Other Guitars

NGD — Offset Heaven

51

John, I haven't concluded yet that I really need them. I read online about how everyone suggests that strings pop out all of the time, but I haven't experienced that yet. I don't beat the strings on my guitars when I play, so I am hoping that this will not be a problem for me. I suppose that, like with the after-market bridges for Gretsch guitars, many will suggest that the Mastery provides tonal advantages. Thus far, however, I like the tone that I hear. But, I am open to making changes if the need arises.

– Ric12string

Bob, go with your gut on this one. After reading all your replies you are leaning to you don't need it, I think you are correct. The Mastery is a great bridge and is spectacular for a Bigsby equipped Telecaster. I love mine but on your two guitars where you have no real break angle or intonation problems, I think it would be mostly a cool looking piece of jewelry. As far as sustain there wasn't a real noticeable difference for me. I think your gut is telling you nah, for your guitars in question, and so does mine. If you get a bigsby telecaster I would say you really really should get a Mastery.

52

Late again......

Bob -- congratulations on your jaw-dropping gorgeous guitar(s)!! When will a silverface Deluxe Reverb be joining your fleet??

I agree with you on the subject of surf sounds and sustain. I used to wonder if Carl Wilson used some sort of "light touch" mute.....

53

When will a silverface Deluxe Reverb be joining your fleet?? -- senojnad

You are in the wrong profession, Dan. You should be a sleuth.

Actually, I am looking for a Fender amplifier. I have never owned one before. My amps have been Mesa Boogie, Vox, and Gretsch. I will most likely pick up the blackface reissue of the Deluxe Reverb. I have talked to a number of players in recent days about that amp and they have uniformly told me that the amp sounds good. I have read some online reviews of people saying that the amp sounds a bit harsh. While I have no proof of this, I suspect that those remarks have come from people who don't really play out all that much. I need something pretty rugged and dependable and that gives me that classic clean sound.

I do like the silverface Deluxe Reverb that I have played through recently. If one from the late 60s were to drop in my lap for a reasonable price, I would certainly consider it. A friend of mine has told me that they are very reliable amplifiers with an uncomplicated architecture such that techs find them quite easy to work on. Until then, however, I think that the DRRI will most likely be what I settle in with.

54

Going for the full Carl Wilson spanky clean surf sound, eh? A blackface Deluxe is the right sound. Not at all harsh. It's the smooth sound you think it is.

One caveat. The guitar player in my last band has been gigging with his re-issue blackface Deluxe Reverb for the last ten years with no trouble at all. I had one for a couple of years and it was a lemon. It went back to my tech three different times because of components on the circuit board going bad. Each time my tech pointed to a burnt component and said "this wouldn't happen on a hand wired amps".

55

FWIW, I like the StayTrem vibrato arm too. Far better than the plumber's tape I used previously to keep the arm in place.

If you find you have strings slipping in the saddles, you can always file a deeper channel, and if that doesn't work, a neck shim does wonders.

JMs and Jags are great guitars, and their idiosyncrasies are part of their charm.

56

When will a silverface Deluxe Reverb be joining your fleet?? -- senojnad

You are in the wrong profession, Dan. You should be a sleuth.

Actually, I am looking for a Fender amplifier. I have never owned one before. My amps have been Mesa Boogie, Vox, and Gretsch. I will most likely pick up the blackface reissue of the Deluxe Reverb. I have talked to a number of players in recent days about that amp and they have uniformly told me that the amp sounds good. I have read some online reviews of people saying that the amp sounds a bit harsh. While I have no proof of this, I suspect that those remarks have come from people who don't really play out all that much. I need something pretty rugged and dependable and that gives me that classic clean sound.

I do like the silverface Deluxe Reverb that I have played through recently. If one from the late 60s were to drop in my lap for a reasonable price, I would certainly consider it. A friend of mine has told me that they are very reliable amplifiers with an uncomplicated architecture such that techs find them quite easy to work on. Until then, however, I think that the DRRI will most likely be what I settle in with.

– Ric12string

Bob, I seem to recall you owning a Gretsch Executive amp. If that's not the case, ignore this post.

If that is the case, I'd have to discourage you from picking up a DR. The Executive, for all intents and purposes, is a Deluxe Reverb. I mean they're identical (ok, there are a couple different capacitors, seemingly to reduce bass). Unless you need the 12" speaker, or the normal channel, or just the sentiment of owning a Fender amplifier (I've been there), you're not gaining any new sounds. If you do need a DR, get the Silverface instead of a RI.

Also, congrats on the Jaguar. That's a fine guitar right there.

Edit: I did find a more meaningful difference. In the Executive, the tremolo and reverb are in parallel (so the reverberations aren't subject to tremolo, and viceversa) compared to the series setup of the Deluxe (Reverb into Tremolo).

57

Otter, you are indeed correct that I own an Executive. And I am aware that there are many similarities to the DRRI. But, there are several reasons why I don't want to take that one out to the rock and roll gigs any more, probably first and foremost is that the amp is so good looking that I know that I am going to begin to tear it up pretty bad when I gig regularly with it. I have gigged a little with the Executive and have loved having it.

If I purchase one, I think that the DRRI would be a real workhorse.

I am also looking to reduce some of the weight and bulk of the Executive, which I think can be done with a DRRI.

And good point about the reverb and tremolo being in series or parallel. A couple of my friends have recommended to me just putting a Strymon Flint in front of the amp and be done with the onboard reverb and tremolo. I haven't personally listened to the Flint, but those whom I trust have highly recommended it and the reviews I have read online have been quite good.

58

Otter, you are indeed correct that I own an Executive. And I am aware that there are many similarities to the DRRI. But, there are several reasons why I don't want to take that one out to the rock and roll gigs any more, probably first and foremost is that the amp is so good looking that I know that I am going to begin to tear it up pretty bad when I gig regularly with it. I have gigged a little with the Executive and have loved having it.

If I purchase one, I think that the DRRI would be a real workhorse.

I am also looking to reduce some of the weight and bulk of the Executive, which I think can be done with a DRRI.

And good point about the reverb and tremolo being in series or parallel. A couple of my friends have recommended to me just putting a Strymon Flint in front of the amp and be done with the onboard reverb and tremolo. I haven't personally listened to the Flint, but those whom I trust have highly recommended it and the reviews I have read online have been quite good.

– Ric12string

That's as good a reason as any!

Funny you mention the Flint. I just bought one for myself, as I've been very much missing Reverb since selling my Twin Reverb in 2013. It is one of the better pedals I've owned (and the most expensive), and offers a great variety and quality of reverb and tremolo tones. However, unless you absolutely need (there's that word again, sorry) the other types of verb and trem, I don't think it can replace the onboard effects in the Deluxe or the Executive.

If you have other amps without these onboard effects, it's definitely nice to have. It pairs very nicely with my Silvertone, for example.

59

The drawback to the DRRI's onboard reverb is that you are limited in your ability to control its parameters. I think that the reverb pot on the amp is probably like the "mix" pot on a tank in that you can regulate how much reverb signal to mix in with the dry signal. But, there is no tone control or, importantly, no dwell control. With my limited knowledge, I have understood that the dwell control is pretty critical to getting a good reverb sound.

I suppose that the ultimate test would be if I bought a DRRI and then started to use the onboard reverb. If I was satisfied with its sound, then I wouldn't need the Flint.

One former touring musician with whom I spoke at some length about the DRRI made a good recommendation to me: Rent one. See how I like it. I thought that that was an excellent point to make. Test drive it.

60

Good idea, but rather than rent it, buy from Guitar Center and you have 45 days to return it. I do that a lot and they don't seem to mind. I asked the manager and he said they want people to be satisfied with their purchases so I should do it as much as I want. I must admit that this policy has caused me to spend more money than I otherwise would have.

61

Good idea, but rather than rent it, buy from Guitar Center and you have 45 days to return it. I do that a lot and they don't seem to mind. I asked the manager and he said they want people to be satisfied with their purchases so I should do it as much as I want. I must admit that this policy has caused me to spend more money than I otherwise would have.

– Bob Howard

Those guys aren't idjits, ya know!

62

Congratulations, Bob!

My first guitar, given to me in 1975 along with a blackface Twin Reverb, was a '62 Jaguar in sonic blue. But it was the '70s and sustain was a thing to have back then. Always a slave to fashion, I traded it fairly quickly for a '62 Stratocaster. In my defense, I still have both the Strat and the Twin Reverb.

It's odd that all the things that I disliked about it then are the very things I (and you, obviously) appreciate about it now: The lack of sustain, offset body, matching headstock, and the controls.

A Jaguar without a matching headstock always looks somehow wrong to me, so I'm glad that you and Curt were able to make it happen. I'd say that your perseverance and patience have definitely paid off.

63

Tim, the odd thing, in my mind, is that the Olympic White AV '65 Jazzmaster which I also own has a matching headstock, but the Jaguar did not.

And, yes, you can't have a Jaguar without having all of the controls. Some things are just meant to be idiosyncratic.

64

And, yes, you can't have a Jaguar without having all of the controls. Some things are just meant to be idiosyncratic. - Ric12string

Back then I just could not strum the guitar without switching off a pickup, kicking in the "strangle" switch, or knocking the bridge out of position.

My technique hasn't improved, but I don't think I'd mind as much now.


Register Sign in to join the conversation