Other Guitars

12 String Electrics. Yay or Nay?

26

My unison twelvesby (no octave courses) with Pete Biltoft pickups has a great range of tones and thus applications. And it has a functioning bigsby!

27

I've had a bunch (Ric, Fender Elec XII, Dano, Guild Starfire, etc) and the one I currently play is a recent Hagstrom Viking. It has a really nice neck profile, wide but thin. The pickups are rather generic sounding, but they can be changed.

28

I have 3 12's. One acoustic/elec, One solid tele body and a doubleneck.

29

While this one is a one-off Schecter prototype, they do make a similar Ultra-12. I love this guitar's playability and tones which include coil-tapping.

31

Here is my September 1993 Rickenbacker 360/12V64.

I am not sure why there is the ambivalence about acquiring an electric 12-string. Yes, they can be a one-trick pony, if that is how you want to use it. On the other hand, you can play it on more than a Beatles/Byrds/REM/Tom Petty song and add a great sound to the song.

Think of it this way -- have you ever owned an acoustic 12-string? If so, how did you use it? You very likely used it to play rhythm guitar because its full sound tends to thicken up the backing over which the vocals or lead guitar lies. Why couldn't you use the electric 12-string in the same manner?

When I used to play in a classic rock cover band, I played it on more than just the obvious 12-string songs and it fattened up the band's overall sound.

32

Mine is a Sanatoga JT Hawk 12. The body is light --- not sure if it's solid alder or perhaps chambered --- which makes it a little neck-heavy, but otherwise it's comfortable to play. The neck is a little wider than most, and the tone is very Ric-ish.

It does everything I need a 12-string electric to do, but the Gretsch 5422-12 is also very tempting, as is the Epiphone Elitist Riviera 12 string. If I should stumble across a good deal on either, I'd be hard-pressed to say no.

33

If you like an offset body style, try a Revelation RJT60/12: very nicely made, low action, two decent Entwistle P90s and plenty of tonal variation with that chicken head five-position rotary switch. And a snip at about £270 (UK). There's a six-string too.

34

I've been playing my 1989 Rickenbacker 360/12V64 for nearly 30 years ,i keep it on hand and play it daily,it's rarely in the case .

I love the sound of an electric 12 ,i would seriously love to get a blonde Gretsch 12 someday.

35

If your back is in shape, you can always go doubleneck (a twofer special!). My Epi G1275.

36

Yay.

Enjoying my Rickenbacker 336-12 since 1986. Missing my Vox Starstream XII.

37

Dig my righteous Rick 650/12 one of three in the universe... w/ killer maple board and big frets. Still going to sell it cause i have an even more outrageous project coming in a while. Out of our 24 song, 2 set show, I use ot for 8 songs, so a full 1/3rd.

38

Should have never sold my Danelectro Cherry Burst semi-hollow 12 last year (in a moment of stupidity...)

On the lookout for another one already..

39

My first inclination was to title this thread "Show Your 12'er!". Seems it morphed into exactly that. I see Dave K put up a Revelation, a guitar sold on Amazon which is a curious brand and Dlaf_2 with a Schecter. The Schecter TS/H-12 is another guitar that seems to get some positive reviews. Of course the Danos always come up. Hmm. Food for thought.

40

I'm on the Yay side, too. I've had one Rickenbacker 12 or another since 1992, starting with a 330-12, then getting a 360-12V64 in 1998.

Some years back, one of my bandmates encouraged me to use it all the time so as to give our band a distinctive sound (no other bar band in our market had an electric 12-string). I declined. Didn't want to be a one-trick pony riding another one-trick pony.

Mine looks just like Ric12string's, except it's backwards.

If Gretsch were to make a left-handed electric 12-string, I would have no qualms about letting the Rickenbacker go to acquire one, if need be.

Paul/FF909

41

Oh yeah!

I made my latest 12 out of one of those Astro Jet bodies and Curt painted it, but I've had about a dozen in my life and we've had 4 or 5 different ones in the house in the past two years.

42

^That Gretsch6213, not me. ^

43

Being a teenager in the mid-60s, I grew up loving the 12 string sounds of the Beatles, the Byrds, the Beau Brummels, The Searchers, the Hollies, the Turtles, etc. I just learned of a group from that era that did not have nearly the success that they should have. I assume that they took their name from Chimes of Freedom, a Dylan song from the first Byrds album: Starry Eyed and Laughing. I gather that they are an English group and may have had some success over there. I prided myself on knowing obscure groups but never heard of these. Can someone tell me something about them?

44

What I've seen in this thread that piqued my interest:

  • A reminder of the Fender XII, a much more intriguing proposition than a Strat 12, and surely ripe for reissue in the Squier line, a la the Bass VI
  • The reminder of the Coronado 12, an object of my adolescent catalog-browsing lust
  • The Dano 12 - bound to be a sweetheart
  • The revelation of the Revelation line. A 12-string JM, why not - when it's so affordable?

Can't help you on the obscure Brit group, Don, but your mention of 60s obscurities reminds me that "Little Black Egg" came up in travel conversation earlier today and, it being the future we live in, I was immediately able to cue up a re-master by The Nightcrawlers on Amazon Music and stream it through the car audio system.

It's a record I hadn't heard for decades, and you talk about time travel! I was immediately transported. Anyway, despite the fact that I have every word and every lick of every instrument memorized in my musical DNA (it was a perfect song for a youthful garage band of neophytes to tackle), it hadn't struck me before that the immortally simple guitar hook is apparently done on a 12-string - or two guitars slightly out of tune. Were my old vinyl 45 and "record player" really so lo-fi that I couldn't hear that before?

Or did someone get cute with enhancements during the remaster?

45

If the neck isn't at least 1 3/4" wide I'm out. So thank to late great Tom Petty for telling Rick if they wanted an endorsement model with his name it had to have a wider neck.

46

What I've seen in this thread that piqued my interest:

  • A reminder of the Fender XII, a much more intriguing proposition than a Strat 12, and surely ripe for reissue in the Squier line, a la the Bass VI
  • The reminder of the Coronado 12, an object of my adolescent catalog-browsing lust
  • The Dano 12 - bound to be a sweetheart
  • The revelation of the Revelation line. A 12-string JM, why not - when it's so affordable?

Can't help you on the obscure Brit group, Don, but your mention of 60s obscurities reminds me that "Little Black Egg" came up in travel conversation earlier today and, it being the future we live in, I was immediately able to cue up a re-master by The Nightcrawlers on Amazon Music and stream it through the car audio system.

It's a record I hadn't heard for decades, and you talk about time travel! I was immediately transported. Anyway, despite the fact that I have every word and every lick of every instrument memorized in my musical DNA (it was a perfect song for a youthful garage band of neophytes to tackle), it hadn't struck me before that the immortally simple guitar hook is apparently done on a 12-string - or two guitars slightly out of tune. Were my old vinyl 45 and "record player" really so lo-fi that I couldn't hear that before?

Or did someone get cute with enhancements during the remaster?

– Proteus

"Little black egg with the little white specks ..."

Heard this at about every high school dance in '66-68. Something in the back of my mind says Vox Phantom 12 but that may just be from a group that I saw play it.

47

Whenever I do a cover band thing I always try to get Little Black Egg in the set. Such a great song ! Simple with a great hooky riff.

48

Spent part of yesterday looking at 12 string electrics. Watched some demos, cover songs, etc. I suppose I reasoned with myself it's a sound none of my other guitars can replicate. But there's that nagging question, is a 12 string a one trick pony therefore not get much play?

– razzer10_4

I don't think they're one trick ponies. It all depends on the guitarist, his/her imagination, creativity, and ingenuity. The thing to do, IMHO is to listen to as many 12 string pickers of all stripes as you can. And keep in mind it's just another guitar.

It seems, much to my gratification and delight that my band looks for more material that we can use my April '09 Rick 360/12 on.

49

Being a teenager in the mid-60s, I grew up loving the 12 string sounds of the Beatles, the Byrds, the Beau Brummels, The Searchers, the Hollies, the Turtles, etc. I just learned of a group from that era that did not have nearly the success that they should have. I assume that they took their name from Chimes of Freedom, a Dylan song from the first Byrds album: Starry Eyed and Laughing. I gather that they are an English group and may have had some success over there. I prided myself on knowing obscure groups but never heard of these. Can someone tell me something about them?

– Don Birchett

Yes, they were from London. Active about 1974-6, I believe. Tony Poole played a Rickenbacker 330/12. They did indeed take their name from a line in the Dylan song "Chimes of Freedom."

Topping the Byrds was a tough act, but I much prefer this version to the Byrds' version. Poole's flat picked arpeggios are ever so much cleaner than McGuinn's. Which is surprising to me, because McGuinn was usually a very precise 12 string player.

SE&L's first two LPs have been reissued on CD http://www.starryeyedandlau... It's worth getting.

I think they came on the scene 8 or 9 years too late for folk-rock and were about the same for the jangle-pop sounds of the 80s. Great band, good harmony singing, and oh that 12 string Rickenbacker!

I believe Tony Poole is still active and last I heard may still be playing with Ross McGeeney.


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