Other Guitars

Candy!

1

As in, kid in a store.

We had a nice series of threads 18 months or so ago, with guitars grouped under color themes. Not that anyone should care, but I find my guitar pics in the Candy thread are MIA, like apparently gone from the database.

As I recently bought a guitar - which was available in CAR - in another color, naturally I was thinking of Candy Apple. So I dragged out everything I have in that yummiest of all reds, and while playing through them (to see if there's any consistent red tone, and there doesn't seem to be), figured I'd try a fambly portrait. To be tedious, there are two new members since the previous thread.

Space is limited in the studioffice, and nowhere on the property (other than backing a car out of the garage into cold January rain) do I have enough floor space to array them in the nice circle I envisioned. This will do.

3

Two things are immediately apparent: white goes really well with CAR, playing the role of co-dependent in 6 of the 9 (and overwhelming red on one); and the 60s were apparently the heyday of the color, with five of the guitars based on 60s models. (One guitar is actually from that decade.)

4

Tim, I love CAR guitars. Especially love your Yamaha SGV, the one next to it and your Jazzmaster. All you need is a CAR Mosrite or Hallmark then you are set.

5

Someone always has to be the white sheep of the family. In this case it's the recent Electromatic 5422, which wears its candy apple all over its back and sides, but shows up wearing a sno-globe white sparkle top.

6

This has been one my favorite buys from last summer's Tele Madness, from Rondo Music's budget SX stable. Amazing fit/finish/QC, great chunky neck, jumbo frets, and the fat P90 snarl the build implies. ALL I've done is change the plain white pickguard for pearl. It's fully competitive with guitars at many times its 140.00 price! (Not crazy about the headstock, so I'm not showing it, but it has the full-deep body many budget Teles don't.) Highly recommended.

7

Great guitar here! Mid-00s "Q-Series" Crafted-in-Japan Jazzmaster. I changed the stock pickups out for AVRIs, but really couldn't tell the difference. Curt squirted the headstock body-color. I'd love to have a gold anodized guard on it, but it's hard to find one to fit the CIJ hole pattern. I keep .011 flatwounds on here. Seems to be all the JM I can imagine wantneeding.

8

Electra-Westone Spectrum X198, set neck, 1984. I think the blackout hardware suits it, and I love the red DR strings.

9

Surely familiar to everyone here, a 2018 5420. Gold and CAR are just killer together on this one. Only mod is a stainless Tru-Arc SerpenTune. I get special deals.

10

The Yamaha SGV-800 is, I think, a 90s or early 00s reissue of the classic 60s Samurai original. I traded Bonedaddy for it years ago. Tonally, it's actually in the Mosrite ballpark, though maybe not quite as hot. The tremolo is seriously overbuilt, and works well. Surf's up, huh?

11

The Yamha SGV trem is one of the best I ever tried. It rivals a Mosrite trem almost.

12

Lyrebird, Lyrebird. The lyrical, euphonious model name of this crazy Jay Turser from the early 00s always reminds me of the XTC song.

Turser apparently only hawked this one for a short time, and the flock must be tiny: the internet seems to have forgotten all about it. That's OK with me, I like having a rare bird. Ridiculous 27 fret neck (at least partially) on a small, light body make it easy to muscle around; the neck is an unusual combination of chunky on the back and flat across the fretboard, and is comfortable. The guitar balances beautifully; the ergonomics overall are exceptional. It came with a battery-powered distortion circuit which was beyond awful; that's been yanked, and the tiny-bucker at the neck now has a rotary progressive tap. Like the guitar itself, the trem is way better than it ought to be for the 112.00 I spent.

I don't know if this is a surf guitar...there's no liquid water on Mars.

13

So OK yeah. From the ridiculous to the equally ridiculous. Eastwood's recent knockoff of Teisco's late-60s Japanese fantasy-caster, yon Spectrum V. There were a lot of aesthetic obstacles to my buying this guitar: the distended, baroque shape; the German carve; the white edge binding; the 4&2 headstock with partial plastic overlay and unattractive Eastwood medallion; the cheesy faux-metal applique on the pickguard; and that Fisher-Price collection of colorful switches.

All it had going for it were the color - and the split-pickups which, Eastwood assured me, were wired just like the Japanese, in true stereo. (Meaning, to me - from my research - that the 3 treble strings from all pickups went to one output, and the bass strings went to the other.) Well no. Turns out that to Eastwood, it means that the identical signal - comprising all 6 poles of every pickup - goes to the two separate output jacks. Duh. Coulda done that with a Y-box. Worse, one of the knobs is just volume for the second output - so there's no tone control. Double-duh.

BUT. Danged if the guitar doesn't play like dream, with an infectiously springy, bouncy feel. (And I can't tell you what that means.) It also feels "unitary," like the whole guitar is hewn out of a single slab of something. Fretwork and setup were flawless (as were fit and finish), and the guitar sits to the body better than you might expect.

And it sounds fabulous. Stratty, of course, but maybe a little less focused, more spacious and textured - because of phase complexities compliments of the split pickups? The slew of ridiculous slide switches does let you get any pickup combination, and any pair out of phase. So, you know. It does a lot. so I kept it. (I could probably improve the cosmetics by ripping off the Spectrum nameplate and changing to monochrome slide switches. Aluminum would match the handsome knobs.)

AND - the case smells like fresh cookies.

14

Beautiful collection

15

The Yamaha SGV-800 is, I think, a 90s or early 00s reissue of the classic 60s Samurai original. I traded Bonedaddy for it years ago. Tonally, it's actually in the Mosrite ballpark, though maybe not quite as hot. The tremolo is seriously overbuilt, and works well. Surf's up, huh?

– Proteus

Kinda like a Mosrite on a few hits of LSD. Pretty cool. I like the weird ones.

16

Which leaves only the Mighty Wurlizter. This is the Wildcat model, circa 1966, made by the Holman-Woodell Company of Neodesha, KS - and distributed by Wurlitzer to take advantage of the decade's guitar boom. With the offset body, it looks surfy - but a swimming pool rout under the pickguard, nylon saddles in the bridge, the Wigsby (FABulously implemented), and the detailed single-coil pickups with sophisticated stereo wiring scheme were all the work of one Doyle Reading - a Chetly fingerpicker by conviction, who essentially built a guitar to sound like Nashville but look like Ventura Beach.

A different Wurlitzer model (a sunburst Cougar) was my first American-made electric, bought from a pawn shop in 1969 for 100.00. So chasing down this company's work was a long-running internet adventure for me; I've ended up with two Wildcats and the Cougar (a less offset design). Their third model was the Gemini, a star-shaped guitar which foreshadowed 80s shape guitars better than the Flying V or Explorer.

All have the same stereo wiring, whereby one pickup is routed to each pickup; both single coil pickups also have coil taps, to go from a middling SC tone to a thinner one. There's a rotary balance pot - and while the the tone control for the neck pickup rolls off highs as expected, the pot on the bridge pup rolls off lows. Wiring is all mil-spec, and there's a thin sheet of aluminum laminated to the back of the pickguard for shielding. Neck is thin and narrowish, with skinny vintage frets. Overall it's a much better guitar than I knew at the time.

The Wurlitzer venture lasted less than two years, though some of the principals thrashed around for a few more years with related products. I'm sure the Wurlitzer brand name did the marketing no good at all; under a different name and management, these might have been competitive guitars - and would probably have lost the stereo complication to get there. No doubt a busy intersection of business conditions was responsible for the wreck of the company - but it couldn't have helped that there was a problem with the finish process, and the paint jobs proved to be fragile. Paint chips seemed to fly off if you just touched the guitar, and the small factory (upstairs over a downtown store) was deluged with QC fallout. Other than that, the guitars are of consistently high quality, with premium components and solid builds. (I kinda know, because I've been through 7 or 8 of them.)

How the mighty have fallen.

17

All you need is a CAR Mosrite or Hallmark then you are set.

Well, yessir, I still need a Moseymark. But I'm drifting toward a different color! Maybe I have enough CAR.

18

The SX was the one that caught my eye followed by the Eadtwood!

19

The Yamaha SGV-800 is, I think, a 90s or early 00s reissue of the classic 60s Samurai original. I traded Bonedaddy for it years ago. Tonally, it's actually in the Mosrite ballpark, though maybe not quite as hot. The tremolo is seriously overbuilt, and works well. Surf's up, huh?

– Proteus

Oh yes indeed, I remember that one. The guitar you traded me, I gifted to a kid who needed a guitar and was in no place to get one. Pay it forward, as they say. Glad to see you still have the yammy.

20

I love the Yamaha and the Eastwood Teisco. And I love the metallic reds.

I'm told by my fiancee that I'm not allowed to buy guitars in the same color any more. She's fine with new guitars, they just can't be the same color as my other guitars.

Great deal - but I love metallic reds. lol

21

Great looking collection. I really like the Gretsch, but have to also say that my eyes are drawn to the Tele (and I am not a Tele guy). Don’t know whether it’s the lighting or what, but it just seems to have a nice patina.

22

I'm told by my fiancee that I'm not allowed to buy guitars in the same color any more.

Ah, I can fill in the rest of the story from her side - and it's a trick. (I learned this from my wife.) She SAYS you can get new guitars - but she only recognizes them by their colors, and she's worried that if you start doubling up, and she doesn't see them all out at the same time, she won't catch new ones when they come in. I've learned I can have pretty much any number of guitars of any color my wife already knows about.

It's when a new color comes in that I'm busted.


my eyes are drawn to the Tele (and I am not a Tele guy). Don’t know whether it’s the lighting or what, but it just seems to have a nice patina.

Naw, it's a fair picture, and for real. It's just a sweet guitar all the way around - though the pearloid guard was definitely a touch it needed. (Cream would have been OK too - but the original stark white was not.) The headstock, brand name, and logo don't bother me a bit when I'm playing it.

23

I'm digging all those CAR guitars, and it's a classic an beautiful finish. But... isn't THIS the white whale that you see at night when you close your eyes?!

24

Nice read Protty. And droolworthy candy.

25

Tim, I would think you’d need one of these.


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