Other Guitars

Guitars You Like But No One Else Seems to Like

51

I don't own one, but I've always liked the original Peavey T60 guitars.

– hellbilly

I still have mine that I got around 1980, and I still dig it. The T40 bass is great too, even though it's a heavy sumbeeyotch.

52

Many of the candidates in this thread seem a stretch to me: to say nobody likes a particular guitar raises questions of context (ie, I'm pretty sure everybody likes Rics over at RicResource) and maybe geography - or era of musical interest. One way to gauge interest in any brand, past or present, is to see how much activity there is on a website dedicated to that brand. (A flawed metric for sure, since the GDP now struggles to reach 25 active topics a day - and an awful lot of people like Gretschs.) Another way is to see how the brand sells on Reverbay, and whether values have appreciated.

By those standards, my 70s-80s Matsumoku Electra/Westone dedication seems relatively lonely (I have 14, the dedicated website is all but moribund, and I'm still waiting for collector values to take off and fund my retirement), and my three-strong Wurlitzer (yes, guitar) hoard is out of all proportion to general interest in the brand. (But prices have gotten crazy in the last few years, so maybe word has gotten out. Hah!) There is a website, but it's been unchanged for decades.

I don't know what to make of my 60s Japanese Fujigen FV4 baritone (tuned standard). I've had two. My first electric, 1968-ish, was branded "Crestwood"; I loved it but let it go because I'd got the Wurlitzer, and who has two electric guitars? The second (branded "Kingston") I bought a couple of years ago to finally replace the first. They're the only two I've ever seen, and it's hard to find info about the model even among the Japanese 60s dudes. But does it count if there were never enough of them in the first place for "no one" to like?

Anyway, no one but no one evinces much affection for Jay Turser - but I bravely maintain that under its original ownership (see? I clearly know too much about the brand), numerous interesting and very well made guitars were offered, at silly low prices. Durned if I don't have four of those.

As I found when I sold my first one (because my second one played better), there's less than zero market interest in the Kona Artist A/E acoustic: I could have got as much from the hardshell case alone as I got with the guitar in it. But I still consider it a gorgeous instrument, and after a setup my second one plays like the proverbial dream. No point selling it for 100.00 when it handles and sounds like a far more expensive guitar. With its great looks, it's an ideal gig acoustic.

Then there are the Carlo Robellis. No website commemorates Sam Ash's long-time house brand, and we might conclude "no one" likes them. But those of us who have nice ones will stand up in their defense.


The discussion is interesting, though, when it turns to generally-unloved models by widely-adopted brands.

The 225 is an interesting Gibson choice - I agree that it's a completely wonderful spec. But it can't compare with the what's-wrong-with-me loneliness of models like the Sonex, the Corvus, Gibson's occasional attempts at Fenderism, and the 300 Firebird Xs a group of idiots at Gibson thought it would be cool to bulldoze.

Not to mention the Barney Kessel. Please don't mention the Barney Kessel. And DON'T SHOW ME ONE. It hurts my eyes. I'm afraid of it. I don't think even Barney liked it.

Among Gretschs, I concur that anything with a Florentine cutaway is a red-headed black sheep that most Gretschers look on with skepticism, if not disdain or ridicule. Y'all keep bragging about the 6120N, and I've seen'em - and I'm afraid to pick one up for fear the pointy cutaway will hurt me. I'll take you at your word that they're great guitars. Likewise Beasts and Committees and the hockey stick. They say Gretsch on them, but I can't believe the rest of the Gretsch family lets them get away with it. "That's the weird branch of the family. We only associate with them at reunions, and even then we try to stay away."

Fender has had plenty of little-loved orphans. Starcaster, anyone? Even the hallowed status of the Coronado clan seems suspect when its defenders doth protest too much, and everyone else stays away in droves. If you drive one of those, you're on the wrong side of the road. And what were those 80s Fender shapers? Performer? Anyone love those?

More recently, there's the short-lived Marauder, with its own unique offset body, a P90, and a TRIPLEbucker. I have one, and absolutely love it. Absolutely no one is plotting to steal it from me.


You know the one about the accordianist in a polka band who was driving home from a gig on the freeway in Minnesota, right? He was getting drowsy and pulled into a roadside rest offering free coffee. While at the welcome station filling up, he suddenly realized he'd left the back window of his Rambler station wagon down (trying to stay awake), and his accordian was in the back. He ran back to the car, and, sure enough, someone had thrown another damn accordian in there.

That's how you know when you really have an unloved instrument.

53

Many of the candidates in this thread seem a stretch to me: to say nobody likes a particular guitar raises questions of context (ie, I'm pretty sure everybody likes Rics over at RicResource) and maybe geography - or era of musical interest. One way to gauge interest in any brand, past or present, is to see how much activity there is on a website dedicated to that brand. (A flawed metric for sure, since the GDP now struggles to reach 25 active topics a day - and an awful lot of people like Gretschs.) Another way is to see how the brand sells on Reverbay, and whether values have appreciated.

By those standards, my 70s-80s Matsumoku Electra/Westone dedication seems relatively lonely (I have 14, the dedicated website is all but moribund, and I'm still waiting for collector values to take off and fund my retirement), and my three-strong Wurlitzer (yes, guitar) hoard is out of all proportion to general interest in the brand. (But prices have gotten crazy in the last few years, so maybe word has gotten out. Hah!) There is a website, but it's been unchanged for decades.

I don't know what to make of my 60s Japanese Fujigen FV4 baritone (tuned standard). I've had two. My first electric, 1968-ish, was branded "Crestwood"; I loved it but let it go because I'd got the Wurlitzer, and who has two electric guitars? The second (branded "Kingston") I bought a couple of years ago to finally replace the first. They're the only two I've ever seen, and it's hard to find info about the model even among the Japanese 60s dudes. But does it count if there were never enough of them in the first place for "no one" to like?

Anyway, no one but no one evinces much affection for Jay Turser - but I bravely maintain that under its original ownership (see? I clearly know too much about the brand), numerous interesting and very well made guitars were offered, at silly low prices. Durned if I don't have four of those.

As I found when I sold my first one (because my second one played better), there's less than zero market interest in the Kona Artist A/E acoustic: I could have got as much from the hardshell case alone as I got with the guitar in it. But I still consider it a gorgeous instrument, and after a setup my second one plays like the proverbial dream. No point selling it for 100.00 when it handles and sounds like a far more expensive guitar. With its great looks, it's an ideal gig acoustic.

Then there are the Carlo Robellis. No website commemorates Sam Ash's long-time house brand, and we might conclude "no one" likes them. But those of us who have nice ones will stand up in their defense.


The discussion is interesting, though, when it turns to generally-unloved models by widely-adopted brands.

The 225 is an interesting Gibson choice - I agree that it's a completely wonderful spec. But it can't compare with the what's-wrong-with-me loneliness of models like the Sonex, the Corvus, Gibson's occasional attempts at Fenderism, and the 300 Firebird Xs a group of idiots at Gibson thought it would be cool to bulldoze.

Not to mention the Barney Kessel. Please don't mention the Barney Kessel. And DON'T SHOW ME ONE. It hurts my eyes. I'm afraid of it. I don't think even Barney liked it.

Among Gretschs, I concur that anything with a Florentine cutaway is a red-headed black sheep that most Gretschers look on with skepticism, if not disdain or ridicule. Y'all keep bragging about the 6120N, and I've seen'em - and I'm afraid to pick one up for fear the pointy cutaway will hurt me. I'll take you at your word that they're great guitars. Likewise Beasts and Committees and the hockey stick. They say Gretsch on them, but I can't believe the rest of the Gretsch family lets them get away with it. "That's the weird branch of the family. We only associate with them at reunions, and even then we try to stay away."

Fender has had plenty of little-loved orphans. Starcaster, anyone? Even the hallowed status of the Coronado clan seems suspect when its defenders doth protest too much, and everyone else stays away in droves. If you drive one of those, you're on the wrong side of the road. And what were those 80s Fender shapers? Performer? Anyone love those?

More recently, there's the short-lived Marauder, with its own unique offset body, a P90, and a TRIPLEbucker. I have one, and absolutely love it. Absolutely no one is plotting to steal it from me.


You know the one about the accordianist in a polka band who was driving home from a gig on the freeway in Minnesota, right? He was getting drowsy and pulled into a roadside rest offering free coffee. While at the welcome station filling up, he suddenly realized he'd left the back window of his Rambler station wagon down (trying to stay awake), and his accordian was in the back. He ran back to the car, and, sure enough, someone had thrown another damn accordian in there.

That's how you know when you really have an unloved instrument.

– Proteus

hahaha!! Never heard that accordian joke before

54

Love my Westbury Custom! And it has a Gretsch connection. Designed by Dan Duffy. (not my photo)

– Bryan K.

I had one of those but without the Varitone and it came stock with DiMarzio Super II pickups in it. It was a great guitar. I sold it to a friend who still has it to this day and loves it! It pearl white, 2 volume and 2 tones and coil splits.

55

They'll send me to Coventry for being a Gretsch guy having a fling with THIS

57

Most people here would probably not have the love for my '67 Baldwin era Rally that i do, but my true guilty pleasure is my Sorrento. The pickupos sound like a Rockman on "stereo clean chorus"

58

Yamaha SGV 300

– Mr Tubs

I used to own one of these in CAR and loved everything about it, save the really narrow neck. I just couldn't play it. Pickups, wiring scheme and vibrato design are all excellent.

59

I agree with Tartan Phantom regarding Corvettes in comment #22. I bought one a few years ago basically to have an inexpensive Gretsch to take on planes. It doesn’t get much play time, however, every time I do play it, I find the tone to be very likable. Those Megatron pickups would be good in other Gretsches as well.

60

Here's my number one, a guitar from Eastwood/Airline. Everyone seems to love them guys! Well I'm happy, it has the neck I like, I can loosen the strings and undo four bolts and it's ready to take on the plane in five minutes. Price is good (used to be really good) and I've replaced the stock pups (meh) with GFS Surf 90s. Which also seem to be scorned by the cork sniffers. I'm itching to put another one together, maybe in red with a black pickguard for that Dracula vibe. Plus Supro of course reissued this model....and messed up the shape and proportion so badly, I couldn't believe it. It came out all kinda squat and squeezed up looking. And the wrote Bowie all over it, who knows!

61

Yamaha Revstar, particularly the 502T, or some of the higher ones with the matte finish and a couple glossy 'racing stripes' down the centre.

I think they look absolutely killer, every clip I've heard I think they sound great, but they must be pretty unpopular as I don't ever see them in any shops to try out.

62

An old Carvin was nominated as ugliest guitar of all time in another thread. I don't know if nobody likes them. I assume somebody does, because nobody seems to be giving them away. And I believe that the pickups have a good reputation. Anyways, I'm definitely smitten by the '50s SGB guitars. No idea how they feel or sound, but they're just too cool to not be good guitars.

63

Some of you are posting some very nice guitars, especially the Yamaha SGV series. I love those and when Guitar Center carried these and all for an affordable price I should have bought one. I messed up that. I don’t think the SGV counts as a guitar nobody wants. Many of the guitars posted probably don’t count either as no body wanting them.

64

I've read quite a few comments in the GDP over the years disparaging PRS guitars as "too perfect", "clinical", etc...

Well, I really enjoy my SE 24 Custom semi-hollow.

65

I've read quite a few comments in the GDP over the years disparaging PRS guitars as "too perfect", "clinical", etc...

Well, I really enjoy my SE 24 Custom semi-hollow.

– Steeple923

Right there with you

67

As far as guitars I own, when I play out with my Hallmarks, I get a mix of admiration and horror. Some folks, in the know, come up and want to check them out, but I live in an area where Strats, Teles and LP's rule the roost, so anything out of the ordinary gets funny looks usually.

68

Aluminum-neck Kramer.

69

Aluminum-neck Kramer.

– Proteus

Like the Travis Bean with the V-Headstock???

I DIG those!

70

That makes two of us.

71

That makes two of us.

– Proteus

Yep.

A friend had one of those, weighed a ton from what I remember, and definitely not fun to play when it was cold.

72

i found the Kramers hella ugly, but loves me some Travis Bean. the concept is actually quite popular nowadays with folks in the post-punk/doom/noise avant, with the most prominent and earliest adopter being Steve Albini; there are now several builders making new Bean-esque aluminum-neck-through-to-bridge guitars in the $2K-3.5K range, most notably Electrical Instruments Co. who no doubt stayed up all night thinking of a name. Buzzo from the Melvins plays a EI guitar.

73

Aluminum-neck Kramer.

– Proteus

I have a friend who owns an old Kramer bass with the aluminum neck. It is a fantastic player.

74

Macphisto

found the Kramers hella ugly

...but I don't think they're that bad. A slightly lumpy, undistinguished body shape perhaps, but functional. Balances well, and the natural finishes are visually forgiving when beat up over the years. The neck is completely stable over decades, the ebonol fingerboard impervious to wear; the frets may be stainless, as they seem equally so. The neck feels supernaturally consistent from end-to-end, as well as smooth and somehow grand-piano-like in its impassive stability. Tuning is also ridiculously stable once the guitar is acclimated to its environment. Overall, the guitar is, needless to say, reliable and durable. I have the single-coil 350, which is Grand Tele in its sonic aspect.

I will say the guitar doesn't suffer fools gladly. You have to play it cleanly and decisively.

I'm curious about the bass, yes. Everything about the design and pickups tell me it's a killer spec. Ought to sound fat, punchy, bright, articulate, with an extra edge of metallic precision (which could be dialed back). They do show up on Reverb in the 800.00 - 1,000.00 range. I have a harder time justifying basses to myself than guitars, and a Rick 4003 took precedence on my wishlist when I bassed up earlier this year. If the pressure for another bass builds to the breaking point, it will be the Kramer. (Though they say a guy should have a P-bass.)

75

I never thought i'd go for these ,but they play really nicely. Never bought one .....yet.

The original 90's Parker Fly Deluxe.


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