Other Guitars

Best guitar for my son to start on.

1

I have a six year old son that is interested in learning the guitar and I was wondering what would be the best guitar for him to start on. He is a lefty but he has a toy guitar that I have seen him hold both ways. I have asked him what way is more comfortable but he wasn't sure. Any help I could get would be greatly appreciated.

3

How about a Gretsch Americana, 24" scale small bodied acoustic.

Link...

5

Baby strat is a good start.

I've got one available. In red.

7

Or if youre into vintage gear, a nice Mustang or Duosonic. Those are short scale too , you can find em cheap, and they retain resale value if your son might loose interest after a while ...

8

Right handed. Both hands have plenty to learn/do, and the player who plays right handed has the world of guitars available to him. And a baby Strat sounds good. They don't make a baby Tele?

P

11

I would go for 1/2 or 3/4 size acoustic nylon string.

Link...

12

baby strat, epi also makes a baby flying vee 8-)

13

Country Club?... White Falcon :P

If you want to start on Electric, a mini strat would be cool.

Or acoustic a mini Taylor/Martin sized guitar. Im sure there is cheaper brands out there. Or parlour or 000 sized guitar.

14

and a tweed pignose!!! 8-)8-)

15

I should expand on my post. The guitalele is small and easy to manage like a ukelele, but has six strings and is tuned the same way a guitar is if you put a capo on the fifth fret. This means you can learn (on a higher register) and then when your hands get bigger, transfer all that to a guitar.

You can also tune E to E if you get stiffer strings.

And they're less than a hundred bucks.

16

i want a guitalele!!!

17

Play right handed. I'm a lefty too. There's a number of guitar legends that are left-handers that play right. Like has already been said, both hands are equally important not to mention the fact it will be easier to learn from other right-hand players. Besides, there's more right hand guitars available to choose from than left.

18

Hello Crusty...

I went through this just last spring with my son (although he is right handed).

I went with this exact 3/4 size tele clone from Rondo Music.

http://www.rondomusic.com/f...

Now hindsight being 20/20, I would have gone with a strat clone rather than the tele as the tele is a little heavier I think. You will need at least .10's for it to stay in tune I have found.

I also bought a children's book on how to play. It is very basic... teaching chords on 4 strings first and the concept of strumming (all downstrokes at this point), rests (full, half and quarter) and notes (full, half and quarter and how that applies to each measure and ties in with the rests). It also has very basic children's songs (Brother John, 3 Blind Mice) and gives direction to the instructor as to what to do with playing along.

I found that putting a capo on the 4th or 5th fret helped immensely with his arm reach.

As for the comments on directing him to play left or right handed? This was a hotly discussed topic a few years ago. My feeling is to let him go to what is natural.

Hope all this is helpful.

19

Hmm, that's easy, I've got two right-handers for sale...email me!

...wisdom

20

Hello Crusty...

I went through this just last spring with my son (although he is right handed).

I went with this exact 3/4 size tele clone from Rondo Music.

http://www.rondomusic.com/f...

Now hindsight being 20/20, I would have gone with a strat clone rather than the tele as the tele is a little heavier I think. You will need at least .10's for it to stay in tune I have found.

I also bought a children's book on how to play. It is very basic... teaching chords on 4 strings first and the concept of strumming (all downstrokes at this point), rests (full, half and quarter) and notes (full, half and quarter and how that applies to each measure and ties in with the rests). It also has very basic children's songs (Brother John, 3 Blind Mice) and gives direction to the instructor as to what to do with playing along.

I found that putting a capo on the 4th or 5th fret helped immensely with his arm reach.

As for the comments on directing him to play left or right handed? This was a hotly discussed topic a few years ago. My feeling is to let him go to what is natural.

Hope all this is helpful.

– spartanman

Hello Crusty...

I went through this just last spring with my son (although he is right handed).

I went with this exact 3/4 size tele clone from Rondo Music.

http://www.rondomusic.com/f...

Now hindsight being 20/20, I would have gone with a strat clone rather than the tele as the tele is a little heavier I think. You will need at least .10's for it to stay in tune I have found.

I also bought a children's book on how to play. It is very basic... teaching chords on 4 strings first and the concept of strumming (all downstrokes at this point), rests (full, half and quarter) and notes (full, half and quarter and how that applies to each measure and ties in with the rests). It also has very basic children's songs (Brother John, 3 Blind Mice) and gives direction to the instructor as to what to do with playing along.

I found that putting a capo on the 4th or 5th fret helped immensely with his arm reach.

As for the comments on directing him to play left or right handed? This was a hotly discussed topic a few years ago. My feeling is to let him go to what is natural.

Hope all this is helpful.

– Spartanman

I agree with Spartanman 100%. Rondo is the way to go.

21

I'm not convinced (yet) that electric guitar is the best first guitar for 6 years old child.

22

Acoustic first. And you really have to think small if you're serious about this. Six is quite young, and the patience of a child is slim.

I say acoustic because I think it's important to get the physical connection to the instrument, feel the vibrations, you know what I mean.

23

I get a lot of parents asking what's best for a kid to start on. Personally I think electric is absolutely the way to go. The body size, and action are my main arguments for electric, if it's easier to play they're more likely to do well and stick with it. The other main reason is the kid can sit and play unplugged and not drive everyone in the house nuts, but plug in when they start getting somewhere. There's also a big cool factor for any kid with an electric, whereas a nylon, or even steel string acoustic may not have the same appeal.

I think there are a lot of kids that stop playing because of cheap acoustics with bad action, or from playing nylon string guitars (which are a whole different instrument to me) that to me, are much harder to play.

Pappy wrote a good blog making a great case for a 5120 as a first guitar. Maybe a little much for a 6 year old, but it's worth a read.

24

I agree with Deed on this. Acoustic first.

25

1/4 size fractionalized guitars. Rare but kid sized. I got my first guitar because I wouldn't leave my fathers beloved old Epiphone alone.They're smaller than a Baritone uke


Register Sign in to join the conversation