Other Guitars

is anyone eaten up w/ Ovation?

51

The thin Ovations were no problem to play, standing or sitting. And for live use, the thin ones were THE ones. But I wanted mine to be a good ACOUSTIC guitar also. So I got the deep bowl. Those are a bit of a pain to play seated (due to the lap-sliding issue), and not fund to play standing up live because, as has been pointed out- that deep bowl was DEEP, and it really did put the strings out there, also the rounded back caused the guitar to "flip up", and the guitar top wasn't perpendicular to the ground- it was angled, which is not something flat back guitars do. Also a PITA.

But since I was in a "hair band", my Ovation was only used for 2 songs, and it stood by itself!

52

They never did a lot for me, for the reasons others have listed, although I did have one of their lower tier acoustic basses for a while, which was cool, but the pre-amp in it was almost useless.

A friend I used to play with had a lovely Ovation acoustic six string, and one night we were playing and his strap popped off and the guitar hit the floor... entire top separated from the "bowl" and the guitar lay in two distinct pieces once the dust settled. It was traumatic at the time, but a luthier glued the top back and if he didn't tell you, you would have never known.

53

and one night we were playing and his strap popped off and the guitar hit the floor... entire top separated from the "bowl" and the guitar lay in two distinct pieces once the dust settled.

Don't happen to have video, do you? That would be a hoot to watch. Ought to be a viral GIF.

It was traumatic at the time

Yes, I would think so!

54

I have nothing to add but I have enjoyed reading every post in this thread that I was intentionally avoiding for a few days.

55

My first real guitar was a nylon string Ovation and I still own it. Prior to that my sister and I had some cheap guitars from Tijuana our parents bought us during one of the family day trips to San Diego/Tijuana. I was in 7th Grade not knowing those were unplayable guitars. In 9th Grade I really wanted to play guitar and my mom bought me a used 1970s Ovation that I already mentioned. In the case it had an Ovation brochure that showed Jim Messina of Loggins and Messina because he was an Ovation player at some point in the 70s. Some point about the late 80s I foolishly wanted a steel string acoustic and put some 80/20 strings on and the tension was so great compared to the nylon strings it was made for so the bridge pulled off from the top. I was about 19/20 then and knew nothing. Brought to Los Angeles area luthier to the rock stars Karl Sandoval. He fixed it so well, not only has it held BUT you can't even tell that this trauma has happened to this guitar. I think he charged $125 to fix it.

Great guitar but it slides off me when playing sitting down.

By the way back in the 70s and 80s Ovation were hugely popular in Hawaii. These days I think Taylors and Takamines are popular there more than Ovation are. Remember flying back and forth to Honolulu and often Hawaiian touring musicians would carry on board their Ovations. Those Ovation cases are easy to spot. Now guitars can't be brought on planes.

56

I’ve never really bonded with them. I’ve had a few, and the bridge ripped off one. The rest were sold off in various periods. Play one next to a decent wooden dreadnaught and the differences really stand out.

57

I have had two Ovation guitars. The first one (I play on the picture) back in 1968 was a Classical model 1113 mislabeled as Josh White. My son now owns it and you can hear it on this https://soundcloud.com/yani.... The second was a Celebrity acoustic model with a mahogany top.

58

I have had two Ovation guitars. The first one (I play on the picture) back in 1968 was a Classical model 1113 mislabeled as Josh White. My son now owns it and you can hear it on this https://soundcloud.com/yani.... The second was a Celebrity acoustic model with a mahogany top.

– GG

Your son is a great singer!

59

Your son is a great singer!

– BuddyHollywood

Thanks. I will tell him.

60

I'm not interested in style supervision but I am going to express the opinion that myself and Glen Campbell didnt do anything different w an ovation that we did with any other guitar. Just strap up, stand and play like I said before. (Tavo)

Body shape (of the player) is more important than some might think. Campbell (and others) are likely tall (Glen was 6'0"), with long-ish arms and decently flat fronts, Me? 5'8", short legs, UN-flat front, and shortish arms that go with my shortish height.

Which was too bad, because I wanted to make it work...

61

To respond to Proteus, the nut width on both the Folklore and Country Artist are 1 7/8" & the fingerboard radius is relatively flat. Aside from subtle differences with the bridge, they're visually identical. They were made specifically for fingerstyle players.

The original Josh Logans didn't have a cutaway but the second gen like mine did, along with upgraded electronics.

What I like about these two models is their tone. They don't have that cheap sound like all the other Ovations with the none traditional multi-sound hole configurations.

62

The Applause that refuses to die.

Oh yeah, it finally developed a crack on the lower bout, it only adds Mojo..

63

The Applause that refuses to die.

Oh yeah, it finally developed a crack on the lower bout, it only adds Mojo..

– LA_Manny

I salute you sir! viva la raza

64

how you come to the conclusion that "Ovations are not entirely stable even when worn strapped while standing" I find very odd. Maybe if you suffer with vertigo they are unstable, or maybe if you grease yourself up with vasoline like burt renolds they possibly could be like boating a marlin..but for most its a simple operation.

by playing them. it's really quite simple: flatbacks stay put; bowl backs inherently slide around because there's no flat part that's in contact with your torso. when the back of the guitar and the tummy are both convex curves diametrically opposed, physics says that the smaller, curved area of limited contact can never be truly stable. if you've managed to adapt, congratulations, but the inherent problem still exists. otherwise the market would be flooded with people playing Ovation acoustics, especially now that a typical one goes for a sad $300-400 i.e. less than an Applause cost in the 70s adjusted for inflation. i wonder why there's so little demand for them that they're the only major brand in recent times who actually had to lower their prices.

65

even if you have washboard abs, the profile of your belly is still a convex curve.

66

I was working at the original Guitar Center when those were new. "They record great! Really clear" was their pitch for "not much bass, but you like that". One of the first guitars with a Peizo pickup though.

67

Cool DeArmonds on the electrics!

69

i agree a lot of their early popularity was due to the pickup, which was indeed among the first piezo pickups to become standard on acoustic guitar.

i just remembered that my older brother bought an Ovation acoustic back in the 70s. i wonder if he still has it, or the 12-fret Martin 12-string which was his baby.

70

The DeArmonds were used on the Thunderhead, which was top-of-the-line in Ovation's Electric Storm series. Tornados, Hurricane 12 strings and Eclipse models came with one of two different Schaller pickups. The Typhoon basses came with the four polepiece version of the Schallers.

71

Had a nice Ovation in the 90s ... probably 80s made.. and while it wouldn't be confused with my Westerly Guild or a nice Gibson Jumbo .. I liked it. It had a very ear-friendly sound as a rhythm guitar, especially on recordings.

It sat well in the mix and a had it's own nice voice. The neck was very good also, playable like an electric neck. Wish I still had it, actually.

72

all this discussion begs the question, have you played the more recent Ovation builds w the semi hollow shallow wood bowl backs? They sound fantastic in house sound and have really fat necks, none of that hard V stuff anymore. my Ynwie nylon is such a fantastic guitar and the white pearl glimmer top is subdued elegance.

listen to this thing

73

OK sounds good. Maybe I'll get one.

74

that could be interesting. i always thought that the plastic backs made them sound, well, plastic. too much reflectivity inside the body; Kaman tried to maximize reflection of sound waves from the top and the result seems to be this weird sort of phase cancellation, with the treble just slightly off from the bass and what sounds like more odd-harmonic content to both the electric and acoustic sound. so wood could be a good choice.

75

The backs are fiberglass, actually. They call the formula "Lyracord".


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