Other Guitars

Mind: blown by HyVibe acoustic guitar at NAMM

26

um, Wow! That's a cool concept.

27

This idea has been around for decades.... Why not use an electric guitar as the platform? What advantage do you get having this idea inside an accustic guitar? Oh the acoustic sound!
Yet there are accustic guitar simulation effects?
From a playability standpoint an electric guitar makes more sense.
The only benifit I see is the “Wow” factor of “that sound is coming from an acoustic guitar?”

Not trying to be a jerk, just seems like it’s something for the player that has everything.

28

Why not use an electric guitar as the platform?

I don't know if you caught what's going on. There are no speakers involved. The actuators under the bridge are exciting the top of the guitar, using the wood membrane as a transducer for the effects. So the effects are coming off the same vibrating plane as the sound of the guitar itself.

An electric guitar wouldn't be resonant enough to reproduce the effects...er, effectively.

In principle, the idea has been around since physics started working the way it works in our neighborhood of the space-time continuum...so for 13 billion years or so. So why did it take till now for someone to think of using a guitar top as a speaker to produce something other than the sound of the guitar itself?

29

does this guitar have a "line in" input like for maybe adding some tracks of say bass, rhythm, maybe a little brushes on a snare, or maybe even a classy xylophone or strings? That way you could have the whole she-bang right there with ya!

Yes it does. They used an iPhone as a jam-along sound source during the demo.

30

Also, update from Matt: there will likely be three models, pricing projected to start around 1,000.00 and go to 1,500.00.

31

I’ll admit the technology is cool.

I’d be curious what it sounds like without a microphone 4 inches from the sound hole.

Interesting no one has asked typical guitar questions, ie. construction of the guitar itself.

32

I’d be curious what it sounds like without a microphone 4 inches from the sound hole.

Surely that's just picking up exactly what the guitar is doing, same as if it was an acoustic guitar without toptronic effects. But yeah, I don't think we can get the full effect without hearing it in person. Joe from Reverb sure looked more enthused after he heard and played it.

Most of the construction is visible through the clear plexi back.

33

I’m curious how they keep it from feeding back? Seems like that’s the real magic going on. You’ve got a transducer that molds the vibration on the top through a processor, than sends it out to the same top that is now a speaker.

34

I have not had a chance to read all of the posts in this thread, but I get the gist of it, certainly.

I saw this guitar a year or two ago at the NAMM Show along with a friend or two of mine. I believe that these gentlemen were exhibiting along the front wall of the basement, Proteus, if you recall that general location and the types of vendors who work those areas.

Generally speaking, I was not overly impressed by this product. Admittedly, I am somewhat old school in my thinking because I have almost invariably found that any device which tries to be a hybrid never seems to do either very well. The Taylor T-5 is a case in point in my opinion (no offense, Kevin).

Now, it is my recollection from having talked with these gentlemen about their product, and having listened to them demo it, that the effects which they have available are not ones which I find pleasing to my ears. When I listen to the chorus in this video, I find that it sounds more like a Leslie speaker than the lush effect that one gets from most chorus devices. Most likely, that effect can be moderated, but I do recall thinking that this seemed like a solution to a problem which I didn't have. I guess that you have to ask yourself how you will use these effects in your performances. Frankly, I don't find much need for a phaser in songs I am playing on an acoustic guitar. And, if it is a song that could be played on an electric guitar, then I will probably be playing it on an electric.

Another recollection that I have is that the guitar was not particularly loud. In other words, you couldn't use it as a standalone product in a performance. You would still need some kind of amplification to project the sound at a volume where people could hear you more than five to ten feet away.

These recollections are not fresh in my mind and I am having to dig back to remember everything. But, I do know that I left there not persuaded that this was a guitar that I had to have nor a technology that was going to be a game-changer for me.

I'll duck now.

35

Admittedly, I am somewhat old school in my thinking because I have almost invariably found that any device which tries to be a hybrid never seems to do either very well. The Taylor T-5 is a case in point in my opinion (no offense, Kevin).

And none taken. Generally, we share that opinion. However, in the case of the Taylors, I think that it's a matter of expectations vs the reality of what Bob has pulled out of his hat.

No, neither the T5 nor it's smaller sib will perfectly emulate a strat, tele, LP, Gretsch etc... Troo dat, and you will not hear otherwise from my lips, nor my laptop keys.

But- it does do a very credible emulation of a solid body (LP), a semi-hollow (335-style), will squawk reminiscent of a Fender and with the flick of a switch allow you to finger-pick "Blowing in the Wind", or "As Tears Go By" without sounding like at all like an electric, it really ain't all that bad. I think one reason it works is the multiple types of pickups in the T5's genetics. That, and as far as I know Taylor's the sole hybrid using electric strings instead of acoustic, although I could be wrong on that score.

I've played maybe a dozen hybrids at different price points over the last two decades, and the Taylor version has come closest to the mark by a fair margin. Godin's version always sounded like a plugged in acoustic, Epi's Multiac won't stray far from a generic Epi semi-hollow sound, while an Ovation sounded like, well- an Ovation. And don't even get me started on those Chinese-made ones in the basement at NAMM. Tried them in 2012. Nope.

Which is why I chose the Taylor. Now, here endeth the commercial.

36

I don’t recall EVER seeing Mr. Les Paul playing a flat-top acoustic guitar. But I do believe he’d have fun with this one however!

– kc_eddie_b

Agree 100%!!

I always enjoyed the mods he made on his personal guitars in his quest for new and different sound experiences.....

37

This is a fascinating thread and I have no intents to derail.

Under the heading of guitar sound mods, here is another of Les Paul's pieces. The silver thing protruding from the upper bout just north of the selector switch is a microphone arm. The control box below the Bigsby, I believe, is for the mic.

38

My biggest complaint about a multi purpose guitar is that it takes away the reason/excuse for buying multiple guitars.

39

I agree the effects don't do much for me but the looper and blue-tooth are cool.

40

This is a fascinating thread and I have no intents to derail.

Under the heading of guitar sound mods, here is another of Les Paul's pieces. The silver thing protruding from the upper bout just north of the selector switch is a microphone arm. The control box below the Bigsby, I believe, is for the mic.

– senojnad

Actually, that's the 'Paulverizer'...

41

This came out a couple of years ago. https://www.tonewoodamp.com

My sister bought me a contact speaker (transducer) a couple of Christmases ago. My plan is to try that on a cheap guitar.

42

I don't find much need for a phaser in songs I am playing on an acoustic guitar.

Then you can leave covering Waylon Jennings songs to the rest of us.

43

Yamaha has been on this road for the last couple years -- Link -- but, clearly, Lag has gone much further up that road...

44

There's a similar type of idea that's been out for a while, by a company named Tonewood Link it's not nearly as neat as this guitar though. It's mounted externally, and looks a bit dorky, however I believe that it uses a similar principle, albeit it uses the back of the guitar as the effect source.

EDIT : oops, I must have missed hammerhands post, he beat me to it by a week.

45

That's extremely nifty, and kind science-fiction-y, and clever, but man...does it ever sound cheesy!

46

Well, I don't think it sounds any cheesier than modulation effects used on acoustic guitar in the time-honored way. I liked the reverb OK, though.

Wonder if they can program up some compression. That would be odd - using the vibrating membrane on the instrument to compress that very membrane.

47

these french cats have STOLEN, S-T-O-L-E-N the https://www.tonewoodamp.com that has been out for several yrs. They just incorporated into a guitar.

..and yes it sounds like cheese w lots of curdles.

48

Well, I don't think it sounds any cheesier than modulation effects used on acoustic guitar in the time-honored way.

Exactly. Extremely cheesy!


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