Pickups

age of these Dearmonds ?

1

Hi there, does any one know what era these Dearmond pickups might be from?

3

Have to see the tops to be sure, but I suspect that they are post-Gretsch Guild era; If they are different heights then this is what they are.

4

Here they are in the guitar...yeah they are different heights. So what sort of year are we talking about post Gretsch Guild?

5

Here’s a better shot of the top of the pickup

6

What year Falcon is this? Can we see a picture of the entire guitar..even if just for fun? Maybe the Dearmonds are 60s. The 50s ones have sharper corners I think

7

She’s a 2008 LDS Falcon. Became a bit dissatisfied with the stock dynas so tried to find some old ones. Having installed these (which sound amazing by the way) I thought it looked pretty weird with chrome pickups and everything else gold so I started changing all the bits. I had the bigsby lying around from an 65 Hofner Verithin, got the Melita bridge cheap on eBay and the strap nuts and switch ring come off a 66 Tennessean apparently. The knobs, switchtip and bigsby handle are repros....I always loved the plain arrow knobs.

8

She’s a 2008 LDS Falcon. Became a bit dissatisfied with the stock dynas so tried to find some old ones. Having installed these (which sound amazing by the way) I thought it looked pretty weird with chrome pickups and everything else gold so I started changing all the bits. I had the bigsby lying around from an 65 Hofner Verithin, got the Melita bridge cheap on eBay and the strap nuts and switch ring come off a 66 Tennessean apparently. The knobs, switchtip and bigsby handle are repros....I always loved the plain arrow knobs.

– tabletop

That's a great looking guitar. I prefer a pickguard but that's up to personal taste. The Bigsby is a licensed Selmer (U.K.) made btw. These mostly are a few % smaller than the U.S. version but cool anyway. Play it in excellent health!

9

Interesting..,I didn’t know the selmer lincences ones were a little smaller. Good to know. Thanks very much !

10

You need flat screws for your Melita.

11

I’m actually surprised how much I’ve got used to the tall Melita bolts. Between the original gold synchrosonic bridge that was on it and this old Melita I had a bar bridge but I’ve totally adjusted to the Melita now.

12

Yeah, the big Melta screws are weird at first, but it's surprising how quickly you forget about them if you don't have a tantrum.

I'm almost certain DeArmond was still makings those pickups into the early '80s. The Gretsch-era DeArmonds (pre-1958/59) typically were wound to 8.5k-9.5k, give or take. Later ones were a bit hotter, but other than a few minor details (like bridge and neck heights, different lead wires) they are all basically the same pickup.

13

DeArmond production stopped prior to '83; when I got my '56 6120 the bridge pickup's bobbin had been cracked and there were no replacements to be found anywhere. A used white bobbin Dearmond was repotted into my pups casing and and it sounded just like my neck pup. Billy Zoom would probably know for sure when they stopped production.

When I say "Guild-era" I just mean that Gretsch stopped using them in '58 after the Clipper was discontinued/reconfigured. Guild started using the white-bobbin version shortly thereafter using Dearmonds that now came in two configurations with new casings: neck and bridge. This is what was on Duane Eddy's Guild models, before they burdened him with humbuckers.

14

They were still used in the 60's & 70's by Kustom, Martin, Ibinez, and a bunch of others...however, DeArmond pickups and Melita bridges were the most common aftermarket pickup and bridges available. They were both in the display cases of hundreds of mom & pop music stores around the country. They were still turning up new well into the 90's.


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