Other Equipment

Gibson / Maestro Vibrola. Anyone here like em?

1

I know a lot of ppl hate em based on folklore alone(same as many ppl hate bigsbys) but was thinking of putting one on an es125. Not enough angle for a bigsby . They look great... was hoping someone here may have real experience with one. Here's one on a Gibson es..

2

I had an early ES-125 I put a Bisby on - it worked well. If the 125 has the floating bridge then a B6 should work. I have seen later 125s with the 330 style bridge and then yeah - you would need the roller tension Bigsby for that, and they're just not the same.

As far as the Maestro goes, I dunno. They look cool though!

3

thanks Jimmy. yeah i think its 65 , essentially a single cutaway 330. super light , comfy and great sound. but didn't realise it would not be B6 compatible when i first bought it. Maybe i should sell and look for an earlier one or a 225

4

I'm curious about why it won't work. Is it a floating bridge or later fixed bridge?

5

I had one on a Kalamazoo and loved it! The "spring" broke around the screws though. Cracked and screw wouldn't hold. I was quite young at the time and was probably trying to do a Van Galen dive -bomb on the poor thing. Wish I had it now.

6

thanks hilosean. was it okay for bigsby type wobble?

hi Charlie. it's the later fixed bridge . like this

7

I wonder if the neck angle is different on the later ones. I think the fixed bridge started in '68...about the same time as the long neck 330.

9

I had an early ES-125 I put a Bisby on - it worked well. If the 125 has the floating bridge then a B6 should work. I have seen later 125s with the 330 style bridge and then yeah - you would need the roller tension Bigsby for that, and they're just not the same.

As far as the Maestro goes, I dunno. They look cool though!

– JimmyR

I have found that B7 Bigsbys (with the roller/tension bar) work MUCH better if you replace the stock spring with a Reverend "Soft Touch" spring. BIIIGGG difference!

10

I had a 1962 Les Paul that had one. Had no problems with it except for when changing strings. Be sure to change them one at a time.

11

The Maestro Vibrolas are OK. I almost bought a '63 ES335 that had one, shortly after I graduated from college in 1987 (the guitar's price was fantastically low, but the guitar shop just wouldn't give me more trade-in value for the guitar I owned at the time, so I couldn't call it a done deal), and I've played a few other Gibsons with Maestro Vibrolas over the years. They stay in tune pretty well IMO, but just don't do dive bombs with them, or they will break in short order - they're like a bent over piece of spring steel.

12

If anyone has one for sale for a reasonable price contact me!

13

I loved the old ones, but the spring steel they use in the new ones is not of the same quality and feels too spongy for my liking. YMMV.

14

A buddy has one on his Melody Maker. Works fine, but seems odd if you're used to a Bigsby or Floyd.

15

I loved the old ones, but the spring steel they use in the new ones is not of the same quality and feels too spongy for my liking. YMMV.

– Bear

That's disappointing. They aint cheap and I reckon the older metal would fatigue.

Are they okay with heavy strings? The ES feels super loose with 11 flats

16

Can't speak about an es125, but fwiw I have an Epi SG Maestro. It's ok but the arm is a bit to long and high. I prefer a Bigsby.

17

Wonder if you can get a shorter arm... Looks like the ES in the top pic has a shorter arm but could be an illusion as the ES body is much larger

18

Actually, in comparing photos, the arm on my SG reaches up to near the middle of the neck pickup but is by the bridge pickups in the es photos. Maybe problem solved with the larger models.

19

Wonder if you can get a shorter arm... Looks like the ES in the top pic has a shorter arm but could be an illusion as the ES body is much larger

– eCastro

I had a 1962 Les Paul Special (SG style) which was the same vibrato but with a different arm. The arm was flat like a bigsby. I drilled an extra hole to shorten it.

20

I had a 1962 Les Paul Special (SG style) which was the same vibrato but with a different arm. The arm was flat like a bigsby. I drilled an extra hole to shorten it.

– Pt

This is a different model but has the same vibrato.

21

I like em and have one on my Epiphone Firebird. They do give the guitar that big pants look though

22

I like a big pants look but they are pricey items

23

This is a different model but has the same vibrato.

– Pt

That arm adjustment is a nice option.

24

They work fine for a little shimmer. If you've ever played a Rickenbacker with an Ac'cent vibrato, it's pretty much the same thing. But why not a B7? They were designed for guitars like this. Not wanting to drill holes in the top?

25

Hmmm... If it's a '65 it probably has the skinny (side-to-side) neck. I had a '65 335 once - in fact it was the first 335 I ever owned. It had a neck which was ridiculously narrow but very thick. In other words the fingerboard was too narrow for my big hands and the neck so thick from front to back it felt very much like a baseball bat. It was a shame because it sounded beautiful.

The ES-125/225 style is one of my all-time faves. My 225 is pretty much the perfect guitar for me. The sounds are all there - the fat, squawky bridge pickup which will still twang if you lower the gain, and the fat, smokey neck pickup which is pure Gibson joy. And the in-between setting which is perfect for Stray Cat Strut... I've had this 225 for nearly two years now and the love has not diminished at all. And it sounds so good I still don't feel the need for a Bigsby yet!


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