Other Equipment

Danelectro necks - 67

1

Anyone had a chance to play a Danelectro 67? I'm wondering how the neck profile compares, say, to a duo-jet.

I can't do baseball bat necks and the Jet necks are super slim. My Robin probably is as close as my Jets but the body style is crazy, wondering how the 67 stacks up.

2

It was pointed out on another forum cough-offsetguitars-cough that there are two different versions. An earlier metallic smooth version and a newer block-ier verson. I'm interested in either.

3

I was trying to compare necks/radius(eses) and danelectro has a pretty wide radius (13+?) so I think I'm going to have to hit the Arlington show and try out some guitars.

I've got a Gibson SG 61 RI that I need to cut loose but I can't imagine getting rid of it for a RI Danelectro - unless it "speaks to me". lol

4

I have a Dead on '67 Baritone, if that counts. But, I am not quite sure that I could characterize the neck vis-a-vis a Duo Jet's neck. If I get a chance tomorrow night, I will try to pull each of them out and see if I can articulate the difference(s) between the two's necks.

First, however, confirm for me that this is the line of guitar (the Dano Dead on '67 series) that you are referring to.

6

Vintage Dano necks are downright skinny with a very flat radius, something like 16" or flatter.

All the modern Dano's I've played and/or owned had necks that had a little more meat on them than the vintage ones and a slightly rounder fretboard radius, but they're still far from a "fat" neck, more on the thin to medium side.

7

As far as I'm concerned, that's freaking awesome, they're pretty scarce around here so I can't try them out. My wide radius guitars-that-shall-not-be-named are easier for me to play (oddly enough) so I'm interested in other brands that aren't as ahem pointy. lol

8

I picked up a Danelectro black sparkle DC model pretty cheap today (korean)- totally random find while I was out trying Jazzmasters and they're so rare here and the price was so good I figured it would be a good beater. This thing plays GREAT, screams when you dig in and I love the flat radius and the neck. I plugged it in and started fooling around with it and it just felt "natural" which is the best feeling when you pick up a guitar. I didn't have to fight it at all.

Both the guys in the store told me (separately), "I'm glad you're buying it so that it didn't follow me home". I hadn't planned on a DC since i like the 67 offset look better, but it plays so well I did OK.

In the two stores i went to today there were a lot of Gretsches, I guess they've been releasing a lot of models, i guess I haven't been paying much attention, played a streamliner with weird knobs that was "ok", there was an electromatic with a cool "V" stop tailpiece. I didn't take down any of the pro-line versions since I'm not looking for another Gretsch right now.

9

Cool you found one you're happy with! Everyone should have at least one Dano.

10

Like Walter says, vintage Dano necks are slim. I have an early '60s Convertible and it's as thin as anything else I've ever come across.

11

My original '55 SilverJet had a neck fatter than any baseball bat. I don't see how you can compare a hollow core door with strings to a Gretsch Jet though. They made great basses, but the guitars aren't real.

12

Hollow core door! Thanks for the laugh, BZ. Still, a lot of people learned to play on Danos.

13

I should have been clearer, my RI jet necks are slim.

Sounds pretty freakin' good for a hollow core door - maybe more guitar manufacturers should use more household items.

14

They made great basses, but the guitars aren't real.

This is funny, but perhaps not entirely accurate.

Every Dano or Silvertone I've seen extends into three directional dimensions, has mass, feels as solid to the touch as other guitars (or objects, for that matter), has weight and occupies space. I guess I can't prove all the ones I've only seen pictures of are real - they could be virtual constructs created in computer programs - but I trust most have been.

It's also possible that our shared common reality (to the extent that it is a shared, common reality - though on the GDP we seem to confirm that at least for our purposes by recognizing common externalities and using mutually understood language to discuss them) is "actually" a virtual construct in a vast alien computer simulation, but within that context - the only one available to us (unless you've broken on through to the other side) - I accept Danos as being as real as anything else.

Are they good guitars? My mid-60s Silvertone amp-in-caser certainly is. It's humble and plain, I guess, but it sounds great and every time I get it out of its case, it's in as good a shape and as functional as when I last put it in. 'Nother words, it's been both stable and durable since I bought it second-hand from a guy named Schrödinger.

It's true that I can't prove its condition when in the case - or even that it's actually there when the case is closed. It's possible that it only becomes real when I open the case, and that it reconstitutes itself in its last observed condition only when I see it.

But so far as I can tell, that's true about the rest of reality as well.

So, nope, Billy. Danos pass the reality test for me.

15

Even though it doesn't get played as often as I might otherwise like, I do like my Dead On '67 Baritone. Its pickups have a great tone that I am not sure I would find elsewhere. John Sebastian sure seemed to like it when he played it.

16

They made great basses, but the guitars aren't real.

Jimmy might disagree. I've seen him play "Kashmir" and "In My Time of Dying" on this guitar.

17

I could be wrong, but I'm not sure Billy recognizes Jimmy Page as having credentials to testify in the court of reality, CV.

18

Their basses sound like guitars. Very twangy and bright

19

Their basses sound like guitars. Very twangy and bright

20

They made great basses, but the guitars aren't real.

This is funny, but perhaps not entirely accurate.

Every Dano or Silvertone I've seen extends into three directional dimensions, has mass, feels as solid to the touch as other guitars (or objects, for that matter), has weight and occupies space. I guess I can't prove all the ones I've only seen pictures of are real - they could be virtual constructs created in computer programs - but I trust most have been.

It's also possible that our shared common reality (to the extent that it is a shared, common reality - though on the GDP we seem to confirm that at least for our purposes by recognizing common externalities and using mutually understood language to discuss them) is "actually" a virtual construct in a vast alien computer simulation, but within that context - the only one available to us (unless you've broken on through to the other side) - I accept Danos as being as real as anything else.

Are they good guitars? My mid-60s Silvertone amp-in-caser certainly is. It's humble and plain, I guess, but it sounds great and every time I get it out of its case, it's in as good a shape and as functional as when I last put it in. 'Nother words, it's been both stable and durable since I bought it second-hand from a guy named Schrödinger.

It's true that I can't prove its condition when in the case - or even that it's actually there when the case is closed. It's possible that it only becomes real when I open the case, and that it reconstitutes itself in its last observed condition only when I see it.

But so far as I can tell, that's true about the rest of reality as well.

So, nope, Billy. Danos pass the reality test for me.

– Proteus

To quote Lily Tomlin's brilliant character Trudy the Bag Lady, "What is reality, but a collective hunch?"

Or, as John Lennon posited in "Strawberry Fields" --- nothing is real, which would include Danelectros, but also every other observable phenomenon, including Gretsches.

Me, I think reality is overrated.


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