Other Guitars

Random ‘65 Guild Starfire 3 question.

1

I bought this guitar from forum member wyowill a few months back. It feels good in my hands and I can find a sweet spot for both the neck and the bridge pickups. The middle position is another story. I believe it’s wired out of phase.

My instinct is to rewire it. But before I do, is there something I’m missing?

What’s the appeal?

Lovely guitar, no complaints. Just trying to understand it’s application a bit better.

Appreciate your input.

thrive

3

My only struggle is getting a good middle position tone.

Could live on the neck pickup alone through a reverb deluxe or an ac15 pushed hard.

Mid seams nasally and “quacky”!

Just curious if that’s ever a desired tone, and why?

Am I missing something?

Flourish

4

well, that's basically the purpose of the 2 and 4 positions on a 5-way Strat switch.

5

That was my experience with it, too. Gorgeous, felt great, sounded really good on either pickup alone, but that out of phase middle sound didn't work at all for me. Turning one or the other volumes higher or lower than the other helped, but it still wasn't as useful to me as in phase pickups are. I thought about rewiring it, too. If you do, I'd love to hear your thoughts on the results.

6

Thanks for your assessment wyowill! Glad to know it’s not just me. I really do like it. As I mentioned earlier, it fits my hand nicely, plays wonderfully and looks great. I just can’t find a middle position tone I can get on with.

maybe some emg’s ?

Kidding

7

if you do that i'd be happy to take the Gold Tones off you. j/k

8

Rewire it. It probably wants you to.

9

rewire it. It's really easy on Guilds, pull one of the pickups and you'll see the wiring tab on the pickup baseplate. Flip the coil wires, make sure to have the hot apart from any ground wires that connect to the baseplate, done.

Just curious if that’s ever a desired tone, and why?

It is, absolutely. the beauty of two pickups out of phase is playing with the individual pickup volumes so you can have different degrees of out-of-phase-ness. Doesn't work all that great in vintage Guilds, because of the way the volume pots are wired - you can barely use them before they turn to full mud/lose all treble. Listen to BB King or Peter Green, T-Bone Walker or early Jimmy Nolen for great out of phase tones.

well, that's basically the purpose of the 2 and 4 positions on a 5-way Strat switch.

No, it isn't. the 2 and 4 positions of a strat are actually in phase, and the "quack" effect you're hearing is the phase cancellation that happens between two identical coils that are fairly close to each other. You actually get a similar effect in a Filtertron pickup.

10

One of the world's greatest thin line hollow body guitars.

Watch Glasgow's Joe Moretti with one here although his model had De Armond pickups.

Joe, a great player, was the guitarist on this UK hit.

Complete with cigarette lighter slide!

11

After reading Walter's comment I wish I'd have kept it and rewired it. :)

That's exactly what this one did: either pickup full open was great, slight rolloff went straight to Mudsville, with very little ability to blend the middle.

Oh, well, rewire and enjoy, Sourpuss!

12

Did I read in the original for-sale posting mention that the guitar has a low-rider TruArc? I've got a '67 that looks identical that I was thinking of putting a TruArc on. 12" radius fretboard?
Remember why the low-rider was needed? I can probably figure that out by trying one of my other TruArcs on the guitar but I don't have time right away.

My guitar came with the (original?) aluminum Bigsby style offset bridge (sort of like a non-adjustable tune-o-matic) and then an actual tune-o-matic on the guitar. It works surprisingly well with the vibrato but I've come to like the aluminum TruArc tone and think that might work yet better still.

I have a lot of Connecticut made Guild guitars and they all are solid, sound good and play great. This one was the gateway guitar into Gretschdom for me - years ago before the Electromatic craze I couldn't afford a real vintage Gretsch and found the Starfire III. It has it's own thing going which is cool too. So I keep it : )

13

Did I read in the original for-sale posting mention that the guitar has a low-rider TruArc? I've got a '67 that looks identical that I was thinking of putting a TruArc on. 12" radius fretboard?
Remember why the low-rider was needed? I can probably figure that out by trying one of my other TruArcs on the guitar but I don't have time right away.

My guitar came with the (original?) aluminum Bigsby style offset bridge (sort of like a non-adjustable tune-o-matic) and then an actual tune-o-matic on the guitar. It works surprisingly well with the vibrato but I've come to like the aluminum TruArc tone and think that might work yet better still.

I have a lot of Connecticut made Guild guitars and they all are solid, sound good and play great. This one was the gateway guitar into Gretschdom for me - years ago before the Electromatic craze I couldn't afford a real vintage Gretsch and found the Starfire III. It has it's own thing going which is cool too. So I keep it : )

– vibrotwang

It has a stainless lowrider tru-arc and came with the aluminum Bigsby bridge in the case.

As I didn’t make the change, I cannot attest as to why a lowrider was selected.

I can attest to the set up and feel being very good.

I also have an Oxnard, CA M-20E, a New Haven, CT F-412, a Tacoma, WA D-40 a Korean X-175B as well as, 2) mid ‘60’s Guild Thunder 1’s and a Thunderbird (at times I consider it my favorite amp) that were manufactured in Linden, NJ (I believe).

I’m impressed with the entire line, regardless of origin

14

After reading Walter's comment I wish I'd have kept it and rewired it. :)

That's exactly what this one did: either pickup full open was great, slight rolloff went straight to Mudsville, with very little ability to blend the middle.

Oh, well, rewire and enjoy, Sourpuss!

– wyowill

Yes! Walter shared some useful knowledge, as did you!

Thanks, both of you!!

I’m going to address it at some point.

15

It has a stainless lowrider tru-arc and came with the aluminum Bigsby bridge in the case.

As I didn’t make the change, I cannot attest as to why a lowrider was selected.

I can attest to the set up and feel being very good.

I also have an Oxnard, CA M-20E, a New Haven, CT F-412, a Tacoma, WA D-40 a Korean X-175B as well as, 2) mid ‘60’s Guild Thunder 1’s and a Thunderbird (at times I consider it my favorite amp) that were manufactured in Linden, NJ (I believe).

I’m impressed with the entire line, regardless of origin

– Sourpuss

Nice collection and thank you for the reply.

Here's a Guild that I would pursue if I had infinite resources:

Love for the DE 500

16

that were manufactured in Linden, NJ (I believe).

Close, but it was Hoboken (I grew up across the river on Staten Island)

Ampeg was made in Linden.

17

that were manufactured in Linden, NJ (I believe).

Close, but it was Hoboken (I grew up across the river on Staten Island)

Ampeg was made in Linden.

– WinnieThomas

Thank you for the correction. I’ve read that, despite proximity, Guild amps were not produced by Ampeg. But for some unknown reason, I thought they were produced near, but not in Hoboken.

Linden sprang to mind and I rolled with it.

After seeing your post, I looked at my amps and the only attribution I could find did indeed say Hoboken.

18

As I understand it, the early Guild amps were assembled in the Hoboken NJ guitar factory from kits supplied by Ampeg.

My 1961 66J model certainly looks and sounds like an Ampeg.

19

That was my experience with it, too. Gorgeous, felt great, sounded really good on either pickup alone, but that out of phase middle sound didn't work at all for me. Turning one or the other volumes higher or lower than the other helped, but it still wasn't as useful to me as in phase pickups are. I thought about rewiring it, too. If you do, I'd love to hear your thoughts on the results.

– wyowill

Just wanted to follow up with you after rewiring

I’m sorry to report, it sounds great!

Just got it and another guitar back from the shop.

This sounds much better wired in phase.

Thanks also to Walter for chiming in. I had reservations about altering the stock circuit.

Thrive!


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