Other Guitars

Modern Fender and the thick finishes.

1

You're one of the guys who think the modern Fender finishes feel a little thick and... like plastic? Maybe you're just right. This is from a current ebay auction. Brandnew guitar that got damaged at transport. Oh my.

2

Looks like you'd need Bondo to fill in that crater.

3

You can’t even just remove the whole finish as you’d get into trouble re-installing the hardware and setting up the guitar.

4

We've got potholes in some of our roads like that!

5

We've got potholes in Indiana that you can hide cars in---estimated 180K in Indy alone.

6

That can’t all be finish that’s missing from this guitar! Looks like some kinda false flag event to me.

7

Isn't that just the broken case, and the guitar's in natural?

8

Man! You could probably make a pick or two out of what fell off.

9

I had a MIM Fender Jazz bass in poly Lake Placid Blue that I bought used with damage to it. The 'chips' looked as deep as that, too! Had multiple, very thick layers of polyurethane applied.

11

In the 70s they had what was called the 'thick skin' finish. ... thought to be more durable. But a lot of stuff was wrong w/ 70s Fender guitars epecially the Heavy As Hell late 70s ones.

12

that seems a little excessive indeed.

That said, Fenders never had a thin finish, that's a bit of a myth.

13

It enhances the tone.

– Suprdave

It's called "Polytone"....

Definition of polytone. : utterance characterized by varied tone or pitch — compare monotone

Now, you would not want your Fender to be "monotone",...would you?

14

The burst 58/59 guitars had thin finishes on them that I've worked on but at some point they switched to that thick goop that would fill a crater on the moon.

If all that finish was removed it would set up just fine. Those old Fenders were smaller, not by a lot but smaller and thinner.

16

That can’t all be finish that’s missing from this guitar! Looks like some kinda false flag event to me.

– Hipbone

Different angle.

17

FMIC is also finishing the latest Gretsch guitars this way too.

18

FMIC is also finishing the latest Gretsch guitars this way too.

– BuddyHollywood

That's interesting....my '06 Power Tenny, which fortunately doesn't have any damage appears to have what looks and feels like a relatively thin albeit poly finish that while still glossy has slightly dulled a bit over the years. It's about the best poly finish I have seen if your standard is being similar in look to nitro lacquer. Fender, even on their nitro finished guitars has a tendency to go heavy on the grain filler I guess for a smoother finish or whatever. My MIJ ESP/Edwards Les Paul copy has a nitro finish that appears to be very hard and relatively thin and is starting to really sink into the grain of the wood. The faded Sonic Blue finish (and clear finish on the neck) on my MIM Classic Player 60's Tele looks great and has none of the stickiness that poly finished Fenders are known for but my guess is that it is pretty thick....that being said the guitar still sounds great amplified and is surprisingly loud and resonant when played unplugged.

19

Is that a thinline Tele? I'm no expert on thinlines, but it seems to me maybe they use laminate wood for the "thin" side and a big chunk came off, like it took a hard, direct hit? Could be just the angle of that second pic, but it doesnt look like the exposed grain and the grain in the lighter part of the burst match up, thats why I mention that

20

Yes, that’s a ‘72 RI Thinline. There’s several pics and it’s in fact only the finish that came off.

21

That's interesting....my '06 Power Tenny, which fortunately doesn't have any damage appears to have what looks and feels like a relatively thin albeit poly finish that while still glossy has slightly dulled a bit over the years. It's about the best poly finish I have seen if your standard is being similar in look to nitro lacquer. Fender, even on their nitro finished guitars has a tendency to go heavy on the grain filler I guess for a smoother finish or whatever. My MIJ ESP/Edwards Les Paul copy has a nitro finish that appears to be very hard and relatively thin and is starting to really sink into the grain of the wood. The faded Sonic Blue finish (and clear finish on the neck) on my MIM Classic Player 60's Tele looks great and has none of the stickiness that poly finished Fenders are known for but my guess is that it is pretty thick....that being said the guitar still sounds great amplified and is surprisingly loud and resonant when played unplugged.

– Gretschadelphia

I meant FMIC is applying a thick finish on the new 2018 Gretsch guitars. I'm not sure when they started doing this. I have a 2011 Duo Jet that is spectacular.

22

I meant FMIC is applying a thick finish on the new 2018 Gretsch guitars. I'm not sure when they started doing this. I have a 2011 Duo Jet that is spectacular.

– BuddyHollywood

IMO, that would be a mistake on FMIC's part....if we're talking about the Terada made guitars then I would imagine that is how FMIC is having them spec'd or is it just something Terada is doing? I wonder how the finishes are on the nitro models coming out of Terada these days?

23

I have to say, I like the finish on my new 53 jet, its very nice, doesn't seem overly thick to me. My only issue is stupid; I want the black top to stay new looking but its just getting covered with these micro scratches you can really only see under light, I wonder if I can buff them out when I give it it's first polish...

24

I meant FMIC is applying a thick finish on the new 2018 Gretsch guitars.

Evidence?

I'm not aware of any ongoing finish issues with Terada-built guitars that would motivate FMIC to make any changes to Terada's methods.

Not that I know a fraction of what's going on...but you'd think you'd see discussion about any such issues, and I don't know of any.

25

From a pure "Financial" point of view, it made sense for Fender to do this, for longevity of their Instruments being sold to the public. Also, (and I'm no Chemist) I'm pretty sure that Polyurethane has improved since the late 60's to the point where it breathes better and doesn't have to be slathered on quite as heavily. In the 70's came Polyester, (same stuff clothes are made of), harder and thicker. First of course, (and still available for a price) there was Nitro, tough but doesn't age well. All three were used. Personally I prefer Nitrocellulose Lacquer, but for Mass produced Guitars, science has and did move on long ago. The Guitar in the picture would be simple to strip for paint.......just take a Heat Gun and a Putty knife and in 10 minutes you'd have a clean Body


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