Other Guitars

Hoyer Special

1

This just arrived in the Mail. 1958/59 Hoyer Special. Somebody wanted this to be a rock and roll machine so they added a hofner vibrato and a hofner 2 pickup (fuma) floating rig that attaches at the fretboard the bridge and the side. All solid wood hand carved acoustic archtop. Needs a neck set (easier on these guitars), Some crack gluing and a fret dress for now and a refret soonish. Thismight very well be the coolest and best quality instrument I have ever owned. (Sorry Gretsch)

2

How it would've looked stock. I already have an original tailpiece and I might make one of those cool sharks tooth pickguards. Such innovative aesthetic design. 17 7/8" lower bout 24 3/4" scale length.

3

I love it, the older I get the more I appreciate the less usual instruments.

4

What Mr Tubs said. Beautiful guitar.

5

I concur. The fellow making these came form a traditional violin and luthier background yet was obviously not afraid to take dramatic chances on aesthetics. Bravo!

Of course a few hours after it arrived it looked like this!! Nice tan lines!

Next up list of funnies (DIY stuff) and a to do list with pictures. Older German guitars mostly don't use a dovetail joint. They have a tapered mortise like a violin.

Pickups measure a nice 4.8K I think meaning I'll probably like them, despite the tank-like mounting system

6

Man, that is cool! Congrats!

7

Nice.

I remember we had a discussion here years ago about a Van Morrison & Them live video. I think this is the one and my recollection (someone please correct me if I'm wrong) is that the consensus here was that the guitarist (I believe Billy Harrison) played a Hoyer. It's great to see one here in the flesh.

8

I love the styling of those German archtops!

9

The fellow making these came form a traditional violin and luthier background yet was obviously not afraid to take dramatic chances on aesthetics. Bravo!

That's an understatement! Exhibit 1:

I think I can rest my case.

Here's the one that always intrigues me, as it seems to have all the things I like to see in a guitar and I love the goofy shape.

I've had a few old '50s and early '60s Hofners, but never had the chance to even try a Hoyer, although I'm definitely an admirer of the brand.

10

The fellow making these came form a traditional violin and luthier background yet was obviously not afraid to take dramatic chances on aesthetics. Bravo!

That's an understatement! Exhibit 1:

I think I can rest my case.

Here's the one that always intrigues me, as it seems to have all the things I like to see in a guitar and I love the goofy shape.

I've had a few old '50s and early '60s Hofners, but never had the chance to even try a Hoyer, although I'm definitely an admirer of the brand.

– Afire

Yes and the Bianca too.

11

I like it. Bet it turns out to be a cool tool.

12

There were way more than a dozen German guitar makers/luthiers back in the 1960's and 1970's before the Japanese came in and destroyed the German guitar making industry. Practically across the board, the German guitar makers built guitars of exceedingly high quality -- very often way better than contemporaneous American made guitars. And the good news is that these guitars are priced way way below contemporaneous American made guitars on the used market. I own 14 German guitars from this era -- 9 Hofners, 2 Hopfs, a Huettl, and 2 Kliras and they are all heaven to play.

13

That is a seriously good looking guitar. Congrats

14

Thanks and well made too, which is a great combination. I'm taking care of many years of sitting unused and likely some enthusiastic usage prior to that.

-The neck is loose (really loose now!)

  • The headstock is split on one of the seams on the back and slightly cupped towards the faceplate with a crack at the top of the faceplate

  • back seam is open! rattle rattle! little interior diamond cleats on seam are loose or cracked

-thin maple side of neck pocket (cutaway side) is cracked in two small places but enough to allow it to move.

  • as above frets need some serious dressing, some ruts on the fretboard in the cowboy position but not bad.

Basically the usual neglected old solid wood acoustic sort of stuff.

Going for solid playability with some shining up etc.

I have now glued the neck pocket side an the headstock and I'm going to leave them in the clamps for a good 24 hours.

Tonight I hope to glue the back seam, lot's of clamps and padded cauls. (In the 2nd picture the grommets seemed like they might chip out the faceplate so I left them in and drilled the top cauls )

15

Hoyer -- a German contemporary of Hofner? Sorta like Gretsch and Guild ?

16

Hofner, Framus, Rogers, Hoyer, Hopf, Klira, Tellson, Huttl, Fasan, Lang (!) etc etc. There were many large and small German makers between the late 40s and early 70s. Most (while also producing cheaper plywood instruments) made some hand made high end instruments that were easily as good if not better than the best instruments produced in North America. As we know, success is often more about celebrity endorsements, timing and geographical location than it is about quality of build.

18

Thanks. I took the clamps off the headstock and polished up the neck some. This guitar had been rode hard and put away wet many times and it has obviously been leaned up against a lot of things.

The headstock looks good. Solid now and flat all the way down the back, only slight cupping closer to the nut on the headstock. Most of the faceplate is pretty well flat now, back seam is closed nicely. I still will probably pretty up the cracks in the faceplate. Still deciding.

I like the music store sticker and how Hoyer deliberately made the end of the fretboard go around the corner on the bass side and then have a sharp miter on the treble side. Cool! A subtle touch. (Excuse the sharpy on the frets I was marking where they were high to tap them back down.)

This sort of golden aged flame maple looks like candy to me

19

I'm a little late to this party... but wow. I really like that guitar! In all my travels I've never encountered one in the wild. Visually stimulating, but I am curious how you will describe it's tone (once you get it back together). Kudos for bringing it back to playing-shape. She's a looker!

20

Word is from someone who has 6 that they are very nice acoustics, archtop acoustics so they have that particular tone. I forgot the music store label. Some details and some funnies. -music store label

a few German 'kitchen luthiery' strap holders..including a NAIL!!. I like how the metal strap holders require 6 screws..SIX! each

better shot of the fretboard end detail with the pickguard/pickup mount.

a cool logo for those who want a hoyer tattoo

The original bridge and how the base (ebonized pearwood?) has the feet hollowed out. Also shows the screw hole that continued into the top!! Remember this is a handmade carved archtop guitar..like a Super 400 or a D'angelico. Those little roller sadles actually just roll back and forth . Kind of a cross between a bridge, an abacus and a childs' toy or pez dispenser..not sure what they were thinking. It will be put aside and proper bridge made of ebony, likely copying the common german 'teller' bridges.

21

I love it,including the aftermarket goodies. Quirky cool!

22

Enjoying this thread - a great new acquisition!

H59

23

How it would've looked stock. I already have an original tailpiece and I might make one of those cool sharks tooth pickguards. Such innovative aesthetic design. 17 7/8" lower bout 24 3/4" scale length.

– Toxophilite

I like those numbers. What’s the body depth on that baby?

24

With regard to the bridge, I know you'll want to make your own decisions, but here's a bit of related "trivia". A Hoyer bridge was good enough for one Kenneth Earl Burrell on the iconic L5 he was using in the early 60's (for me, maybe the pinnacle of archtop guitar tone): https://www.lespaulforum.co...

https://forum.gibson.com/ap...

25

Cool geet!

Isn't this what Randy Bachman is collecting nowadays,old German archtop guitars?


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