Other Guitars

NGD: 2017 Les Paul Studio T in honeyburst

1

I'd been thinking about a Les Paul for some time. The ones I'd tried in past, I didn't like the necks. So I went out on an expedition yesterday and tried a few different LP models. Nope, just couldn't get with the way the necks felt, even the slim taper ones. I don't know if it's the binding over the fret ends, or what, but my hand just didn't like them. Tried a 2011 Traditional with a Bigbsy, beautiful black finish, but same problem with the neck, and man was it ever heavy!

Then I stopped into a store that sells used gear, looking for a reverb pedal (TC Hall of Fame) they had for sale. The pedal was gone but they had this 2017 Studio T in gorgeous honeyburst. I tried it. Quite liked the neck! No binding! Feels more accessible.

So I went back today and snatched it up.

It's got the ultra-modern weight relief, so it's not back-breaking heavy. And it's got push/pull coil-tap wiring for each pick-up, which are the 498T and the 490R. Grover tuners, speed knobs (which I may replace with witch-hats, but which witch-hats? )

I just LOVE the honeyburst finish, and the lack of more deluxe LP appointments doesn't bother me. Studios always looked a little too plain to me, but with this finish, the lack of binding on the body isn't such a big deal; the edge of the maple cap sorta gives the same impression as binding, so I like the way it looks. Looks more approachable, or something. Humble? Like a Telecaster in an LP body.

I'll change the strings, condition the fretboard, clean it up a bit and look under the hood. But so far I'm very happy with my first Les Paul (my first Gibson, actually). Especially for just over $1k!

6

Beauty. A great finish. Congrats

7

Very nice LP, I've always liked the honeyburst.

8

The LP Studios I've seen actually have a top wooden binding. Looks like yours has the same? I prefer unbound necks too.

9

Very nice guitar, I bought a new Les Paul Classic Cherry Burst about two weeks ago, with the Burstbucker 61 pickups and 2 way pots. These guitars rock, and I love the slimmer necks they're putting on them lately. I've had a couple of chances to play it with the boys, and they cut through the mix exceptionally well. They have great chord note clarity, that is second to none, I love these guitars! Congratulations, you scored a hit with this one!

10

Nice. I've found that I prefer the feel of necks without binding.

12

The LP Studios I've seen actually have a top wooden binding. Looks like yours has the same? I prefer unbound necks too.

– lx

I don't think it's binding. It's just where the maple cap meets the mahogany body.

15

Very nice guitar, I bought a new Les Paul Classic Cherry Burst about two weeks ago, with the Burstbucker 61 pickups and 2 way pots. These guitars rock, and I love the slimmer necks they're putting on them lately. I've had a couple of chances to play it with the boys, and they cut through the mix exceptionally well. They have great chord note clarity, that is second to none, I love these guitars! Congratulations, you scored a hit with this one!

– Wade H

I had thought that I would prefer more "vintage-y" pickups, like the Burstbuckers or the Classic 57s, but these pups (490R, 498T) really rock! Not sure if I'm as thrilled with the single-coil mode, but I've yet to explore them fully.

Do the Burstbuckers come with 4-conductor wires to allow for splitting? I thought they didn't, but the 57s do?

Currently have the tailpiece set up the normal way, raised a bit so the strings clear the back of the bridge, but I may experiment with the top-wrap method to see how that feels/sounds. People seem to have conflicting views on that issue.

16

I had thought that I would prefer more "vintage-y" pickups, like the Burstbuckers or the Classic 57s, but these pups (490R, 498T) really rock! Not sure if I'm as thrilled with the single-coil mode, but I've yet to explore them fully.

Do the Burstbuckers come with 4-conductor wires to allow for splitting? I thought they didn't, but the 57s do?

Currently have the tailpiece set up the normal way, raised a bit so the strings clear the back of the bridge, but I may experiment with the top-wrap method to see how that feels/sounds. People seem to have conflicting views on that issue.

– Jimbodiddley

Yes Jim, the 61 Burstbuckers on my Les Paul Classic have the push pull volume pots that are coil splitters. The tone pots are also push pull for phase reversing and bypass. Bypass means that if the bottom tone pot is pulled up, all of the pots are bypassed, and the pickups go straight to the output.

I've actually found some great tones using the coil taps, while it is not the same sound that something like a Stratocaster has, I don't think I'd want it to be. There's more than just pickups that gives a Stratocaster that marvelous spanky sound.

I'm still experimenting with the push pull pots, I only just got the guitar shortly before you got yours. Your guitar is beautiful, I bet it sounds amazing. There's nothing like a genuine Gibson Les Paul for that distinct tone they produce, it's something that you have to buy the real thing to get.

Congratulations again on the beautiful Les Paul you've acquired, I know that you will have many years of happiness with it. These guitars last for generations, I have my fathers Les Paul, that he bought in the late 50's, it's still very playable with the original frets.

17

Thanks Wade! That's good to know re: the pups. Congrats on your new LP as well. And having your dad's too! That's special.

I'm curious about the phase reverse push-pull too. Gets that Peter Green sound? Is that something I can mod with these new circuit boards?

You're right about the sound of a Les Paul. I love the sounds I get from my Gretsch, Tele and Ricky, but the LP is another thing altogether. It's great to have these variety of sounds, tones and feels to go to. Would love to get a P90 Les Paul someday down the road.

18

The Peter Green sound comes from a set of Seymour Duncan custom made pickups with the neck pup reverse mounted. With the selector switch in the middle position and the neck volume turned a notch or two lower than the bridge pup, it makes that marvelous "quack" tone, as Seymour calls it. You can check it out on their website, along with a YouTube demo. It took my breath away, but at north of $300 for the set it's a little more than I can afford right now. But one day...

19

The Peter Green sound comes from a set of Seymour Duncan custom made pickups with the neck pup reverse mounted. With the selector switch in the middle position and the neck volume turned a notch or two lower than the bridge pup, it makes that marvelous "quack" tone, as Seymour calls it. You can check it out on their website, along with a YouTube demo. It took my breath away, but at north of $300 for the set it's a little more than I can afford right now. But one day...

– Synchroslim

The "Peter Green sound" is two humbuckers out of phase. And the way to get two humbuckers out of phase is to open one of them up, and flip the magnet. Simple as that.

Peter Green's own Les Paul had the neck pickup mounted "the wrong way around" (exposed poles facing the guitar's bridge), and that has created a lot of confusion over the years, as quite a few people saw that and believed that was what made for "that sound" - it wasn't - his pickups were magnetically out of phase.

20

The sound also didn't make him Peter Green. Only being Peter Green could do that.

But it turns out that a lot of what made Peter Green was Danny Kirwan. For a few years they were one symbiotic Peter Daniel Kirwan-Green entity. It was very difficult to know which was which - until PG wrote himself a scrip out of the picture, and something in The True Real and Original Old Testament Fleetwood Mac still sounded like Fleetwood Mac.

Then, way too soon, Danny wrote himself out of the picture.

Sad that the two eerily aligned poles of that too-good-to-last two-headed four-handed one-souled guitar manifestation were inherently unstable, and endured so much genuine misery for decades - almost as if in payment for their talent, and the lasting joy they brought others. Few other guitarists so truly caught and personally lived that virulent a strain of the blues.

Anyway, Les Pauls. A good one is a great thing. I'm right with you on the honeyburst natural-"bound" Lester incarnation, Jimbo. I had the P90 50s version for 10 years or so. And I still have a cherryburst 70s Deluxe. No pickup wiring tricks - but the mini-hums are just brighter enough than 'buckers to satisfy when you need a Paul to be Paul, but speak with slightly shinier teeth.


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