Other Amps

Supro Blues King

1

Any of you try one yet?

I was at Guitar Center and to my surprise I saw this amp. Must be a new release, Tried it and liked it.

2

I saw they came out with that. Looks pretty cool! I’m really happy with my tremoverb so I wouldn’t hesitate to give it a try!

3

I saw they came out with that. Looks pretty cool! I’m really happy with my tremoverb so I wouldn’t hesitate to give it a try!

– Rockabilly_Nick

Nick, if you try one out please give your thoughts on it. I’m curious how you like it since you already have a Supro.

4

saw the namm '19 vids...i like that amp!...single ended 6l6 power section...and has dumblesque fet front end option..12 inch speaker and real pan reverb..599$

definitely of interest

cheers

5

Wow.....$599 is a really good price. Could be a good alternative to a Fender Blues Jr. Cab appears to be about the same size as a the Blues Jr.......have to wonder if if suffers from the "boxy" tone that a lot of small combos suffer from.

6

Wow.....$599 is a really good price. Could be a good alternative to a Fender Blues Jr. Cab appears to be about the same size as a the Blues Jr.......have to wonder if if suffers from the "boxy" tone that a lot of small combos suffer from.

– Gretschadelphia

When I played it I didn’t notice it sounding boxy like a Blues Jr.

7

Supro seem to have got around the boxy problem with their small amps, I think the circuit is tweaked that way. But in trying to get a big bottom end, some folks think they're too fat sounding. Or bass heavy. I reckon you can dial it out, or in as required. I gigged with my Supreme on full volume at the weekend and it was gnarly. Very gnarly. 25w through a 10" speaker and it filled the room

8

Seems to me it could easily be a top contender for the best bang for the buck small tube combo out there. It's got a real wood cab as opposed to MDF which is nice and with one 6L6 and one 12AX7 won't break the bank on tubes.

9

i'm going to get one later today!

10

i'm going to get one later today!

– Mark Kunie

Mark, congrats. Please report in this thread or a new discussion on how you like it.

I would have bought one but just bought a used Traynor amp that sounds better than my 1977 Deluxe Reverb. I know that heresy but hey it does. But later down the road the Supro is on my shopping list.

11

Just picked it up. Tried it new out of the box in GC Vegas. Used a new blacktop pup Gretsch. Sounded really right together. Got home. Just played it with the Setzer with TV Classics. Pretty much wow is what I can say. Better than a BJ.R. Ya need to dial in the right tone. The reverb is super fantastic. There are a lot of tonal options. I found this. Master full. Volume around 10-12 o clock Boost switch on. Gain switch off. It rocks. It does sound small kind of. I feel at this time it like Gretches. Gimme a few days to put my Comanche/Tele/Doheny through it. But with a Gretsch? It feels just right. I do recommend this amp though. It’s also beautiful and small

12

Brand names are such amazing entities. As long as one has recognition - let alone resonance or reverence - among part of the population, by skillful manipulation of imagery, evocative language, and a weird combination of appeal to nostalgia and exaggeration of historical legacy, it can be spun up into more than it ever was in its original heyday.

While Danelectro/Silvertone certainly moved tonnage in the 50s and 60s, I'll bet more Danos have been made since the 90s "revival" began than in the dear departed golden days of long ago. Quality and "faithfulness" to orignality have been up and down, creating a somewhat checkered (but fairly durable) market reputation. Overall, my sense is that the products released under the revived Danelectro name (with no connection to the original company - or even the country of manufacture) have fared better in the market just because of the name than if the marketeers had had to start from scratch with a new brand.

In contrast, during Dano/Silvertone's first go-round, quality of the brands was remarkably consistent in the cheap-but-good bracket - but because of the price point, they probably weren't well enough appreciated for their virtues. That is, even those of us who wanted those guitars and amps - and were glad to have them - knew they were a second - budget - choice to Fender, Gibson, and Vox.

But 50 years later, the originals have gained an aura of having been the treasured voice of an era. (And while they were an essential part of many of our musical lives, they weren't all that.)

With Supro, Absara has pulled off an even more remarkable bit of remarketing voodoo. "In the day," Supro was not regarded (by me or anyone I knew) as better or more desirable than Dano/Silvertone. They were right on the same shelf - not the top one. Second or even third-rank. Accepting that actual Gibsons, Fender JMs, Jags, Strats or Teles, Gretschs, and Ricks were out of our reach, we'd rather have had a Kalamazoo guitar (or a Musicmaster or Bronco) than a Danelectro, Silvertone, or Supro. (I think Danos were probably rather better than their reputation at the time, but Supros mostly...were not.)

And as for amps - Fender was ever the gold standard, Vox an acceptable silver medalist, Ampegs (as beloved as they are now) came in for a solid bronze. Standels and Magnatones had near-mythical status and were thus out of the equation; everything else - certainly including Supro - was simply what we settled for. (I'm talking about the era through the late 60s; Marshall didn't have much presence here before 1967-68.)

Valco amps may be treasured now for their own unique design and character. At the time they were very much the low end of the mass market.

Thus it's interesting (if not funny) to see Supro turned into a legend of a bygone era. Those of us who knew Supro amps back when remember them not with any particular fondness for their quality or character - but rather with a wistful sense of nostalgia and tenderness for our own youth. What would we trade for one evening back in our young skins, in that garage, or on the short "stage" of that grange hall, cranking cheap out-of-tune guitars with Black Diamond strings through farting and grunting Supros and Silvertones, a buddy whacking for all he's worth on Ludwigs with tin-can hi-hats and a cracked crash, shocking ourselves on Shure Unidynes trying to make ourselves heard through a Bogen PA on the shredded edge of bursting into flames?

Flashback Vacations will be a golden business opportunity for time travel that couldn't compromise the timeline - just sending travelers' consciousness back to ride for a few hours in their own youthful bodies.

Durn right we'd go. But would we want to stay there just for the sake of the gear?

Absara has done a marvelous job with the Supro name - better than anyone has done with Dano, arguably better than Eastwood has done with Airline. For one thing, the Supro logo is a danged handsome thing. It evokes the era without seeming quaint; it still looks great. Beyond that, Absara has moved Supro considerably upscale in refinement and quality.

When I saw the prices of the first Supro reissues, I thought it was some sort of comedy. It would never have occurred to my musical buddies and me that anything Supro could ever be priced with the big boys - because we never imagined it would perform with them. (The gray-and-piping salt-n-peppa look of the new Supros was faintly comic to me as well: no one among my acquaintances ever thought that look was cool at the time.) Instinctively assuming everyone would share my experience with Supro in the 60s, I couldn't imagine anyone spending serious amp money on that low-end heritage. Why pay that kind of money for brand-name embarrassment?

But the amps have all been ... really really nice. They've created a whole reputation and mystique for Supro it never had. Instead of taking a grand old brand name and doing it on the cheap to capture some nostalgia money, Absara has turned a second- or third-rate name into a premium brand. Had I thought about it a few years ago, I would probably have thought Absara would have been better off to introduce amps under a new unknown brand than to have to start from below zero with Supro.

But they knew better than I did: any brand with recognition is better than starting from scratch. I don't think the amps would have made the mark they have with an unknown brand - or with a more generic look. And now Absara has consolidated Supro's 21st century position with guitars that honor the originals while engineering out all the deficiencies which plagued them in their Chicago days. Good work.

My first impulse when I started rolling the video of the Blues King was to say "I never heard a Supro sound like that; it's Supro in name only (and that's a good thing)". But the more I listened, the more I thought I heard a distinctive Valco/Supro "toneprint." It really does kinda sound like what was good about those amps (a certain balance, a midrange spread much in contrast to Fender scoop) - and it even farts and breaks up (or should I say "apart") a bit like an old Supro when cranked, with the rasp and the flabby low end that was always too much for the installed speakers.

But it does all that in a controlled and reliable way - in an optional way that can be corrected and smoothed with the provided controls - with more confidence and authority, more punch and mass than Supros had. And, of course, conveniences like a high-gain mode and master volume were unheard-of on the originals. All in all, Absara has uncovered, updated and translated Supro virtues into a usable, pro-grade modern amp that captures the vibe without the vices.

That's a cool way to update a brand name. Full marks! Last thing I need is another amp, but I'll be interested to give this one a try if I get a chance.

13

Whoa, bout wore me out, but you made some great points about then and now.

Now, I'm into the "Silver medalist" tone, and Cave Valley's Marshall spin.

Back then, we could only dream about owning a Vox or one of the new Marshalls that just hit the States, while bloodying our fingers on Silvertone guitars and a variety of particle board amps.

The resurrection of some old named amps just brings back memories of being a kid. Doesn't open my billfold though.

14

Ok. So with the Comanche. It’s even as good. Great feel and compression. Pick attack and touch responsiveness is really good. 2 guitars. Can’t really find a reason not to like it. Still need more time. MK

15

...but....why...the cheap price compared with the rest of their range? Fet amps? China build? Cheaper materials? It's a grand cheaper than some other models!

16

...but....why...the cheap price compared with the rest of their range? Fet amps? China build? Cheaper materials? It's a grand cheaper than some other models!

– Vince_Ray

Maybe because it’s much smaller.

17

& a one hander at 28 lbs!...not bad for a 12" speaker tube combo!

also has effects loop and line out

well thought out little slugger...the single ended 6l6 idea is great...it's getting great reviews

cheers

18

CAUTION!!!!

Mike Hermans could make a rabid cat in a garbage can sound awesome!

19

Maybe because it’s much smaller.

– ThePolecats

There's smaller and more expensive models in the range, like the 1605r

20

There's smaller and more expensive models in the range, like the 1605r

– Vince_Ray

I guess physical size of amp doesn’t indicate price.

21

Brand names are such amazing entities. As long as one has recognition - let alone resonance or reverence - among part of the population, by skillful manipulation of imagery, evocative language, and a weird combination of appeal to nostalgia and exaggeration of historical legacy, it can be spun up into more than it ever was in its original heyday.

While Danelectro/Silvertone certainly moved tonnage in the 50s and 60s, I'll bet more Danos have been made since the 90s "revival" began than in the dear departed golden days of long ago. Quality and "faithfulness" to orignality have been up and down, creating a somewhat checkered (but fairly durable) market reputation. Overall, my sense is that the products released under the revived Danelectro name (with no connection to the original company - or even the country of manufacture) have fared better in the market just because of the name than if the marketeers had had to start from scratch with a new brand.

In contrast, during Dano/Silvertone's first go-round, quality of the brands was remarkably consistent in the cheap-but-good bracket - but because of the price point, they probably weren't well enough appreciated for their virtues. That is, even those of us who wanted those guitars and amps - and were glad to have them - knew they were a second - budget - choice to Fender, Gibson, and Vox.

But 50 years later, the originals have gained an aura of having been the treasured voice of an era. (And while they were an essential part of many of our musical lives, they weren't all that.)

With Supro, Absara has pulled off an even more remarkable bit of remarketing voodoo. "In the day," Supro was not regarded (by me or anyone I knew) as better or more desirable than Dano/Silvertone. They were right on the same shelf - not the top one. Second or even third-rank. Accepting that actual Gibsons, Fender JMs, Jags, Strats or Teles, Gretschs, and Ricks were out of our reach, we'd rather have had a Kalamazoo guitar (or a Musicmaster or Bronco) than a Danelectro, Silvertone, or Supro. (I think Danos were probably rather better than their reputation at the time, but Supros mostly...were not.)

And as for amps - Fender was ever the gold standard, Vox an acceptable silver medalist, Ampegs (as beloved as they are now) came in for a solid bronze. Standels and Magnatones had near-mythical status and were thus out of the equation; everything else - certainly including Supro - was simply what we settled for. (I'm talking about the era through the late 60s; Marshall didn't have much presence here before 1967-68.)

Valco amps may be treasured now for their own unique design and character. At the time they were very much the low end of the mass market.

Thus it's interesting (if not funny) to see Supro turned into a legend of a bygone era. Those of us who knew Supro amps back when remember them not with any particular fondness for their quality or character - but rather with a wistful sense of nostalgia and tenderness for our own youth. What would we trade for one evening back in our young skins, in that garage, or on the short "stage" of that grange hall, cranking cheap out-of-tune guitars with Black Diamond strings through farting and grunting Supros and Silvertones, a buddy whacking for all he's worth on Ludwigs with tin-can hi-hats and a cracked crash, shocking ourselves on Shure Unidynes trying to make ourselves heard through a Bogen PA on the shredded edge of bursting into flames?

Flashback Vacations will be a golden business opportunity for time travel that couldn't compromise the timeline - just sending travelers' consciousness back to ride for a few hours in their own youthful bodies.

Durn right we'd go. But would we want to stay there just for the sake of the gear?

Absara has done a marvelous job with the Supro name - better than anyone has done with Dano, arguably better than Eastwood has done with Airline. For one thing, the Supro logo is a danged handsome thing. It evokes the era without seeming quaint; it still looks great. Beyond that, Absara has moved Supro considerably upscale in refinement and quality.

When I saw the prices of the first Supro reissues, I thought it was some sort of comedy. It would never have occurred to my musical buddies and me that anything Supro could ever be priced with the big boys - because we never imagined it would perform with them. (The gray-and-piping salt-n-peppa look of the new Supros was faintly comic to me as well: no one among my acquaintances ever thought that look was cool at the time.) Instinctively assuming everyone would share my experience with Supro in the 60s, I couldn't imagine anyone spending serious amp money on that low-end heritage. Why pay that kind of money for brand-name embarrassment?

But the amps have all been ... really really nice. They've created a whole reputation and mystique for Supro it never had. Instead of taking a grand old brand name and doing it on the cheap to capture some nostalgia money, Absara has turned a second- or third-rate name into a premium brand. Had I thought about it a few years ago, I would probably have thought Absara would have been better off to introduce amps under a new unknown brand than to have to start from below zero with Supro.

But they knew better than I did: any brand with recognition is better than starting from scratch. I don't think the amps would have made the mark they have with an unknown brand - or with a more generic look. And now Absara has consolidated Supro's 21st century position with guitars that honor the originals while engineering out all the deficiencies which plagued them in their Chicago days. Good work.

My first impulse when I started rolling the video of the Blues King was to say "I never heard a Supro sound like that; it's Supro in name only (and that's a good thing)". But the more I listened, the more I thought I heard a distinctive Valco/Supro "toneprint." It really does kinda sound like what was good about those amps (a certain balance, a midrange spread much in contrast to Fender scoop) - and it even farts and breaks up (or should I say "apart") a bit like an old Supro when cranked, with the rasp and the flabby low end that was always too much for the installed speakers.

But it does all that in a controlled and reliable way - in an optional way that can be corrected and smoothed with the provided controls - with more confidence and authority, more punch and mass than Supros had. And, of course, conveniences like a high-gain mode and master volume were unheard-of on the originals. All in all, Absara has uncovered, updated and translated Supro virtues into a usable, pro-grade modern amp that captures the vibe without the vices.

That's a cool way to update a brand name. Full marks! Last thing I need is another amp, but I'll be interested to give this one a try if I get a chance.

– Proteus

When you get to try one. You are gonna like it.

22

I’ve been going back and forth with a Cdr. bassman and even a mustang 3. This supro is great in a different way. I’m starting to like it more and more Made in China. And finished in USA. Only it says nothing on the amp. I found it on their website and the label on the box. The top says absara New York. But nowhere visible does it say made in anywhere It’s a solid performer and sadly I like it better than the 3 bjr amps I have had

23

I played one at GC yesterday. I’m gonna get one

24

I played one at GC yesterday. I’m gonna get one

25

Well, after almost 1 week with this amplifier, I can say that it does very well with all types of pickups and guitars, BUT with the TV Classics in my Gretsch? It was like a made in heaven type of thing. So It is surely worth your time and I am sure you will come to the same conclusion as I did! Now how much better will she sound after the speaker breaks in? Anyway just thought I would give you my final outlook on this fine amp!


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