Other Guitars

Guild X-175 2020

1

Limited edition, I think I've got GAS again.

3

I was excited about Guild offering models with DeArmonds.

Their first two models aren't exactly what I was expecting.

I rarely, if ever, complain about pricing, but at $2100 MSRP, I really wish the Bigsby wasn't the licensed version, and the pickups weren't revamped DeArmond 2000s. Maybe they sound great. I don't know.

4

Did those modern world Franz makovers work out ok? The had gotten me curious

5

Did those modern world Franz makovers work out ok?

I've had only minutes of experience with the originals, but I have the reissues in my FMIC-era Aristocrat reissue, and really like the pickups. They're perfect for the guitar, and I haven't felt any dissatisfaction with their tone - or their response. (And poor response is usually what sends me looking for a better solution.)

They're all kinds of good things - bright, smoky, chewy, gritty, gnarling, and charming, alluring, and aggressive all at once when clean.

6

I think the new Franzes are good as long as you aren't comparing them directly to an original.

7

I've done the comparison with a new X175B from WMI in Korea, a 1959 C100DP and an 1960 T100DP.

Firstly, the 1959 and 1960 models, although quite close in tone, have different output levels as the 1960 is wound hotter than the 1959 guitar.

The Korean guitar is similar in tone but hotter again with the neck pickup wound hotter than the bridge one. This is kind of back to front from what we have all been led to expect but it does actually work well on the guitar.

All are in the same ballpark tonally. They just have mildly different flavors.

Walter Broes may join this thread as he's the "Guild guru" around here. If he does, I'll confirm one of his earlier posts that, whoever did the research on the Korean guitar, really got it right when compared to an original early sixties model. The headstock is different but I'd hazard a guess that is due to Cordoba, the licensor, not wishing to get into a legal dispute with Gibson as the orignal guitars were very close to the Gibson headstock design.

Oh, and the licensed Bigsby works as well as a US one. A bit like the Selmer licensed ones that ended up on Hofners 60 years ago!

8

Mike Lewis headed up that project for FMIC, and per his usual habit, took it to the mat. He's also the guy who headed up "vintagizing" the entire Gretsch lineup in 2003-04 after FMIC took the reins, and did a similarly meticulous, exhaustive, and "organic" job of it.

I don't know how to say it, exactly: one could slavishly replicate every detail of the specs of a classic guitar when building a reissue, and still miss the heart and soul. Also, in the case of guitars from the 50s and 60s - not an era of strict consistency in spec or build detail - which particular example do you robotically knock off? Mike's approach is to sample as many examples as he can get his hands on, play them and get to understand the individual guitars - then triangulate from those to an ideal version that captures the essence of the model. He has a knack for getting the heart and soul right from the start, and that understanding informs the decisions he makes when bringing an instrument back to life.

After he lovingly resurrected the Guild line (and I don't see that Cordoba has made any changes to Mike's work), he did the original Gretsch Roots Series project.

We all owe Mike.

10

I’ve come to really love the Franz pups in my 1962 Capri. Seems to be able to pull off all my moods.

11

I've done the comparison with a new X175B from WMI in Korea, a 1959 C100DP and an 1960 T100DP.

Firstly, the 1959 and 1960 models, although quite close in tone, have different output levels as the 1960 is wound hotter than the 1959 guitar.

The Korean guitar is similar in tone but hotter again with the neck pickup wound hotter than the bridge one. This is kind of back to front from what we have all been led to expect but it does actually work well on the guitar.

All are in the same ballpark tonally. They just have mildly different flavors.

Walter Broes may join this thread as he's the "Guild guru" around here. If he does, I'll confirm one of his earlier posts that, whoever did the research on the Korean guitar, really got it right when compared to an original early sixties model. The headstock is different but I'd hazard a guess that is due to Cordoba, the licensor, not wishing to get into a legal dispute with Gibson as the orignal guitars were very close to the Gibson headstock design.

Oh, and the licensed Bigsby works as well as a US one. A bit like the Selmer licensed ones that ended up on Hofners 60 years ago!

– Yavapai

Is WMI making them now? I thought they were still being made by SPG.

12

Oh good heavens! It'll probably be attractively priced, too. Gonna be a busy NAMM. Like they say on the CB radio: "Mercy sakes!"

13

Then there is the X-350 Stratford reissue but without the pushbuttons.

And maybe a Koa X-175?

14

I wonder how the switching will work on the Stratford. It looks like a standard 3 position toggle.

15

Mike Lewis headed up that project for FMIC, and per his usual habit, took it to the mat. He's also the guy who headed up "vintagizing" the entire Gretsch lineup in 2003-04 after FMIC took the reins, and did a similarly meticulous, exhaustive, and "organic" job of it.

And then someone had to go and un-vintagize them! Gretsch history is simply a recurring cycle of (re)introducing the mud switch and removing it again.

16

I wonder how the switching will work on the Stratford. It looks like a standard 3 position toggle.

– Dhdfoster

Press Release:

Oxnard, CA – Guild expands its Hollowbody offerings with a new take on the X-350 Stratford. First offered in 1954 as one of Guild’s top of the line models, the three pickups X-350 Stratford returns today as elegant as ever. Full hollow-body construction using an elegantly arched Spruce top and spruce tone bar bracing give the Stratford it’s iconic airy tonality, while the three Franz P90 single-coil pickups give this guitar a world of tonal possibilities from biting growls to airy chime. Intuitive controls make navigating the tonal pallet of three pickups a breeze, using a traditional three-way pickup selector for the Bridge and Neck pickup and a designated volume knob to blend the middle pickup into any configuration. Complimenting the variety of tones available from the X-350 is a Guild Vibrato Tailpiece for expressive playing. Other premium features include fully bound body, neck, F-holes, and headstock, mother of pearl block fretboard inlays, a hardshell case, and a beautiful Scarlet Red finish. X-350 Stratford in Scarlet Red $1,499 Street • $2,100 MSRP

17

Shame about the clown color on the 175 with DeArmonds, I love the idea of the guitar.

18

Shame about the clown color on the 175 with DeArmonds, I love the idea of the guitar.

– WB

I get that the blue may not be your cup of tea, but you never see a Blue X160 Rockabilly come up for sale. It’s almost always red. So whoever has them are holding on to them. I think this new Guild will sell.

You could always get one and paint it black.

19

I've actually seen mostly orange and blue X160's for sale used, but in any case, I don't like either. One of those DeArmond equipped 175's in natural or sunburst would be a no-brainer for me though.

20

I have a Newark St X175B and it's a really great guitar and was a steal used. One of the things that Mike Lewis did change when FMIC still had Guild was the placement of the bridge pu on the X175 to be further from the bridge than on vintage examples. Interestingly, Mike Lewis did the same thing with the Gretsch Electromatic 5120......and explained that it was done that way to "fatten up" the sound of the bridge pu and make more usable by itself.

21

A sunburst version would be very nice. Maybe they are leading with the flashy colors to get market attention with plans to offer more traditional colors later.

22

I have a Newark St X175B and it's a really great guitar and was a steal used. One of the things that Mike Lewis did change when FMIC still had Guild was the placement of the bridge pu on the X175 to be further from the bridge than on vintage examples. Interestingly, Mike Lewis did the same thing with the Gretsch Electromatic 5120......and explained that it was done that way to "fatten up" the sound of the bridge pu and make more usable by itself.

– Gretschadelphia

So, thank you Mike! My 5120 is still my favorite sounding guitar (mostly when played by the guitar player in my band) now that it is equipped with T’Armonds. The bridge pickup is both fat and cutting. When both pups are on, it’s big, bold and beautiful.

23

I've done the comparison with a new X175B from WMI in Korea, a 1959 C100DP and an 1960 T100DP.

Firstly, the 1959 and 1960 models, although quite close in tone, have different output levels as the 1960 is wound hotter than the 1959 guitar.

The Korean guitar is similar in tone but hotter again with the neck pickup wound hotter than the bridge one. This is kind of back to front from what we have all been led to expect but it does actually work well on the guitar.

All are in the same ballpark tonally. They just have mildly different flavors.

Walter Broes may join this thread as he's the "Guild guru" around here. If he does, I'll confirm one of his earlier posts that, whoever did the research on the Korean guitar, really got it right when compared to an original early sixties model. The headstock is different but I'd hazard a guess that is due to Cordoba, the licensor, not wishing to get into a legal dispute with Gibson as the orignal guitars were very close to the Gibson headstock design.

Oh, and the licensed Bigsby works as well as a US one. A bit like the Selmer licensed ones that ended up on Hofners 60 years ago!

– Yavapai

Except that the Selmer licensed Bigsbys from 60 years ago look virtually identical to a regular Bigsby appart from the "US" stamped on the front and being a fraction smaller in size.

24

A sunburst version would be very nice. Maybe they are leading with the flashy colors to get market attention with plans to offer more traditional colors later.

– Dhdfoster

I wouldn't bet on it. The guitar marketing geniuses still seem to think of those epi "flamekat" guitars as the epitome of Rockabilly cool, I believe.

25

I wouldn't bet on it. The guitar marketing geniuses still seem to think of those epi "flamekat" guitars as the epitome of Rockabilly cool, I believe.

– WB

The only one I've seen. . .


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