Other Amps

reverb vs. non-reverb price differential

1

Really talking 2 Fender combos here-- you know which ones -- Princeton and Deluxe.

Of course the reverb versions sell for more but where do you draw the line and say "I'll just use a [insert your fave reverb pedal] instead" (which for me is an Holy Grail Nano even tho Flerb holds zero sonic appeal )

Onboard tube spring reverb is still super important to some players, and others don't care and some want different types of reverb other than spring. I hear there is a tiny, lost tribe of players who don't want any reverb but this ain't about them.

Just wondering if say a clean silver panel Princeton is $X and am eqivalent reverb version is $X + X %, is there some point where you just say forget it and buy the cheaper amp w/ a reverb added in externally.

For me reverb is still associated with the amp enough that I hardwire/ fasten the pedal to the top of the amp, since it's always on.

Also would take some study, but would be interesting to know if the going reverb vs. non reverb price differential is really the same for Princeton and Deluxe.

And further, if silver panels including the short lived faux black panel ones, were over by I think 1982 -- does anyone remember if the non reverb versions were offered right to to the end, or faded a few years earlier?

2

I don't follow the market enough to know about pricing (and it's different in every city anyways), but with a lot of those amps the reverb and non reverb ones are different circuits, not just reverb tacked on to the same base. So you're kinda comparing apples and oranges. You might find you like the sound of one over the other. Reverb pedals have come a long way, so we're not necessarily tied to the reverb that comes with the amp anymore, but it will sound different having the reverb before or after the first couple of triodes.

I've had some really good reverb pedals, but one thing I've learned about myself is I won't buy another amp without reverb. We all have different requirements.

3

My ‘64 Deluxe non-reverb that I bought from Ryan sounds to me better than the DRs I’ve tried from that year. It can do the sweet but can get more aggressive than the DR. Just my non-scientific judgement as I haven’t played them side by side.

As far as price goes, the non-reverb Deluxes do seem to go for $500 less than the DRs from the same year, last time I checked.

4

Yes there were some changes made to squeeze reverb into them, but still was curious was the general 'ain't worth it' take is.

The general feeling was reverb ones are a ltitle louder -- reverb gain, I guess.

For the serious hardcores like I used to be -- it had to be a separate 3 knob Fender reverb. I know a guy w/ a mod for those (reissues only please!) that steps up the output of them. w/ no distortion and past 4 later silver panel 4 tube version that corrected the volume loss.

5

As others have written - they sound very different. The non-verb Princeton I had sounded like a lil-Twin. I used it with an external 6G15

If you wanted a cleaner sounding amp the non-verbs are great and, I think, work better with a hollow.( I liked the PR with a tele.)

Reverb pedals sound good but I find they do something funny to my tone. The 6g15 also changes the tone but in a way that I find appealing

6

The Reverb Fenders have an extra gain stage that most definitely changes the tone, even with the Reverb "off". There is definitely a charm to the non-Reverb ones.

7

I have a '64 Princeton, non-reverb. It's as clean as a whistle all the way up to 10. The extra gain stage in the reverb models really changes things.

8

Yep, it's about that extra gain stage as much as it is about the reverb. I've had two non-reverb princetons, and tried hard to love them, but they were too clean, too dead, too undynamic for my taste. I liked the tremolo in them, but that was about it.

9

Yep, it's about that extra gain stage as much as it is about the reverb. I've had two non-reverb princetons, and tried hard to love them, but they were too clean, too dead, too undynamic for my taste. I liked the tremolo in them, but that was about it.

– WB

Yep if squeaky clean is your thing they are great. Takes pedals well though, but I like amp to break up.

10

It's great to be here with everyone, I have a lot of knowledge from what you share, to say thank you, the information and knowledge here helps me a lot. us map

11

It also depends upon whether you want your reverb to be before the preamp in your signal chain, as with pedals or after the amp's first gain stage.......unless you have a modern model with an effects loop.


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