Other Amps

trolling @ ATomic

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Well here's some of the lo-end stuff.

First a well -roaded Ampeg cab.

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Next a fine pair of Heathkit 3 channel heads... I wouln't mind trying one, really. Don't laugh, you might be surprised.

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Then the timeless Kustom graveyard... plus a few others outside of this shot that count.

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Some kinda modern-world Fender wtf

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Clean and cool but overpriced Kent bass -- never seen this particular style before. Right next to a 22.5" scale Mosrite Celebrity bass I do like but gotta pass. It's not going anywhere

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Kent also made a guitar version of that bass, called the Americana. They look super cool, I'd love to get my hands on one.

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Puts me in mind of "The Boneyard" at Davis-Monthan AFB. Here's part of mine. What's in YOUR shed?

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Puts me in mind of "The Boneyard" at Davis-Monthan AFB. Here's part of mine. What's in YOUR shed?

– DaveH

When I was stationed at Ft Huachuca (beginning of the 80's), we set up our communications rig right on the fence line of the aircraft storage area on Davis - Monthan AFB, to participate in a Joint Services Exercise. The boneyard was "Off Limits", but that didn't stop a few of us from rummaging around it the old WWII bomber aircraft. It was really cool to see the inside of the Flying Fortresses and fighter planes from that bygone era!

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Those Heathkit heads are pretty much the same as the US version of Vox Super Beatle heads. Heathkit had Thomas organ kits, and their biggest guitar amps were duplicates of the Voxes except they had two speakers instead of four.

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Those Heathkit heads are pretty much the same as the US version of Vox Super Beatle heads. Heathkit had Thomas organ kits, and their biggest guitar amps were duplicates of the Voxes except they had two speakers instead of four.

– wabash slim

I knew there was some Thomas Vox /Heathkit connection... actually the same metal knobs on T Vox amps also found on some Heathkit test equipment. These H Kits tho dont have all the crazed Super Beatle effects... fuzz, MRB, repeat percussion tho, the latter being lifted from Thomas organs.

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When I was stationed at Ft Huachuca (beginning of the 80's), we set up our communications rig right on the fence line of the aircraft storage area on Davis - Monthan AFB, to participate in a Joint Services Exercise. The boneyard was "Off Limits", but that didn't stop a few of us from rummaging around it the old WWII bomber aircraft. It was really cool to see the inside of the Flying Fortresses and fighter planes from that bygone era!

– Wade H

When I was in U. of Arizona AFROTC circa '63-'64 they took us out to DM for a B-47 walk-through, but changed their mind and said since those birds were still in service there was classified stuff on board, so they substituted a B-29. I went through the tube to the tail gunner's station and sat there for a couple minutes. It's smaller inside than it looks from the outside. Quite an experience! Toured the CAF B-17 "Sentimental Journey", too. It's smaller than in the movies - a bit bigger than the VW (old) Beetle's front-seat area.

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my picks would be the sano amp...like ampeg they built with accordians in mind..and the ultra cool kent bass!

cheers

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When I was in U. of Arizona AFROTC circa '63-'64 they took us out to DM for a B-47 walk-through, but changed their mind and said since those birds were still in service there was classified stuff on board, so they substituted a B-29. I went through the tube to the tail gunner's station and sat there for a couple minutes. It's smaller inside than it looks from the outside. Quite an experience! Toured the CAF B-17 "Sentimental Journey", too. It's smaller than in the movies - a bit bigger than the VW (old) Beetle's front-seat area.

– DaveH

WWII warbirds from the Collings Foundation make regular stops at the Purdue airport. I've been thru a B-17 (my Dad served on one) a B-24 (my namesake Uncle died in one), a B-25 and a DC3/C-47 (those were still in use when I served). All of them were meant for small, slim flexible people. The B-29 had the advantage of being pressurized, so, no O2 masks or heated suits for the crew. As Purdue was where Amelia Earhardt taught, they have quite a large airport and modern facilities. At times when the aviation students are doing touch and go landings, it's the busiest field in the state. They used to house the Playboy airliner, and have had a Ford Trimotor giving rides, as well as hosting the Goodyear blimp when it's in the area for games and such. The Air Force and Navy make stops in as well to help ROTC recruiting. It was exciting to hear the roar of jets or radials instead of the flat 6 Lycoming powerplants that were on he usual craft.

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I’ve had a poke around inside an old Lancaster, at 6ft2 I found it incredibly claustrophobic. How those kids sat in one for hours with all manner of hell happening outside I’ll never fully comprehend.

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didn't the Lanc have the tunnel to the rear gun turrets so small in diameter that you had to take your chute off to get through?

aviation in the ETO in WWII is a lifelong fascination of mine, but somehow i've never gotten to actually crawl around in one. the degree of innovation in flight from 1939 to 1945 was a quantum technological leap perhaps unparalleled until the age of semiconductors. Britain, Italy, the USSR, and the Eastern European states still had biplanes in regular service at the war's outset, and by 1944 Germany had swept-wing jet fighters and the UK wasn't far behind. watching the evolution, year by year and model by model, is like watching time-lapsed footage of a gorgeous, deadly flower unfolding.

my biggest fascination is the Battle of Britain, which is one of the few times in post-classical history that a few hundred people literally changed the course of history. there's an incredibly dramatic climax where Churchill is in the Ops Room on the day of the heaviest Luftwaffe attack and asks Lord Dowding (the head of RAF Fighter Command) "where are our reserves?" and is told "there are none." by dissuading the Nazis from attacking the UK until Hitler was distracted by the Russian plum hanging from the tree the fighter squadrons probably saved Western European civilization. less than three hundred men, if memory serves.

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Those Heathkit heads are pretty much the same as the US version of Vox Super Beatle heads. Heathkit had Thomas organ kits, and their biggest guitar amps were duplicates of the Voxes except they had two speakers instead of four.

– wabash slim

Wow. I didn’t know about the Heathkit-Thomas Organ connection. I have a Vox Buckingham head that I’ve been fixing up over time (new capacitors and fixing the reverb). That Heathkit head looks like it has similar controls to the Thomas-Vox heads. Are any schematics available for the Heathkit?

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Kent also made a guitar version of that bass, called the Americana. They look super cool, I'd love to get my hands on one.

– Otter

Like ths one. Use it quite bit and I think that the bass would look good beside it.

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my biggest fascination is the Battle of Britain...

As an Englishman who has live all his life in Kent I can say the stories one hears of the BoB are pretty humbling. Most of those heroes were barely out of their teens when they did that.

Have you read First Light by Geoffrey Wellum? If not I thoroughly recommend it.

We live high on the Kent Downs and found a bullet casing in our garden once with a metal detector. It was very old and can only have come from a dogfight during the war. Pretty surreal holding something like that.


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