Other Guitars

Peerless Wizard Jazz Box

1

I ran across this looking at an Ebay store at Jazz Box's, and was wondering if anyone has any experience or knowledge of this maker. no afil

Link

Heres a link with this model with an added bigsby Link

2

The New Jersey store, Guitars N' Jazz has the entire line. There are so many models.

4

Peerless is a Korean manufacturer who used to make Electromatics for Gretsch. Good quality for a reasonable price.

5

Peerless is one of the best. If not truly peerless, they're as good as it gets in Korean manufacture. (Equal, I think, to SPG - who, last I knew, makes Gretschs now - and whoever builds for Reverend.) Besides some early Electromatics, Peerless also made the higher-end Carlo Robelli archtop models around the same time - and some have the same specs as Electromatics of the era.

I have two (one a blond version of tub's ES-5-alike), and have never considered parting with either.

Over the years they've built for many other brands as well - and in fact were a contract builder only in pre-internet days. I think it's only in the last 10 years they've started marketing under their own brand name.

Several years ago, an unscrupulous American Peerless dealer was making false claims about who all Peerless builds for; I contacted Peerless and got an immediate reply from someone who was horrified, and promised to put a quick end to that. (And, as I recall, did.)

No reason to doubt or hesitate when it comes to Peerless.

6

A younger guy I know got a Peerless archtop recently, used, and it ended up on the bench of my luthier buddy because it behaved strangely - so full of dead spots that it practically had a dead string and a half - acoustically completely unbalanced that way, and that translated into the amplified tone as well. (I don't know of the name of the model, an acoustic archtop with a floating pickup).

It turned out to have some of the strangest, most unorthodox top bracing I've seen on a recent production factory made archtop, something that looked like an odd mix of paralell bracing and ladder bracing (much like a Selmer Macaferri archtop), and the bracing appeared to be part of the top - as if the top and the bracing were the same piece of wood.

But it obviously didn't work - the guitar was a mess that different strings or bridge adjustments couldn't save. My friend ended up putting a pretty hefty soundpost under the bridge, and while that killed more than half of the acoustic response of the guitar, at least it made the guitar more balanced and made the dead string/dead spots problem a lot better. Still not ideal, but the guitar became usable, because it really wasn't before.

Probably a lemon that shouldn't have left the factory, but it still looked like the "unique" bracing was at least a fairly big part of what caused the guitar to behave as it did.

I won't be spending any money on any Peerless branded guitars in any case.

7

A younger guy I know got a Peerless archtop recently, used, and it ended up on the bench of my luthier buddy because it behaved strangely - so full of dead spots that it practically had a dead string and a half - acoustically completely unbalanced that way, and that translated into the amplified tone as well. (I don't know of the name of the model, an acoustic archtop with a floating pickup).

It turned out to have some of the strangest, most unorthodox top bracing I've seen on a recent production factory made archtop, something that looked like an odd mix of paralell bracing and ladder bracing (much like a Selmer Macaferri archtop), and the bracing appeared to be part of the top - as if the top and the bracing were the same piece of wood.

But it obviously didn't work - the guitar was a mess that different strings or bridge adjustments couldn't save. My friend ended up putting a pretty hefty soundpost under the bridge, and while that killed more than half of the acoustic response of the guitar, at least it made the guitar more balanced and made the dead string/dead spots problem a lot better. Still not ideal, but the guitar became usable, because it really wasn't before.

Probably a lemon that shouldn't have left the factory, but it still looked like the "unique" bracing was at least a fairly big part of what caused the guitar to behave as it did.

I won't be spending any money on any Peerless branded guitars in any case.

– WB

I‘m both sorry and surprised to read that as every single Peerless made guitar I played was of good quality. Apart from a recent Casino variant they’ve been all „pre-Peerless“ brand, though. I do own an Epiphone Casino that after a pickup swap is nothing but a fantastic instrument.


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