives all copper based metals their patina. Brasso would remove it, but like Curt said, it'll remove the gold plating as well .
Damned if you do; damned if you don't. Good luck.

4

Thanks everyone, looks like the color is staying.

5

That's verdigris, not green rust. It's a natural result of copper and brass oxidizing. It's what gives all copper based metals their patina. Brasso would remove it, but like Curt said, it'll remove the gold plating as well .
Damned if you do; damned if you don't. Good luck.

– wabash slim

I wonder if a new TVJ or SD cover would fit the space of a vintage pickup? Like keep the guts original, but a new cover.

If Brian Setzer was using TVJ pickups in his 6120s before, the closeup shots looked vintage. Kind of makes me go hmmmmm.

6

Watching a video on home plating, the host recommended waxing gold plated items to keep the gold from rubbing off. I wish I had thought of that before.

7

Watching a video on home plating, the host recommended waxing gold plated items to keep the gold from rubbing off. I wish I had thought of that before.

– Mr. Astro Jet

Thanks!

8

Ther is deoxit for gold plated contacts, which does a more finessed job of removing verdigris than vinegar, the 'green stuff' is zinc oxide and copper sulphate.

Brass sufferes from a condition called dezincification, which is the result of the zinc content oxidising out of the parent alloy, which leaves an unstable cupro-zinc alloy which then results in oxidation of the Cu, usually to moisture born particles containing sulphur compounds or broken down organic matter. (skin sweat and other detrirus).

A lot of it depends on the percentage of zinc in the alloy, and notwithstanding that, how well the plating process was monitored. Brass is usually plated with Nickel, then gold, but not always. Depends who is doing the plating.

it's not all bad. patina on old gold-plated parts on guitars is part of the joy (or frustration) of owning one. My Deusenberg TV Phonic developed same, despite being made in 2018 and having been polished with beeswax on the gold parts.

Tuning machine keys were first to suffer. Can't win em all.

Deoxit does work though. the gold one comes in a nail varnish sized bottle.

9

I've never used it for this purpose, but Renaissance Wax, developed for The British Museum, would probably be a good choice.

10

Vinegar...

it’s cheap, you have a couple varieties in your kitchen, it works, it’s what every guitar restorer uses, it’s cheap, dioxide takes 10X’s as long and vinegar works 100% of the time and in case you didn’t know it’s really cheap. And no everything can’t be about cheapness except when it comes to green funk, green funk requires cheapness to prevail because it’s fugly as a cheap date.


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