Other Equipment

dBridges: the better bar bridge

51

I use the Gibson ABR-1 without the wire and buzzing/rattling hasn't been an issue on any guitar I have used the bridge on. I think they sound better than the Gotoh too.

Sometimes I have played guitars with the Gotoh and the strings have "sitared" in the slots a little, but that's owing to poor setup, not the bridge. You can't just rely on the factory slotting; it needs to be finished with a file.

52

Thanks for all the nice compliments for my pickin' (wink)

It's DAVE! I'm just a Rock n Roller...

I've also experienced less material is best bet on a bridge besides light weight (the ebano bridgde is about 10 grams). My excitement is mainly about the perfect intonation and this "new" material.

A one piece bridge generates a more transparent tone and increases sustain, this is pure physics. But no one needs 100% perfection when it comes to guitar tone. It's the sum of all aspects that creates a lively sweet sound, even disadvantages (think of a standard Telecaster bridge!) are part of the whole!

But intonation should be as good as it gets. Guitars are poor intonating enough (due to their construction) so a bridge should intonate as perfect as possible.

53

Tuna-matic! Ha ha I laughed out loud at 1:08 in the morning. Wouldn't it have been easier to post the "review" here?

54

"Guitars are poor intonating enough (due to their construction)"

Please explain this.

55

Not that easy for me to explain in english, basically:

Only a tonic keynote and it's octaves are perfectly in tune, all other notes are a little bit out of tune. It's the construction of a fretted instrument.

Quoted from mandolincafe.com:

Default Why fretted instruments can never be in perfect tune in all keys Maybe someone already has posted on this. Someone recently commented that the second fretted B note on the A string often sounds sharp.

The reason for this is because in a "PERFECT CHORD" for example, in order to have the overtones (secondary sound waves--imagine a wave hitting the side of a tub and making smaller waves along with the big wave although that's not really an accurate metaphor) -- for the overtones to sound "PERFECT" on a G scale, the C note should be vibrating at 1.33333333.... times the frequency of the lower G note, and the D note should be vibrating at 1.50000... times the frequency of that G note.

You could set up a piano that way, and you could set up the frets on a stringed instrument that way. However, it would only be in tune IN THAT KEY. In order for the A note to be in tune with that D note for the key of D, that A note would have to be vibrating at 1.5 times the frequency of the D note. The same would go for the E note in relation to the A, the B in relation to the E, and all the way around seven frets at a time until we get to a G note, which would NOT be in tune with the original G note. (I'm leaving out all the other notes of the scale which would similarly be "off" all along the way.) And then putting it in tune for the key of C, well, the G note in the key of C would have a different frequency than the G note in the key of D.

To compromise, musician/mathematicians figured out that the two notes that sounded best together have double the frequency and so decided to give them the same letter. C and C' (or an octave higher). What kind of scale can go up an equal number of "vibrations" to get to the doubled frequency? Well, they took the TWELFTH ROOT of two -- in other words, a number, multiplied by the ROOT "C" (for example) which would create the next note C# and then multiplying by the same number, the next note "D", etc. until, after twelve times, it becomes the doubled "higher octave" C.

They picked that because five frets (half steps) up, the vibration is 1.3348 times the root note, which is pretty close to 1.333, and seven frets up, the vibration is 1.4983 times the root note, which is very close to 1.500.

However, the other notes on that scale do not EXACTLY, PERFECTLY create the mathematically perfect, "sweet" overtones. In particular, the second half step is 1.122 instead of 1.125 (a little flat, often not a big deal) but the fourth half-step is about 1.256 instead of 1.250 (a bit sharp enough to hear). On a mandolin, to sharpen up the A string so that it doesn't sound that teeny bit flat means that when fretted at the second fret, (to be the fourth half-step in the G scale) -- well, that B note is going to be even a little sharper. And if you change keys, the whole thing becomes a big mess! So "perfect tempered scale" in one key would be a big mess if you change keys.

(This problem is also compounded by the thickness of the strings, but that is another issue dealing with "compensation" etc.)

The "EQUAL" tempered scale is the best "compromise" to be able to play in different keys even though each note will not create the perfect overtone, the main notes are pretty close. On a fretless instrument, one can ever so slightly adjust the string length. On a fretted instrument, a combination of set up (because poor set up can exaggerate this mathematical problem) and also technique (slight bending to sharpen a flat note, etc.) can make it sound pretty good.

Below is a chart I copied from (gasp!) Wikipedia -- or you can just go there and read about "EQUAL Tempered" scales on stringed instruments.

Name Exact value in 12-TET Decimal value in 12-TET Cents Just intonation interval Cents in just intonation Error Unison (C) 1.000000 0 = 1.000000 0.00 0 Minor second (C♯/D♭) 1.059463 100 = 1.066667 111.73 −11.73 Major second (D) 1.122462 200 = 1.125000 203.91 −3.91 Minor third (D♯/E♭) 1.189207 300 = 1.200000 315.64 −15.64 Major third (E) 1.259921 400 = 1.250000 386.31 +13.69 Perfect fourth (F) 1.334840 500 = 1.333333 498.04 +1.96 Augmented fourth (F♯/G♭) 1.414214 600 = 1.400000 582.51 +17.49 Perfect fifth (G) 1.498307 700 = 1.500000 701.96 −1.96 Minor sixth (G♯/A♭) 1.587401 800 = 1.600000 813.69 −13.69 Major sixth (A) 1.681793 900 = 1.666667 884.36 +15.64 Minor seventh (A♯/B♭) 1.781797 1000 = 1.750000 968.83 +31.17 Major seventh (B) 1.887749 1100 = 1.875000 1088.27 +11.73 Octave (C) 2.000000 1200 = 2.000000 1200.00 0

https://www.mandolincafe.co...

56

Your ear might hear 2 cents, next you're going to tell me a piano intonates better.

It's not the construction that causes the problem it's the way a guitar is played and how it's set up.

57

All instruments have the ability to play out of tune and it's the slight imperfections that make it interesting.

You can thank The Rolling Stones for making my point audible.

58

Nice line of bridges. As noted, the block styling motif has a hint of Johnny Melita which lets the eye accept it on a traditional-type instrument. It's purposeful, functional and easily identifiable at several paces away. Can't ask anything more from a cohesive design.

Best wishes for success in this enterprise.

59

"Guitars are poor intonating enough (due to their construction)"

Please explain this.

– Curt Wilson

You've asked, I answered. It's obsolete to discuss the little imperfections that keeps the tone rockin, I've said the same before. But that has nothing to do with a good intonation (Keith Richards may disagree here).

60

You did you quoted, thanks for that.

Unless someone, Henry J perhaps, builds a computerized bridge there won't be any advances with set saddle bridges regarding intonation. I'm hoping the noise factor has been eliminated with this bridge which would be a huge selling point. Once the string is intonated and compensated, temper tuned, then the rest is a moot conversation.

61

"Noise factor"?

62

I was wondering that as well. Don't all solid bar bridges eliminate any noise factor? (Assuming by "noise factor" you mean rattling and creaking of parts).

63

I was wondering that as well. Don't all solid bar bridges eliminate any noise factor? (Assuming by "noise factor" you mean rattling and creaking of parts).

– Dave B

...or sitar tones and dying notes from bad slotted string posts ;)

64

My mistake, I thought you could adjust the saddles to achieve perfect intonation.

65

My mistake, I thought you could adjust the saddles to achieve perfect intonation.

– Curt Wilson

The idea is this - you put a TOM on your guitar and adjust it for perfect intonation. Send me a photo of that TOM. I bake the saddle positions into a CAD design specifically for your guitar. The final machined, solid bridge you receive has exactly the same saddle positions as your TOM.

67

A Bridge Too Far

– Zigracer

Bridge Over Troubled Water

68

Stefan is a good guy - no issue with him at all. However - he has a little bit of a chip on his shoulder about Compton for sure(and possibly Tru-Arc as well)and therefore his aggressive sales style is likely at least partially motivated by those emotions. ;)

Doesn't mean the bridge he's touting isn't cool or anything. It just means most of us that love and use great US built aftermarket bridges by industry standard leaders Tru-Arc and Compton will likely continue to support them for many many years(decades)to come.

I think there's room for everyone of course, and as stated before......the market dictates what is amazing or not. Not promo or hype. I know that as well as anyone. ;)

69

The idea is this - you put a TOM on your guitar and adjust it for perfect intonation. Send me a photo of that TOM. I bake the saddle positions into a CAD design specifically for your guitar. The final machined, solid bridge you receive has exactly the same saddle positions as your TOM.

– Dave B

This doesn't sound like hype to me. This sounds awesome.

70

Guys, I really appreciate all the feedback, but it's probably best if I refrain from commenting any further on my bridge design (other than to perhaps offer corrections to factual errors). I'm going to focus on actually releasing the product.

Please note this is Stefan's thread, and his views are his own. Other than sending him two prototype bridges for evaluation (in return for his honest feedback) he and I have absolutely no ongoing arrangements. I did not pressure him to post anything here or anywhere else, he's not under any sort of non-disclosure agreement and is most welcome to speak his mind without any influence from me.

72

Stefan is a good guy - no issue with him at all. However - he has a little bit of a chip on his shoulder about Compton for sure(and possibly Tru-Arc as well)and therefore his aggressive sales style is likely at least partially motivated by those emotions. ;)

Doesn't mean the bridge he's touting isn't cool or anything. It just means most of us that love and use great US built aftermarket bridges by industry standard leaders Tru-Arc and Compton will likely continue to support them for many many years(decades)to come.

I think there's room for everyone of course, and as stated before......the market dictates what is amazing or not. Not promo or hype. I know that as well as anyone. ;)

– TSims1

Tony Sims! You must've crossed quite a few bridges to find yourself way over here on THIS forum!

73

Tony Sims! You must've crossed quite a few bridges to find yourself way over here on THIS forum!

– Lacking Talent

Lol. I lurk. I lurk.

;)

74

So what are the bridge materials and prices?

– BuddyHollywood

I'd be interested too when they become available. Let us know when you set up a website with all of the info. Thanks!

75

The aluminum version is also pure awesomeness...


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