Other Equipment

NKD!

1

OK. Here's the story. I've been looking for quite some time for a keyboard on which to learn and for recording. I am into 60's garage rock and love the sounds from Vox Continentals, Farfisas, and other analog type keyboards. I know the Continental has been reissued by Korg, but costs $2200, and any kind of Hammond is also $2-5K. Farfisas are cheap, but you can't find a used one that works (well) or is overpriced. I also didn't want to spend lots of dough on an expensive synth with added sim. software.

A few weeks ago I was perusing Reverb and came across the Yamaha Reface YC. Dang if this wasn't exactly for what I was looking; and on sale for only $350 at Sam Ash. I watched about 10 videos, read a bunch of reviews, and then jumped on it. It has settings for Hammond, Vox Continental, Farfisa, Acetone, and Yamaha organs. It has drawbars, rotary speaker simulator, vibrato/chorus, distortion, and reverb.

Wow! The first thing I've been practicing is 96 Tears by ? and the Mysterians. It only took me a couple minutes to dial in a very close approximation of that organ sound - still have to get more learning on the drawbars. Next will probably be Good Lovin' by the Young Rascals.

2

Thus far at least w/ the Hammond clones, I haven't been impressed by the C1 C2 C3 chorus settings... but they keep getting better.

3

Cool tool!

I've sold my Rhodes, Wurlitzer, Hammond, and Korg T3 sampler/player - all in favor of softynths (and soft-everythingelses), mostly in iOS, using a Novation 5-octave controller.

And I still have a 6-octave Nord Electro 3 for all those electromechanical sounds - but honestly, the iOS versions are killer.

Yamaha has released a whole series of dedicated retro-revisit keyboards like yours, and they get rave reviews. Great approach, everything built in with actual drawbars, knobs, and switches.

Have fun!

4

I'm mainly a keyboard player. Guitar came second. I checked out that little Yamaha keyboard. For the money, it's a great basic keyboard. Lots of features, highly adaptable. I'd loved something like that in '64. Had a Farfisa (the calliope from Hell) and a Wurly 140B EP. Still have the 140B. For your uses and needs, that Yamaha is a near perfect solution---at a great price as well. What amp are you using, or are you going directly into the board? Have fun!

5

I'm mainly a keyboard player. Guitar came second. I checked out that little Yamaha keyboard. For the money, it's a great basic keyboard. Lots of features, highly adaptable. I'd loved something like that in '64. Had a Farfisa (the calliope from Hell) and a Wurly 140B EP. Still have the 140B. For your uses and needs, that Yamaha is a near perfect solution---at a great price as well. What amp are you using, or are you going directly into the board? Have fun!

– wabash slim

For recording, I'll go direct. At band practice, I just went straight into the PA (no keyboard amp yet since I'm just beginning my keyboard learnin'.) Suggestions for an inexpensive but rugged amp would be appreciated.

6

For recording, I'll go direct. At band practice, I just went straight into the PA (no keyboard amp yet since I'm just beginning my keyboard learnin'.) Suggestions for an inexpensive but rugged amp would be appreciated.

– Steeple923

Due to the wide range of a keyboard, a powered monitor (or two for stereo) is the best solution I've come across. Guitar amps don't have the bottom end, bass amps lack the highs. The rotary effect works best in stereo. A small powered PA head would do nicely, so going direct to the board is fine. I use a small 10 channel mixer into a pair of Mackie TH-15 powered monitors. The best part is that my rig is much lighter in weight than the Super Beatle and Dual Showman amps that I used in the '60s, and it sounds far better.


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