Other Guitars

what wood you do

1

Well after getting lost on the return trip, the broken headstock 2008 SG Diablo.. best SG I ever had.. got back here. There was eloquent/erudite/scholarly/academic discussion of the physics and kinetics of headstock breaks.

So U see it again -- would you have it fixed or just sell as is? Some say you would make out better leaving the fix to the buyer, because even if a first rate job is done, someone will complain about how it was done.

Would you put it out for $500 as is and see where it goes? I am hearing $150 for good repair... it's almost totally off except for face of headstock veneer...

4

Well what if you got it fixed, honestly advertised and sold it again, and it again broke in transit? Probably better off selling as is or parting imo.

Edit- nothing against Curt or any other luthier. I was typing as Wabash posted his comment.

5

He's back in my ancestral home of NJ -- I"m in MD but still spin thru there a fair amount. I"m shipping-phobic now.

6

A good glue joint is just as strong as the original wood. Though it looks horrifics this is no big deal. My 64 Tennessean has had the head stock broken of 10 times. I have played it for 25 years live, It almost never goes out of tune.

If you like the guitar and don't care about seeing the crack you could fix it yourself with carpenters glue clamps and clamping cauls. 24 hours later it would be just as functional . Or spend the money if you want someone to respray the head and try to hide the repair for aesthetics.

7

Depends. Did you get reimbursed? If it is truly the best SG ever, get it fixed and play it.

8

What I would do, as Bob said, is get it fixed and then play it. If you really want to sell it down the line, then sell it locally for a good price. That way, the buyer could try it out and know it's a great guitar, despite the damage. My beloved dreadnought has a surface split in the top, but I love it and it plays and sounds great.

9

+1 to what Frank said.

A headstock break makes me nervous (as a buyer0, despite how much everyone says that the glued wood is stronger (I know it is, I have woodworking friends that I trust that tell me that, and I GET it, but still....)

10

Prices on headstock repair are all over the place and most fixer people will give you options. To do it right in my opinion you need to refinish the neck.

Here’s an L4 I finished today. I’ve got 8 hours into this and $50 in material, $150.00 wouldn’t get it done.

https://www.oldschoolguitar...

11

Depends. Did you get reimbursed? If it is truly the best SG ever, get it fixed and play it.

– Bob Howard

Basically I agree. For me a lot would depend on the guitar's value before the break.

If you are OK with wood working, Toxophillite is right -- aliphatic resin ("yellow") wood glues (Titebond II, etc.) are extremely strong, often stronger than the basic wood itself. Clamp the repair for a couple of hours (or more) and let it cure for MINIMUM of 24 hours (longer is better) before handling and restringing.

The repair will be visible. The cosmetic work to hide it is what gets expensive -- that work requires a LOT of skill and takes a lot of time.

12

As Frank Ford mentions Titebond type glues creep so you would have seasonal gaps that come and go. For things like headstocks that are never to come apart invest in West System epoxy. Mix it up, let it soak into the wood for a couple minutes and clamp. With epoxy you don’t want to over clamp.

13

Just my 2 cents. If you love the guitar I'd get it fixed by a luthier you trust. I'm an hour from Curt and also know another more local luthier I trust so for me it would be relatively easy (except having to pay for it). Depending where you are in MD and don't mind the drive, you could hand deliver and pick it up from Curt for piece of mind. It would be done right and I am guessing based upon the opaque finish, the repair would probably be pretty much invisible to the untrained eye and you would have your baby back, better than new.

14

My 1969 SG Std. fell over during a tornado and broke just like yours. It happened back in the late 1980's. I has it glued and you can hardly see the repair even though there was no touch up. It has been stable ever since. Because of the break I never sold it when I stopped playing for many years. If it hadn't broke it would be gone by now. Thanks john

15

Best acoustic Guitar I ever had was a 66 Guild F47 that had a headstock repair, traded it to a friend in France, still miss it. If it’s done right, it’ll be fine imo.

16

Prices on headstock repair are all over the place and most fixer people will give you options. To do it right in my opinion you need to refinish the neck.

Here’s an L4 I finished today. I’ve got 8 hours into this and $50 in material, $150.00 wouldn’t get it done.

https://www.oldschoolguitar...

– Curt Wilson

A bit off topic, but to me it seems necessary: Curt, you do such beautiful work it is always a bit difficult to wrap my brain around the "before" when I see your "after." Artistry. Pure artistry.

17

Easy fix, nice long grain to long grain break. Decent glue job and it'll be better than new.

18

The sucky part of this is that, even if fixed to Near-as-new condition, you have put good money into a guitar that is now worth less than before. Assume it was worth $2000, now subtract $500 for a repair, then another $500 for devaluation. Your $2000 sale is now $1500 (net is $1000).

If you originally paid $2000, then you are $1000 in the hole. If you don’t fix it, you’re $2000 in the hole. Rock and hard place, unless you plan to keep it and play the frets off it. Then $500 is worth it.

19

I’m with Curt. Use West System epoxy. NEVER moves. I not only use it for repairs like this, but it is what I use for structural repairs on my ocean going sailboat. The forces encountered on the water with a 20,000.00 lb boat, far exceed whatever the neck will ever see.

20

I had a break exactly like that on a P bass. My luthier fixed her right up with Tite Bond. His comment was there was a lot of surface area for the glue to set up and strengthen. I assisted as he applied the glue, set a couple of clamps on it and allowed it to set for 24 hours. Did the job!

21

After having read comments by others I say do it yourself. It was helpful having witnessed a professional perform the task to help me realize that it really was a simple operation. Obviously do not detach the the broken headstock from the neck for it will go a long ways towards keeping the break lined up.

22

The issue as I see it is that the original post questions whether to fix it or sell it as is. There is no mention of keeping it. Although I agree that there are times when fixing may be worth it if one plans on keeping the guitar, this one is a selling situation. No matter how good the repair, it is probably lost money for the seller and a good deal for the buyer.

23

Good point, Baba. Considering DCBirdMan is famous for guitar flipping my point is probably moot.


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