Other Equipment

More Bridges.

1

First just let me state for the record that I'm not in the bridge business, so no competition with Proteus or anyone else. I guess you could say that mine are the, "horse and buggy" of bridges. A while back I started carving wooden bridges for archtop guitars, mostly because I needed one and because I was curious about the tonal aspects of bridges made from different types of wood. So far, Brazilian rosewood and ebony bridges have emerged. The ebony one is on my old 1960 6124. The one pictured here is for a friend who wanted one for his old Gibson L5, compensated for a wound 3rd string. http://roypatterson.com/in-...

BTW, until I find a suitable alternative to Photochucket, I'll be linking back to my website where I have control, and ownership of images; hence the above "Link".

3

Do you find that a full contact saddle/base transfers sound better than the traditional "two-leg" variety?

5

Elegant style for archtops, lovely.

6

Do you find that a full contact saddle/base transfers sound better than the traditional "two-leg" variety?

– lx

Well, I'm no expert, but from my experience so far, and this extends to wood densities etc. as well, I can say that there is a relationship between a guitar and its bridge that is symbiotic, if I can borrow that term. A bridge that works well on one guitar might not be the best for another. For example, my Gretsch 6124 is a fairly "light" guitar; lively, with a quick response and not much bass response. The Brazilian rosewood and ebony bridges with full contact bases sound better than the one it arrived with; an Indian rosewood bridge with feet. The extra contact from the full base and slightly more mass and density in the woods evened the response out, provided a little more sustain and produced slightly more bass response. However, when I tried one made from the very dense African blackwood, the guitar lost sustain and was less responsive. The African blackwood on my friend's big old Gibson L5 however, really brought the guitar to life with better sustain and a more even respose.

I think the same can be said about metal bridges; mass and density are variables. My 6118T, made at the Fuji-gen factory is very close to a vintage (Brooklyn era) guitar with a very light build. The Tru Arc was very good, but I felt that it was a bit too dense for that guitar, preventing it from responding the way I wanted it to. So, I asked my luthier friend to build a brass bridge with less mass and the guitar livened up with a little more response. On my Terada built 6120DS however, which is a heavier build, the Tru Arc really improved the responsiveness of the instrument.

So, based on my experience so far, there is no one best bridge design; it really depends on the instrument.

8

Absolutely beautiful, Roy!! Exceptional visual quality; a very classy design!

9

Cool! I especially like the stepped base. I make my own bridges for all my archtops, Mind tend to be a one piece design (no risers) with a compensated bone saddle.Usually out of ebony. I just started work on a classic Synchromatic design out of Brazillian rosewood, It'll have the adjustable risers but wick have a bone saddle unlike the originals, A bit better for the regular bigsby action. I'll get a picture up when my #^%# camera batteries recharge.

10

Cool! I especially like the stepped base. I make my own bridges for all my archtops, Mind tend to be a one piece design (no risers) with a compensated bone saddle.Usually out of ebony. I just started work on a classic Synchromatic design out of Brazilian rosewood, It'll have the adjustable risers but wick have a bone saddle unlike the originals, A bit better for the regular bigsby action. Here's the base with the main dimension roughed out and the top 98% fitted to the top. I'll do the other stepped end dimensions once the bridge is shaped perfectly to the guitar's top

11

Cool! I especially like the stepped base. I make my own bridges for all my archtops, Mind tend to be a one piece design (no risers) with a compensated bone saddle.Usually out of ebony. I just started work on a classic Synchromatic design out of Brazilian rosewood, It'll have the adjustable risers but wick have a bone saddle unlike the originals, A bit better for the regular bigsby action. Here's the base with the main dimension roughed out and the top 98% fitted to the top. I'll do the other stepped end dimensions once the bridge is shaped perfectly to the guitar's top

– Toxophilite

Very nice Bernie, and thanks for the compliments on the design guys.

Brazilian rosewood is amazing stuff; not as even a response as ebony, but to me it's like Pino Noir; something subtle but special nonetheless. Maybe I'll try one with a bone saddle sometime. My next one will be of Macassar ebony, along with a matching riser for a Lollar Goldfoil that will be going on the old 6124.


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