Other Equipment

homerecording

2

If you had an interface that provided provided phantom power, I'd recommend a Rode NT1A condenser microphone. The price is slightly higher than your budget ($229), but could be acquired for less if you found a 15% off sale somewhere (Musicians Friend?). The microphone is very low noise and sounds great for the money both on vocals and instruments. The resale value would be decent if you decided to upgrade later on. My opinion is that USB microphones will not hold their value as well and will be harder to sell as compared to microphones that have XLR connections.

I found a Rode NT1A microphone/interface bundle that seems to be a reasonable value, but it is considerably higher than your budget. I hope that you find something that suits your needs. Good luck with your search

https://www.sweetwater.com/...

3

Get the best mike you can afford. As my mixer has an USB output, I don't need an USB mike, which most are designed for podcasting. XLR mikes are far more desirable and are far more useful. As you are doing fingerpicking, look for a large diaphragm type. Beatbyrd 's recommendation for a RODE is a good one.

4

I have both USB and XLR (with a Roland UA-25) mikes for recording. I use whatever is more suitable for the session. USB mikes are convenient but you have to make sure they meet your requirements. For instance, if you want to overdub, the mike should provide basic monitoring facilities, such as headphone output with level control and mixing facility. You may also want to record in stereo. For recording acoustic guitar, most of the time I use an MXL USB.007 (stereo). For overdub, I use an AT2020USB+ or a Blue Yeti. The Yeti is very versatile (multi-pattern), but is both bulky and heavy, which make placement difficult.

5

If you had an interface that provided provided phantom power, I'd recommend a Rode NT1A condenser microphone. The price is slightly higher than your budget ($229), but could be acquired for less if you found a 15% off sale somewhere (Musicians Friend?). The microphone is very low noise and sounds great for the money both on vocals and instruments. The resale value would be decent if you decided to upgrade later on. My opinion is that USB microphones will not hold their value as well and will be harder to sell as compared to microphones that have XLR connections.

I found a Rode NT1A microphone/interface bundle that seems to be a reasonable value, but it is considerably higher than your budget. I hope that you find something that suits your needs. Good luck with your search

https://www.sweetwater.com/...

– beatbyrd

Beatbyrd - thanks for this info.

I'm deciding between a simple USB mic vs. interface + XLR mic.

Do you use the Rode mic for vocals? This bundle does seem like a good value. Only issue is I wish there were two mic/instrument inputs.

6

Apex makes a decent series of condensors for quite reasonable prices Their 360 tube mic beat out a U87 in a blind test. Knockoffs of AKGS and Neumans and remarkably nice sounding.

7

Beatbyrd - thanks for this info.

I'm deciding between a simple USB mic vs. interface + XLR mic.

Do you use the Rode mic for vocals? This bundle does seem like a good value. Only issue is I wish there were two mic/instrument inputs.

– sleepy

I use the Rode NT1A for vocals and acoustic guitar. I understand your desire for 2 inputs, but I was trying to keep you as close to budget as possible. The interface can always be upgraded at a later date, if you decide that you really need 2 inputs.

Most serious home recordists would agree that there is always something that can be upgraded. Once hooked, it never stops.

8

That's a good point - thanks.

9

Like a lot of other hobbies/avocations/addictions----once you start, you just can't stop. It does add versatility, and can give you many other unexpected uses that you hadn't planned on. I got a smallish mixer as my keyboards weren't happy with guitar amps and preferred using their XLR outputs. It has a USB output as well as standard 1/4" phone and XLR outs. Add in a pair of Mackie powered monitors and I've got a smallish PA. I've been working with sound gear since the '60s, so it was just a natural choice for me.


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