Other Guitars

Supro takes aim at the Bigsby-equipped semi-hollow market

2

Love the gold foil pickups! I have a Supro Westbury and the tone is amazing! I like the Gold Foil pickups so much, I put a set in my Gretsch 5420 as an experiment ant they are staying in, amazing tone!

3

Pickups are interesting but I find the guitars a bit creepy. Too mid life crisis style. And unfortunately I guess I'm post that era. So I'm reliving my youth anyhow

4

They look and sound great But not for me.

5

Oh man yuck. That takes everything I dislike about Supro's default guitar shape and makes it immeasurably worse. They'd have to sound unimaginably better than my favorite guitars to even tempt me to accept the atrocious visuals. And I'd have to be blindfolded when I first heard one, or I'd never approach it.

I do want to try some gold foils though. Haven't heard any in person since they were used in low end Japanese guitars of the 60s, and at that time any electric guitar was a good electric guitar. I wasn't discriminating between the sound of pickups or the effects of body construction.

6

Well, Supro better known for their amps.

If a killer clean Supro / Gretsch 1-12 w/ trem came along, I would want to try it. Forget if Supro reverb was down @ the Danelectro amp level of sucky reverb.

But back to guitars-- they are just trying everything these days, old and new, old combined w/ new. I guess they just hope something catches on.

7

I’d like to try the Clermont. Hoping they someday end up a Stupid Deal or on the rack at Music Go Round.

Wonder how Hofner feels about those tea cup knobs.

8

they are just trying everything these days, old and new, old combined w/ new.

And I don't mind a kind a latter-day retro-modernized revival of the Supro name. They've stayed true to the cosmetics of both amps (good) and guitars (notso), while honoring and improving on whatever distinctive tone their gear accidentally had down there at the low end of US production in the 60s. I like what I've heard of the amps; it seems more than mere nostalgia. The prices, of course, slot into a higher shelf of the market than Supro products did when they were all Valco-sixties.

I have considerable respect for David Koltai of Absara, the parent company for both the Pigtronix brand name and Supro, which he bought from Bruce Zinky in 2013. Pigtronix pedals are original and quirky (perhaps borrowing some inspiration from fellow New York pedal visionary and godfather, the incomparable Mike Matthews), always offering tricks you don't get from the hordes of me-too pedalers. I don't always get along with Pigtronix pedals, but I admire Koltai's ambition, vision, and close attention to what makes a product unique.

I think he's brought the same sensibility to the Supro range; it's clear from his take on the brand that he understands what it's about, and strives to maintain, improve, and perpetuate its distinctive identity. (Good article here: https://reverb.com/news/how...)

It's not his fault some Supro guitars were so ugly (other than the gorgeous headstock); in guitar cosmetics, he's just bringing back what Valco wrought way back when.

I should probably have a modern Supro amp, just because the brand was so ubiquitous among the guys I played with as a kid. Prior to the Japanese guitars that started arriving in the mid-late 60s, if you couldn't afford Gibson or Fender, you had Valco and Silvertone/Dano. Americans doing good work on the cheap, and godblessem.

A Kalamazoo SG cranked through a Supro amp gave me my first in-person blast of What It Was All About: a 5th grade buddy and I stole away during recess to a dark storage room in the school basement, where he cranked the amp and delivered the riffs for "You Really Got Me" and "All Day and All of the Night."

That's it. I'd been glued to Top 40 radio since before the Beatles, then I'd been Beatled, and the British had invaded - though I'd never heard had the chance to hear the music live. After this encounter with raucous rawk, I was a goner.

And since the only other kid I knew who owned an electric guitar had a red Supro (that looked like an implement of sci-fi)...I come by my Supro sensitivity honestly.

Just wish the amps were as cheap now as they were then!

9

Huh. I don't find anything objectionable about the shape. These and others like them are derivative of Roger Rossmeisl's work a the Electro String Instrument Corporation.

And I know one person here who's not a big fan of his aesthetic sensibilities.

10

Well there you go. Although I understand he's responsible for the 4001 and the 620, and they're both sublime enough to redeem the rest of his ideas.

I remain firmly ambivalent about the "German carve."

11

I like the shape (headstock too!), but that "f"-hole is atrocious. Looks like a tribal tattoo or something similarly non committal. About as tacky on a mid-range guitar as the headstock on the new D'Angelicos (which, don't even get me started...).

12

From a design aesthetic, it's neither one thing or the other. Tweak existing designs, recreate something that might/could have been...i understand. But these? Really? It looksike the kind decor you get when men buy a house at auction. I'd go as far as saying it doesn't qualify as being 'designed'.

13

I'm happier looking through the Eastwood/Airline catalogue.

14

Love it. The street price might be around $700.

Hope to see one in store to try.

15

They have a nice vibe about them.. the ones in the article make my teeth hurt but I like what they are doing.

16

As I'm sure I've posted elsewhere on the forum previously, traditionally shaped f-holes on guitars are visual anathema to me (I find them, and their typical outline, a pointless holdover from centuries of bowed stringed instrument design, one that [generally] does not mesh well with the sizes and shapes/contours of most guitars upon which they are found), so, I do like the atypically shaped soundhole on these new Supro centerblock semis (see the accompanying photo of a hollowbody of mine and you'll understand why), and would consider buying one of these guitars if they're ever offered in a color that appeals to me.

17

Gotta say I am not a fan of Modern World F-holes. That includes Gretsch cat's eye.... trad or nothing for me.

18

Same, never seen a design that improves upon the f-hole

19

I like the shape (headstock too!), but that "f"-hole is atrocious. Looks like a tribal tattoo or something similarly non committal. About as tacky on a mid-range guitar as the headstock on the new D'Angelicos (which, don't even get me started...).

– Otter

agreed. Whoever thought that F-hole was good needs to be removed from the guitar industry. It's painfully ugly.

20

I think the F hole counts for a lot. That classic shape found in 6120s is essential to me in a Gretsch's appeal. Anything squatter, smaller, straighter etc just don't work for me.

21

As I'm sure I've posted elsewhere on the forum previously, traditionally shaped f-holes on guitars are visual anathema to me (I find them, and their typical outline, a pointless holdover from centuries of bowed stringed instrument design, one that [generally] does not mesh well with the sizes and shapes/contours of most guitars upon which they are found), so, I do like the atypically shaped soundhole on these new Supro centerblock semis (see the accompanying photo of a hollowbody of mine and you'll understand why), and would consider buying one of these guitars if they're ever offered in a color that appeals to me.

– Lacking Talent

Traditional f-holes do serve a purpose...so they are not pointless holdovers. The center of the f-hole is the point at which the bridge should run parallel to. So, a guitar with a floating bridge should use the middle line you would get by connecting the two f-holes with a horizontal line across the body of the guitar as the place where you put the bridge. And then adjust accordingly from there. Guitars with floating bridges without some sort of visual cue for bridge placement are missing a key component. I think guitars that provide other cues for bridge placement are free to use whatever goofy f-hole design they want. But there’s something to be said for a traditional form that serves a purpose.

23

I think the F hole counts for a lot. That classic shape found in 6120s is essential to me in a Gretsch's appeal. Anything squatter, smaller, straighter etc just don't work for me.

– Vince_Ray

Yep, they're just beautiful to me too.

24

mama always said "If you can't say something nice..."

25

mama always said "If you can't say something nice..."

– Daniel Weldon

Yeah, but there was something wonderfully 'wrong' about those old Supros and Airline guitars. The juvenile delinquent cousins of the bigger brands. Snotty, full of attitude and they had a unique vibe in a world of what became generic guitar design. The new models seem wrong in the wrong way.

Hard to please? Damn right. Sorry about that. They could be cooler, or just stick to reissuing the originals.


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