Other Equipment

Gretsch reissue melita, any fans?

1

I know this will sound crazy, but after many bridge swaps, including tru arc and a stovebolt embiematic, I rolled the dice and got the stock gretsch reissue synchrosonic on reverb.com, and I love it! I'm not trying to be contrary, but I really do like the delrin saddles and even the thumbscrews, about 20 mins of playing and I naturally adjusted to it, no issues palm muting. No acoustic loss of volume either. Anyone else here like the stock gretsch synchrosonic? I know it gets thrashed a lot, but properly set up its a keeper for me!

2

I will add that I play a silver jet, and that the plastic feet were not even close to fitting the top of the body, I probably sanded about an 1/8" off each foot before it was acceptable, then a little more fine tuning, so it wasn't just "plug and play," so to speak

3

IIRC what I've read here in the past, these seem to be the Gretsch bridge of choice for X's -- and our very own -- Billy Zoom.

4

I had the same experience with my last Jet. And I've had Melita equipped guitars for years before this, so perhaps should have known better. I started with the Melita, got distracted by all the talk of amazing improvements with this or that bridge, tried several, including premium boutique bridges, and wound up right back where I started, having found that nothing was an improvement over the Melita, plastic saddles and base and all.

5

I agree. I surprised myself by liking it way more than the Embie version, this sounds full bodied and piano-like, whereas I did experience the volume loss with the Embiematic, and it was a little bright for me. I see no need to replace the saddles either. I'm using a 10.5-.52 string set fwiw

6

I like them on certain guitars. I have one on my 6130 Knotty Pine, and strung with flatwound 12's, it gives me a great plunky country sound, great for chicken pickin' with the Dynasonics!

I wouldn't use it on every Gretsch I have, but the Melita/Synchrosonic does have a character of its own, and is definitely another variation on the "Great Gretsch Sound." Plus, the thumbscrews never really bothered me-- they're easy to work around for palm muting once you get the hang of it.

7

I just could not bond with mine, but I did find a good use for it:

With the original thumbscrews, it makes a great cheese grater.

8

Plus, the thumbscrews never really bothered me-- they're easy to work around for palm muting once you get the hang of it.

A agree with this too. I always suggest the flat screws for the wary, but the thumb screws really don't prevent palm muting at all. Them being there just feels different at first.

9

I can't think of one reason to keep those silly big thumbscrews. I've come to like what a Melita can do, but those thumbscrews have to GO!

10

I like them on certain guitars. I have one on my 6130 Knotty Pine, and strung with flatwound 12's, it gives me a great plunky country sound, great for chicken pickin' with the Dynasonics!

I wouldn't use it on every Gretsch I have, but the Melita/Synchrosonic does have a character of its own, and is definitely another variation on the "Great Gretsch Sound." Plus, the thumbscrews never really bothered me-- they're easy to work around for palm muting once you get the hang of it.

– Tartan Phantom

I feel similar to Tartan Phantom regarding these reissue Melita Syncro-sonic bridge. One came on my Duo Jet and I used it for a while. It's a really good bridge and it does create a percussive, warm and pleasing "plunky country sound". For me I realized I wanted to get more jangle, kerrang, twang, whatever you want to call it from my Jet. After a few different bridge experiments including trying the Melita again I now have an aluminum Tru-Arc Serpentune on there. To me the Serpentune is the best bridge made for a Gretsch guitar.

One of the beauties of having a floating bridge is it's really easy to experiment.

11

IMO it's like with the pickups.Every Guitar is calling for the right PU and even so with the bridge.But it depends on, what kinda sound you're looking for.I tried a copper TA on my 2 tone grey CC, but it was to planky.Switched back to the melita on it and got that old Rockabilly sound on it.I don't like much too bright guitars.On the blue 5127 the TA sounds reaaallly good.I have 4 Guitars with Melita and they're sounding great on them.For better comfort, I sanded down the thumbscrews at work and polished the heads.

13

I tend to adapt to whatever bridge happens to be on the guitar when it comes into my possession. As I'm somewhat of a vintage Gretsch 'purist'...well, a vintage 'anything' purist....I like to keep the original equipment on my guitars. So my '55 Jet has a 1950's Melita bridge (the original Melita base was broken when I bought the guitar so I briefly replaced it with a reissue and it was totally fine until I found a complete 1950s original). Likewise my '55 Streamliner has it's original Melita bridge and I love it. The thumb screws don't bother me at all and I've sorta got used to the 5th and 6th string thumbscrew sized indentation on the inside of my wrist where I rest on the bridge.

I never really notice too much of a practical playability issue switching from my Melita equipped guitars to say the Tru-Arc on my Duane Eddy 6120 or the Compensated Bigsby bridge on my '55 6120. Of course there's a tangible tone difference spread across these bridges but I can't say that I prefer one over the other. I like 'em all.

So to the OP's initial question...yes, I'm a fan of the Melita, reissue and vintage.

14

I can't think of one reason to keep those silly big thumbscrews. I've come to like what a Melita can do, but those thumbscrews have to GO!

– WB

You can adjust them without a screwdriver. Okay, not a great reason, but it is one reason.

I would suspect that was the logic in the first place, since the earlier ones already had the flat screws.

15

I found that while setting it up, it helped to locate the whole bridge where the saddles are more or less centered on the bridge body, more tuning stability and better sound. I initially had it closer to the pickup but the saddles slid back pretty far, and it didn't sound as good with all that uneven tension pulling it back


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