Other Guitars

Tedesco guitar collection @ auction

1

Late great Wrecking Crew-man -- over @ ha.com (Heritage Auctions)

2

I always wanted an original es-150; the Ampeg R-12-R is pretty cool too.

3

Seems like there are more and more of these type auctions, very few of the guitars are important. Nice guitars, not the special ones...

I cannot imagine how many free guitars some of these renown players have been asked to try, use, and be photographed with at some point.

4

The wrecking crew Epi is perhaps somewhat interesting, but mostly to autograph collectors..

5

There's a sweet '55 Country Club in Cadillac Green for $3,750 currently.

Here

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I like the Heritage Auction site...would need to dig a bit deeper about the Seller/Buyer premiums.

I guess the question is when might HA be more appropriate than Reverb or EBay or a Dealer like Gruhn or Carter or Rumble or Norm's...

Some day I expect to join that big music venue in the sky, too!

But, then, there is Christie's and Sotheby's...

I went and looked at the Richard Gere gear while in NYC, then Clapton sold off his warehouse of freebies, and Entwhistle had enough crazy stuff to fill a Department Store!

P.S. Tommy passed in 1997, long time coming to Market...

7

i'm rather amazed that a TT collection still exists given how long it's been since he passed.

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There are a few of Tommy's more well-known guitars in the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville. I can understand his family holding on to these guitars for as long as possible.

9

I wouldn't mind having one of his Yamaha archtops. That's what I always saw him playing whenever I saw him perform. One of the Ovation nylon-stringers would be cool, too, if it weren't for that lap convexity problem I have with Ovations, that isn't the guitar's fault.

10

I wouldn't mind having one of his Yamaha archtops. That's what I always saw him playing whenever I saw him perform. One of the Ovation nylon-stringers would be cool, too, if it weren't for that lap convexity problem I have with Ovations, that isn't the guitar's fault.

– giffenf

Frank, I haven't seen too many of our generation that are built for Ovations.

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i'm not sure anyone's built for an Ovation...the guys i knew who owned them back in the day, when they were premium instruments, used straps.

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Straps as in multiple? I believe it.

14

I know Tedesco's guitars outnumber his by far in this auction, but... no mention at all of Barney Kessel? Not that many of us could afford it, but look at the most historically significant (by far) instrument in this auction. As the description says: "A very iconic guitar from one of the true legends of the instrument"

https://entertainment.ha.co...

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i'm not sure anyone's built for an Ovation...the guys i knew who owned them back in the day, when they were premium instruments, used straps.

– macphisto

Even with a strap, I'm not built for one. Concave against concave.

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I saw the Kessel guitar, did Tedesco end up with it? Nice guitar, has a substantial bid on it!

As for Ovation, about a decade ago they started the Deep Contour Back - solves the sliding around. One of my herd favorites...2080-NWT

Here are a few pictures and adverts...

https://www.google.com/sear...

17

I saw the Kessel guitar, did Tedesco end up with it?

The auction is labeled as "The Guitars of the Wrecking Crew". Kessel was part of the Wrecking Crew, along with Tedesco. There are other Kessel instruments in the auction. Kessel's widow consigned them to the auction. So no, Tedesco did not "end up with it".

Nice guitar, has a substantial bid on it!

In all honesty, it's probably not really a "nice guitar" (in the heavily modified and repaired condition it's in) to most players/collectors. The reason for the substantial bid, and the reason it does appeal to some collectors, is all about its history. It was practically the only guitar that Kessel used throughout his long and legendary career. It's iconic.

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I remember a show on Barney, with him chatting through Music and Guitars. He was keen to point out the Guitar was a tool, and he needed it to be such to allow him to make Music. No more, no less.

So, when you think through the "Kay" disaster, then the "Gibson" model, this one is a curiosity.

Barney passed in 2004, again a long time coming to market.

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I remember a show on Barney, with him chatting through Music and Guitars. He was keen to point out the Guitar was a tool, and he needed it to be such to allow him to make Music. No more, no less.

Yes, you're right. I've seen the same video, and he's made the same comments in interviews over the years. It seems likely that he painted over the "Gibson" logo following his problems with the company; I think he said the dot inlays were less distracting to him than the original double parallelograms; and he said that he opted for the pointer knobs because he could feel where they were set without having to look at them.

Barney passed in 2004, again a long time coming to market.

Indeed. I had read that there were a few well-known jazz guitarists who were interested in the guitar (this was some years back), with Bruce Forman being one name I remember coming up. Anyway, perhaps there was some doubt in Barney's widow's mind about where the guitar should go, and/or perhaps she held onto if for awhile for sentimental reasons. It would certainly be understandable.

The last price I saw before the online bidding ended was $17K (about $21.5K with the buyer's premium). The auction wasn't technically over at that point, though. I'm not registered at Heritage, so I can't see what the official final sale price was. Anyway, considering the intrinsic market value for a 350 in that condition, I suppose that $21.5K is at least a decent result for an iconic piece of guitar history.

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Thank you for posting that, Deed.


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